Pediatric Hearing Loss Providers’ Points of View: Counseling, Comfort Levels, and Certification
Pediatric Hearing Loss Providers’ Points of View: Counseling, Comfort Levels, and Certification
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These three articles center on aspects of audiology and speech-language pathology providers in pediatric hearing loss.

First, “eHealth Coaching: Counseling Characteristics of Coaches Used With Parents” centers on identifying clinician communication behaviors and missed opportunities during an eHealth intervention. Themes were identified within each category. Trends included greater use of close-ended questions over open-ended questions, frequent responses to parent emotions, and engagement in a shared process through providing information and exploring progress on parent goals. Missed opportunities occurred within each category. Coaches' communication behaviors demonstrated support for parent learning that was positively received. Joint planning to address parent challenges was a missed opportunity to support parent behavior changes regarding hearing-aid routines.

The aim of “Listening and Spoken Language Specialist Auditory–Verbal Certification: Self-Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Inform Change” was to explore the professional's viewpoint on the path to the Listening and Spoken Language Specialist (LSLS) certification. There were 295 participants from different parts of the world: certified LSLSs, mentees pursuing certification, and professionals interested in certification. The study addressed motivation, self-perceived gains, challenges, and barriers in an international cohort. The purpose of the study was to guide future changes within the certification system. Several indicators pointed to the need for more awareness of significant gains LSLS certification can bring to professionals. There is also a need to address, minimize, and overcome perceived barriers in the process. Similarly, research is warranted to explore obtaining LSLS certification outside English-speaking countries and with a larger, more population-based sample.

In the closing article, “Comfort Levels of Providers Serving Children Who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing: Discrepancies and Opportunities,” Blaiser and Mahshie discuss that while best practice outlines specific skills and expertise from highly qualified providers, in reality, many lack confidence related to hearing technology and resources related to serving children who are deaf/hard of hearing (DHH). The study surveyed 459 professionals in ASHA serving children who are DHH. The intent was to compare differences in confidence, training, and using resources between providers who have a self-selected interest in working with children who are DHH (membership in SIG 9) and those who serve children who are DHH and are not part of the hearing-related SIG. The results indicate that there is limited provider confidence in working with this population. These conclusions provide graduate training programs opportunities to explore provision of more intensive, comprehensive experience to better serve children who are DHH.

Learning Outcomes
You will be able to:

  • identify themes related to clinician communication behaviors and missed opportunities with parents during an eHealth audiology visit
  • list participants’ described common barriers in the LSLS certification process
  • describe ways to meet the needs of providers serving children who are DHH to improve comfort levels and support resources

Assessment Type
Self-assessment—Think about what you learned and report on the Completion Form how you will use your new knowledge.

Articles in This Course

  1. eHealth Coaching: Counseling Characteristics of Coaches Used With Parents by Kylie R. Johnson, Karen Muñoz, Guadalupe G. San Miguel, and Michael Twohig, published in SIG 9, Volume 8, Issue 1, February 8, 2023
  2. Listening and Spoken Language Specialist Auditory–Verbal Certification: Self-Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Inform Change by Maria Emilia de Melo, Uma Soman, Jenna Voss, Maria Fernanda Hinojosa Valencia, Dorie Noll, Frances Clark, Gayla Hutsell Guignard, and Ulrika Löfkvist, published in SIG 9, Volume 7, Issue 6, December 14, 2022
  3. Comfort Levels of Providers Serving Children Who Are Deaf/Hard of Hearing: Discrepancies and Opportunities by Kristina M. Blaiser and James Mahshie, published in SIG 9, Volume 7, Issue 5, October 20, 2022

Continuing Education

0.35
3.5
3/23/2023 to 3/23/2028
Intermediate

Product Information

Item #(s): WEBS0920911
Client Age: Children
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
Language: English

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