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Controversies and Consensus in Dysphagia Management
Event Dates:8/3/2022-8/15/2022
Format(s): Online Conference
Do you know how to critically evaluate conflicting evidence to optimize outcomes for your patients with dysphagia? In this online conference, leading clinicians and researchers explore different perspectives on critical issues in dysphagia management. Walk away with the essential information you need to enhance your clinical decision-making and optimize patient outcomes.
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Audiology 2022
Event Dates:9/7/2022-9/19/2022
Format(s): Online Conference
ASHA's Audiology Online Conference is back for 2022! Expert speakers will delve into a variety of audiology topics, focusing on three primary tracks: implantable devices, working with patients with intellectual disabilities, and expanding your clinical role.
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Assessment, Eligibility, and Dismissal in Schools: Strategies, Tools, and Decision-Making
Event Dates:10/12/2022-10/24/2022
Format(s): Online Conference
In this comprehensive online conference, leading clinicians and researchers address all aspects of conducting assessments and determining eligibility, appropriate services, and dismissal for students of all ages. Get the tools and strategies you need to conduct meaningful assessments and to use your findings to drive decisions and develop plans of care to improve outcomes for a variety of clinical concerns, whether your students are preschoolers, school-age, or high schoolers. 
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Clinical Impact of Research
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These SIG Special Topics articles provide guidance to current and future researchers in communication sciences and disorders about how to maximize the clinical impact of their research. Utianski et al. describe clinical practice research and the current barriers to it, while highlighting initiatives researchers can take advantage of. Douglas et al. define knowledge brokering and outline the roles of organizations and individuals who take on that job. Then, Davidson and colleagues offer researchers concrete steps for using social media to enhance impact. Finally, Nicholson and Smith review both traditional science impact metrics and alternative metrics and offer concrete recommendations for documenting clinical impact for use in one’s CV or career advancement materials.
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Predictors of Caseload Size and Articulation Intervention
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This SIG 16 Perspectives activity includes research that focuses on caseload issues and articulation intervention. In the first article, Shanks and Hall-Mills examine the relationship between school factors and speech-language therapy enrollment in public schools. They determined that certain factors such as socioeconomic status and English as a second or other language enrollment correlate to high caseloads. The next two articles focus on articulation intervention in special populations. Flipsen and Sacks replicate the findings of a previous study regarding the efficacy of using the SATPAC (Systematic Articulation Training Program Accessing Computers) approach with children receiving intervention through response to intervention. Reported findings indicate that SATPAC can be used effectively within the response to intervention process to remediate single sound errors in children. Finally, Findley and Gasparyan investigate the effectiveness of biofeedback technologies as a form of intervention for speech sound production. Specifically, they explore the use of speech to text in children with articulation disorders.
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Dysphagia in Practice: Thickening Practices, Family-Centered Care, & Early Intervention
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This collection of SIG 13 articles addresses popular topics in dysphagia care throughout the life span regarding thickening practices, family-centered care, and early intervention. Jane Mertz Garcia, Edgar Chambers IV, and Anna Boyer utilized a survey to re-examine practice patterns for thickened liquids and provided a comparison of past practices with current to provide insight into contemporary themes that have previously not been considered. Doreen Benson and George Barnes explore the utility of a mathematical prediction model (Bayes theorem) in dysphagia management. Samantha E. Shune, Deanna Linville, and Ashwini Namasivayam-MacDonald address maximizing treatment effectiveness by using an approach with family resiliency and adaptation. Drawing from the principles of family systems theory and the biopsychosocial-spiritual framework, they use a case study as a tutorial to explore the application of family-centered care models to dysphagia management. Stephanie C. Cohen and Karen Dilfer focus on the definition of pediatric feeding disorder (PFD) and the multifaceted needs of families and children in early intervention, support for use of responsive feeding in treatment of PFD, alignment of responsive feeding strategies with early intervention principles, and barriers limiting access to consistent, high-quality early intervention services for children with PFD.
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Feeding and Swallowing in School-Age Children: Anatomy and Physiology (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on-demand webinar (available beginning August 3, 2022) describes anatomical and physiological structures and functions related to feeding and swallowing to assist clinicians in interpreting evaluation findings and selecting appropriate treatment strategies for students on their caseload. The presenter discusses sensorimotor function of the trunk, shoulders, head, and neck, as well as of the upper aerodigestive tract, and reviews oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal structures and functions. The webinar includes case studies that address the impact of impaired anatomy and physiology in students with feeding and swallowing disorders.
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Teleaudiology: Remote Hearing Screening
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course discusses validated technologies for remote hearing screening in the digital age, including options for no-touch screening with uncalibrated equipment and low-touch remote screening. The course is part of a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
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Hearing Assistive Technology for Students Who Are Deaf/Hard of Hearing: One Size Does Not Fit All
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This webinar explores challenges school professionals face regarding Hearing Assistive Technology (HAT), discusses preferred practices for determining HAT eligibility, and shares practical guides to use in your work setting. The speaker addresses common questions like: "How can I ensure that this HAT is appropriate for this student?" "How can I ensure that the equipment is working each day?" "How can I get buy-in from school partners regarding the equipment's day-to-day use?"
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Foundations of Stroboscopic Interpretation and Clinical Cases
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In this series of SIG 3 articles, a foundation for laryngeal endoscopic imaging and interpreting videostroboscopic parameters is provided. These concepts are then put into practice in the context of three case studies focused on muscle tension dysphonia, bilateral vocal fold lesions, and vocal fold immobility. In the cases, auditory perceptual analysis, acoustic and aerodynamic measures, and candidacy for voice therapy are assessed in addition to videostroboscopic parameters. Video and audio examples are included to provide an interactive experience for the reader.
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Telepractice and Kids: Lessons From Remote Service Delivery During the Pandemic
Format(s): Journal (Online)
The articles in this journal self-study explore the effects of remote audiology and speech-language service delivery for children during the COVID-19 pandemic. The articles identify and describe experiences with remote service delivery, discuss the impacts on children, and focus on what has been learned. The articles highlight future research and practical takeaways audiologists and speech-language pathologists can use to provide and expand quality services via telepractice moving forward.
Autism and Telepractice
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This SIG 1 Perspectives activity focuses on how to work with students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their caregivers via telepractice. The first article provides five practical tips for supporting families of children with ASD while implementing effective interventions via various telepractice modalities. The second article reviews the feasibility of implementing telehealth programs related to behavioral interventions for families and their children with ASD. The third article explores the usability of a web-based application of the JASPER social communication intervention. The fourth article discusses the results of a survey completed by speech-language pathologists who utilized telepractice to teach children with autism to access and use augmentative and alternative communication devices. The final article shares current available research related to the barriers of and solutions to conducting telehealth assessment and interventions for families and their students with ASD.
Feeding and Swallowing Assessments in the School Setting (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar explores the expertise and tools needed to successfully conduct a comprehensive feeding and swallowing assessment in a school setting. The presenter provides step-by-step guidance to boost clinicians' confidence as they navigate this unique environment and leverage available resources to clearly identify students' feeding and swallowing needs when establishing eligibility and implementing preferred practice recommendations in the educational setting.
Hearing Health and Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Format(s): Journal (Online)
The articles in this journal self-study explore research related to various aspects of hearing health and care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific topics include: supporting individuals with tinnitus, teaching students about noise-induced hearing loss, and understanding pandemic-related disruptions to hearing abilities and care. Audiologists will take away information they can apply as the pandemic and audiology practice continue to evolve.
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Considerations for Dysphagia Intervention in the Hospital: Adult and Pediatric
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This SIG 13 collection of astute articles provides information regarding managing and treating dysphagia in the hospital for both adult and pediatric patients. Nalia GurgelJuarez and colleagues explore the frequency of oral care based on staff adherence to oral care policies. Rebecca Smith et al. investigate the quality-of-life impacts of dysphagia and its interventions on mealtimes using the Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Eating Assessment Tool. Jessica L. Rice and Maureen A. LeftonGreif review high-flow nasal cannula mechanisms of action, its use in specific populations and settings, and what is known about initiation of feeding during this therapy. Finally, Donna Edwards and colleagues explore the impact of COVID-19 on modifications in clinical practice related to pediatric feeding disorders and dysphagia via telehealth.
Prerequisite Coursework Bundle: Assistants Certification
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course bundle includes three courses that satisfy coursework requirements for individuals seeking ASHA certification as an audiology assistant or a speech-language pathology assistant. (These courses are not eligible for ASHA CEUs.)
Safety Precautions in Speech, Language, and Hearing Professions
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course provides an overview of safety precautions for speech, language, and hearing professionals in both health care and school settings. The presenter discusses safe and effective practices and reviews relevant clinical scenarios. The course satisfies the universal precautions coursework requirement for individuals seeking ASHA certification as an audiology assistant or a speech-language pathology assistant. (This course is not eligible for ASHA CEUs.)
Ethical Professional Behavior and ASHA Assistants Code of Conduct
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course provides a review of the ASHA Assistants Code of Conduct, which provides a framework and guide to support day-to-day decision-making. The presenter describes each component of the Code of Conduct and highlights clinical scenarios that apply the Code of Conduct. The course satisfies the ethics coursework requirement for individuals seeking ASHA certification as an audiology assistant or a speech-language pathology assistant. (This course is not eligible for ASHA CEUs.)
Confidentiality in the Speech, Language, and Hearing Professions
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course provides an overview of privacy laws affecting speech, language, and hearing professionals. The presenter discusses privacy laws and reviews clinical scenarios in both health care and school settings. The course satisfies the patient confidentiality coursework requirement for individuals seeking ASHA certification as an audiology assistant or a speech-language pathology assistant. (This course is not eligible for ASHA CEUs.)
Assessment and Treatment Considerations
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
The first two articles in this SIG 19 activity provide information to better our assessment and treatment of individuals in the area of voice, while the latter two articles focus on treatment of individuals in the area of speech production. The authors for all four articles present a review of the literature as well as challenges and future directions. First, Van Hook and Duffy conducted a pilot study to trial the Gender Spectrum Voice Inventory. This article provides a review, discussion of validity, and speech-language pathologists’ perceptions of the inventory in an effort to address a gap in available clinical tools for transgender and nonbinary people. Next, Hammer reviews the relationship between air flow with sound pressure level during syllable production while holding fundamental frequency and subglottic air pressure constant. The results have clinical implications that stress the importance of an increase in air flow and focus on vocal fold contact. Then, Gritsyk et al. describe their study to determine which measures of somatosensory acuity best predicted change in production accuracy during vowel learning tasks while controlling auditory acuity. Results indicate only bite block adaptation with auditory masking was significantly associated with performance. Finally, Zajac et al. discuss their preliminary study that indicated cleft type contributes to production errors, specifically backing, in children with repaired cleft palate. Additionally, a history of otitis media affects the spectral contrast of alveolar consonants in children without clefts.
Assessment and Treatment of Pediatric Dysarthria (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar introduces practical clinical decision-making frameworks for evaluating and treating children with dysarthria and illustrates their application through clinical case examples. The course strives to increase SLPs' confidence in evaluating and treating children with dysarthria.
Counseling in Acquired Brain Injury
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These SIG 2 Perspectives articles focus on counseling skills for working with persons with aphasia, “counseling+” activities for patients with mild cognitive impairment and dementia, and resilience in neurorehabilitation. Topics include counseling skills; counseling roles of SLPs; care partner training; and resilience in persons with acquired brain injury, aphasia, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease.
Ethical Challenges in Various School-Based Scenarios
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This SIG 1 activity focuses on ethical challenges that audiologists and SLPs may face in various school-based scenarios. A 5-step ethical decision-making approach is presented. An ethical decision-making model is used to help prepare clinicians for the ethical continuation of telepractice in schools. Some thoughts and tools for connecting ethical practices with the provision of culturally sensitive/responsive services are provided.
What Is Dynamic Assessment?
Format(s): Micro Course
When testing children from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds, SLPs can use dynamic assessment (DA) as an alternative to standardized testing. In this course - which is broken into six 5-minute blocks - speaker Elizabeth Peña answers the oft-asked question, "What exactly IS dynamic assessment?" Peña explains how DA is different from other process-based approaches and guides you through identifying individuals on your caseload who could benefit from DA.
Observing Modifiability During Dynamic Assessment
Format(s): Micro Course
Dynamic assessment - an alternative to standardized testing that accounts for individuals' unique cultural and linguistic identities - helps SLPs identify disorder within linguistic variability. Thus, it is critically important to make careful systematic observations of learning during dynamic assessment. In this course - which is broken into six 5-minute blocks - speaker Elizabeth Peña explores what SLPs need to pay attention to during a mediated learning experience session and guides you through identifying key indicators to help you make clinical decisions for an individual on your caseload.
Using Mediated Learning Experience in Dynamic Assessment
Format(s): Micro Course
Mediated learning experience (MLE) is integral to dynamic assessment, an alternative to standardized testing that accounts for individuals' unique cultural and linguistic identities. In this course - which is broken into six 5-minute blocks - speaker Elizabeth Peña discusses the components of MLE and guides you through building an activity using principles of MLE.
Clinical Decision-Making With Dynamic Assessment
Format(s): Micro Course
A challenge in conducing dynamic assessment - an alternative to standardized testing that accounts for individuals' unique cultural and linguistic identities - is putting together all the information to make a clinical decision. In this course - which is broken into six 5-minute blocks - speaker Elizabeth Peña discusses using dynamic assessment to identify indicators of language difference and language disorder and how to incorporate this information into a clinical report and intervention plan. Peña gives examples and guides you through making recommendations about intervention based on dynamic assessment results.
Adult Dysphagia Management: Diet, Sleep Apnea, Intensive Care Unit, and Dementia
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This quartet of SIG 13 articles provides information regarding managing and treating dysphagia in the adult population. Caileen Harvey, Rachel Flemming, Julia Davis, and Victoria Reynolds investigate International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative implementation issues by surveying health care professionals in health care facilities in rural Upstate New York. Ankita M. Bhutada, William A. Broughton, Brenda L. Beverly, Dahye Choi, Sandip Barui, and Kendrea L. (Focht) Garand aim to identify the prevalence of dysphagia and reflux reported symptoms in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and determine associations between symptoms and demographic and clinical variables. Stevie Marvin summarizes published research on screening, evaluating, and treating post-extubation dysphagia in the intensive care unit. Rebekah Guastella, Stefania Oppedisano, Luis F. Riquelme, and Ashwini M. Namasivayam-MacDonald study bolus location at swallow onset, stage transition, pharyngeal transition duration, pharyngeal response duration, and pharyngeal phase duration between cued and uncued swallowing conditions in patients with dementia.
Clinical Practice Considerations: COVID-19, Word Retrieval, and Tinnitus
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
Three clinical practice considerations are reviewed within, including communication with patients/families in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, identification of word finding errors in normally aging individuals, and how to address severe tinnitus. The first article points out that communication demands have changed during the pandemic, with increased need for communication about the virus and necessary precautions; however, mask use and social distancing have had a negative impact on everyone’s communication, especially those with communication disorders. COVID-19 specific precautions have included restriction of visitors in hospitals and nursing homes, quarantining, mask wearing, social distancing. Those with communication disorders experience specific circumstances that put them at a disadvantage as a result of these measures, to the extent that some disability rights groups argued that these policies may be violating acts and policies that are in place specifically to protect these individuals. This article goes on to explore, within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, the importance of clear patient–provider communication, the impact of culture on communication, and using clear terminology. The second article sought to develop clinical practice by examining variations in performance on different verbal tasks completed by typically aging adults without neurological impairment who self-identified as either having or not having word-retrieval difficulties that frequently affected their lifestyle. The authors studied fifty-seven healthy adults between the ages of 54 and 71, by separating them into one group without selfidentified word retrieval difficulties and one group with self-identified word retrieval difficulties. Formal and informal assessment measures were used to objectively identify word-finding difficulties. The final article addresses the problem of tinnitus, which is broken down into two forms: bothersome and nonbothersome. Treatment is typically initiated when it becomes bothersome to the person experiencing it. The author reviews risk factors for developing tinnitus. In this specific instance, tinnitus was reported following a procedure that was intended to reduce vertigo. The patient opted to manage her tinnitus with pharmaceuticals, sound therapy, and education in the form of Tinnitus Retraining Therapy. The author describes the evaluation and treatment of each component in great detail. The result was a significant improvement in symptoms and the patient’s quality of life and functional abilities.
Cracking the Code: CPT and ICD-10 Coding Fundamentals for SLPs
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This course provides a foundation of practical coding knowledge to help SLPs accurately submit payment claims. The course reviews diagnosis and procedure coding fundamentals, including the important rules and tools to help avoid common pitfalls. Speakers explore real-world coding and claims case studies and provide strategies you can use to navigate your own unique scenarios.
Executive Functions and Language: Self-Talk, Syntax, Semantics, and Strategies for Planning and Self-Regulation
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This SIG 1 Perspectives activity focuses on the relationship between language and executive function (EF) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and/or developmental language disorder (DLD). A clinical model of language therapy for adolescents with DLD and concomitant EF deficits was proposed. Finally, a theoretical framework for understanding and promoting metacognition and EF as part of assessment and treatment plans for speech-language pathologists was discussed.
Social Considerations: Exercise and Engagement, Communicative Participation
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This Perspectives activity contains three articles, all with emphasis on social considerations in the elderly, with emphases on risk factors for dementia and treatment of Parkinson’s Disease. The first article seeks to describe the validity and reliability of the Fun and Social Engagement Evaluation (FUSE). The authors explain that this is an important topic because lack of physical activity and low social engagement are risk factors for dementia and could impact the rate of decline associated with dementia. Furthermore, physical inactivity has been identified by the World Health Organization as a leading risk factor for global mortality. Nursing home residents were evaluated using the FUSE during “Bingocize” sessions; the program combines a bingo-like game and physical activity and is scaled for differing cognitive and physical levels of ability. Results indicate that the FUSE is a valid and reliable method to measure engagement, and this is important because this measure can be recommended to nursing homes to measure engagement, as well as used in future research. The second article attempts to determine which of a variety of factors were associated with communicative participation and measured this based on the social network size of an individual. The author feels that this is important because social isolation is linked to cognitive decline and depression, both of which are risk factors for developing dementia. This study builds on previous research related to social participation and communication as predictors of successful health outcomes. Two research questions are addressed: What numbers of communication partners exist in the self-reported social network of older adults? And what factors are included in a model for predicting the social network size of older adults? They studied 337 seniors in Central Arkansas by collecting interviews and conducting standardized assessments. Results indicate that cognition and education are factors that are related to communicative participation. The results of this study, along with additional literature on this topic, suggest that there is benefit in recognizing a decrease in communicative participation and the role that cognitive decline may play in restricting communicative participation. The final article describes the program developed at Long Island University Brooklyn, which is multidisciplinary in nature, in contrast to previous treatment models which have traditionally focused on a monodisciplinary approach. In the past decade, there has been a shift from monodisciplinary models and research to a multidisciplinary approach, which is more effective in holistically treating the multifaceted effects of Parkinson’s Disease (PD), resulting in better outcomes and social participation for individuals with PD. The article describes use of the Fitness for PD exercise program twice per week for ten weeks, targeting strength, balance, agility, stretching, and aerobic exercises. Students at the university are engaged in taking vitals, facilitating resistance training, and enhancing safety; students and participants find benefit in working together. One hour Speech Clinic for PD sessions are conducted after each fitness class, including voice evaluations and therapy focusing on maximizing voice production and improving breathing patterns. The first half of sessions are conducted in game format, which encourages interpersonal interactions and collaboration and facilitates carryover into conversational contexts. Sessions incorporate Motor Learning Principles, LSVT LOUD, and respiratory exercises. The second half of sessions are conducted in whole-group format and speech practice in small groups.
Beginner’s Guide to Successfully Working in Schools (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Working as a school-based SLP is exciting and rewarding-when you understand your role! This on demand webinar (available beginning April 30, 2022) provides SLPs who are new to the school setting with effective practices, resources, and an introduction to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The speakers share practical strategies to support a workload approach to services, helping you balance the work you are given with the time you have. The webinar includes tips for scheduling your days and tracking your work for maximum impact, creative service delivery models, specific intervention ideas to take back and use immediately with students, and tips for advocating for a realistic and manageable workload.
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Turn the Page: Addressing Representation in Picture-Book Selection
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session from ASHA’s 2021 Schools Connect online conference provides tools for evaluating the picture books you currently use, equips you with arguments for why it is ethically important to use representative picture books and other materials, and helps you identify resources to develop a bookshelf that is aligned with your caseload composition. In addition, the presenters describe programs and strategies for implementing these selection practices into your everyday process. Gather the picture books that you most frequently use in intervention and have them with you when you watch the session.
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Mindfulness: A Guide for the School-Based SLP
Format(s): eWorkshop
The practice of mindfulness is more than a fad - it is key to managing stress, improving awareness, and acting with intentionality. This session from ASHA's 2021 Schools Connect online conference provides tools and guides you in building a regular practice of mindfulness. The presenter addresses common misconceptions of mindfulness practice and illustrates how mindfulness can help you respond to difficult situations from a place of nonjudgmental awareness and engagement rather than responding from impulse, overreaction, or habit.
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Managing Stress Using Mindfulness and Self-Care
Format(s): eWorkshop
During particularly stressful times, SLPs may wonder if they have chosen the wrong career, should look to switch job settings, or there is any way to manage the ever-growing stress around them. This session from ASHA's 2021 Schools Connect online conference examines where the stress comes from and shares stress management tools, such as mindfulness and self-care, that can reduce and manage this stress, so you can thrive in your work as an SLP.
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Help Young Adults With Language and Emotion Regulation Deficits Achieve Better Quality-of-Life Outcomes
Format(s): eWorkshop
Young adults with mild-to-moderate language impairments and low emotional intelligence often struggle to perform independently in mainstream adult settings. This session from ASHA's 2021 Schools Connect online conference discusses language and emotional intelligence skills that help post-secondary students achieve better quality-of-life outcomes. The speaker discusses strategies, activities, and resources that SLPs and their secondary students can use to improve outcomes. The session strives to reaffirm and refine SLPs' capacity to make a positive societal impact by serving this student population.
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Critically Analyzing Your Caseload
Format(s): eWorkshop
SLPs are charged with doing more with less time. This session from ASHA's 2021 Schools Connect online conference shares a way to address caseload and time challenges. The workload calculator is a tool that can be used to critically analyze an SLP's caseload. The speaker walks learners through using the tool so you can analyze your caseload to increase workload efficiency and productivity.
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Screenings, Assessments, and COVID-19 – Oh My!
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session from ASHA's 2021 Schools Connect online conference explores issues related to conducting screenings and assessments for speech-language services in schools. The speaker discusses ways to streamline the screening referral and assessment process, the SLP's role in Response to Intervention (RTI)/Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (MTSS), and how to address complications the COVID-19 pandemic has introduced related to managing screening and assessment needs in schools.
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Culturally Competent Service Delivery in Schools
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session from ASHA's 2021 Schools Connect online conference provides a foundation for understanding aspects of diversity, equity, and inclusion as they relate to service delivery in the school setting and beyond. The presenter shares case studies, strategies, and resources for best practices in providing culturally responsive services in the current social and public health context.
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Getting What You Need From Your Administrator
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session from ASHA's 2021 Schools Connect online conference shares five key tips for SLPs to use when communicating with school administrators. The presenter - a former school-based SLP who has been a district-level special education administrator for more than 10 years - provides key insights for preparing for and having discussions with administrators.
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Helping Families Act as Speech and Language Coaches
Format(s): eWorkshop
Coaching can happen anywhere, with any age child, no matter the communication disorder. This session from ASHA's 2021 Schools Connect online conference explores the power of coaching caregivers. The speaker discusses how to train family members and other facilitators to use speech-language intervention strategies with their children to produce better long-term outcomes.
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Evidence-Based Strategies to Alleviate Caseload- and Workload-Related Stress
Format(s): eWorkshop
Many factors can contribute to school SLPs feeling stressed and emotionally exhausted: large caseload sizes, innumerable paperwork responsibilities, minimal administrative and peer support, and conflicting roles within their work setting, to name a few. This recorded session from ASHA's 2021 Schools Connect online conference discusses and defines burnout, provides evidence-based strategies that you can implement immediately to reduce caseload- and workload-related stress, and provides examples of ways to advance change on caseload and workload issues on a larger scale.
Teleaudiology: An Introduction to Remote Services
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course is the first in a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice (telepractice) in audiology. This initial course explores audiologists' perceptions of barriers to providing telehealth services and introduces the Health Belief Model (HBM) and Transtheoretical model to assess readiness for remote service provision. The course includes an on-demand recording and a worksheet activity/tool to help you identify needs and barriers as you consider how you can incorporate teleaudiology into your practice.
Teleaudiology: Remote Screening and Diagnostics
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes two presentations that introduce strategies and tools for remote hearing assessment, including online and smartphone tests of hearing, remote pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and evaluation of peripheral and central auditory dysfunction in pediatric and adult populations. The course is part of a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
Teleaudiology: Providing Pediatric Audiology Services via Telehealth
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course demonstrates how Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center is using telehealth applications to address the needs of children with hearing loss during the COVID-19 pandemic and into the future, including remote hearing aid evaluations, fittings, programming, repairs, and functional benefit assessments. The course is one in a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
Teleaudiology: Auditory Processing Evaluation
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course presents a methodology that allows audiologists to provide (central) auditory processing testing remotely. The course discusses the advantages, disadvantages, and pitfalls of remote testing as well as technology and other requirements. The course is one in a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
Teleaudiology: Translating Adult Hearing Care Remotely – Hearing Aid Services
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course explores realistic scenarios audiologists may encounter when remotely fitting hearing aids for adults. The course discusses strategies for successful hearing aid fitting via teleaudiology and identifies challenges and how to address them when they occur. The course is one in a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
Teleaudiology: Policy Trends
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course provides an overview of policy issues and trends in audiologists' use of telepractice, including an overview of changes to state telepractice law implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic.  The course is one in a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology. 
Aural Rehabilitation: Achieving Functional Outcomes
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
There has been a renewed interest in the provision of aural rehabilitation (AR) services as part of patient-centered hearing health care. Aural rehabilitation is a holistic approach to the management of hearing loss that may include patient education, fitting of devices, and auditory training exercises. Although audiologists may recognize the benefits of comprehensive AR, questions may remain about how to measure functional outcomes of these services. This course reviews functional outcome assessments for aural rehabilitation and how to incorporate these measures into everyday practice to enhance patient success.
Management of Cognitive Symptoms of Mild TBI
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Concussion - or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) - is a unique injury that is different from more severe brain injury, and addressing the associated cognitive deficits requires personalized, targeted interventions These articles discuss research and practical implications for the management of cognitive symptoms of mTBI, including defining the role of the SLP on interdisciplinary management teams, exploring specific assessment and treatment strategies, and emphasizing functional, personalized goals. The articles are from a 2021 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology forum "Interdisciplinary Management of Concussion or Mild TBI." The articles provide evidence and strategies to increase clinician confidence and effectiveness when working with individuals with concussion or mTBI.
My Hearing Explained: Helping People Make Sense of Their Hearing Health
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Adults who are deaf or hard or hearing, as well as families of children with hearing conditions, often report that they struggle to understand the results of hearing assessments, make decisions about next steps, and convey the outcomes and implications to others. This course introduces the Ida Institute's new conversation guide, My Hearing Explained, a tool to help hearing care professionals (both audiologists and SLPs specializing in hearing care) present hearing test results in a person-centered way and help patients and their families make decisions that are right for them.
Techniques for Designing Courses, Examining Preferences, and Conducting Experiential Learning
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
Pedagogical practices in communication sciences and disorders have grown thanks in part to innovative techniques from other fields. The articles in this activity each present models that can be successfully incorporated into our discipline. Slavych describes models of backward course design—course development that starts by focusing on learning outcomes before considering content or teaching methods. Squires and Squires introduce best–worst scaling, a method for examining group preferences, and reported on how it can inform admissions practices. Speights Atkins et al. describe models of mentoring undergraduate research experiences and their applications in two communication sciences and disorders research labs. Finally, Perryman et al. examine the effects of a mixed-reality simulation in which actors playing parents interacted through computer avatars with undergraduate students carrying out clinical procedures.
Educational Needs Assessments Within Communication Sciences and Disorders
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
The articles included here examine the current state of education of three topics within our discipline. DeJarnette and Wegner report on the classroom and clinical training that graduate students in speech-language pathology receive in augmentative and alternative communication. Domholdt and Billings identify associations and disconnects within graduate programs’ interests and practices in teaching population health concepts—that is, clinical care regarding communities and large systems. Finally, Tucker et al. examine practicing audiologists’ and speech-language pathologists’ interests in obtaining a research-based PhD in communication sciences and disorders and barriers to starting and completing a doctoral program.
Leadership Academy: DEI and Volunteer Leadership
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Volunteer leaders are instrumental in implementing ASHA's strategic focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). The wide range of perspectives and backgrounds among members of most committees presents a challenge and opportunity for volunteer leaders. Some feel unsure about how to address issues associated with DEI. However, the multitude of voices, perspectives, and experiences can result in highly effective committees and outcomes when managed well. In this webinar, you will gain valuable insights on specific practices you can use as a volunteer to create an inclusive and safe environment to maximize your members’ engagement.
Contextualized Language Interventions for Secondary Students
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This SIG 1 Perspectives activity focuses on therapeutic interventions related to contextualized language for school age and adolescent students. The first article demonstrates how intervention can be designed to increase client motivation while targeting and improving language-based literacy skills. The second article is a tutorial that explains how to comprehensively address the development of collaborative academic conversations in older students with language delays and impairments. The third article provides a description of semantic reasoning as a vocabulary teaching tool that can be used to support contextualized language intervention. The fourth article describes how a written, graphic, and oral learning strategy called Sketch and Speak can be used to improve comprehension, retention, and expression of the ideas and language of expository texts. The final article focuses on how morphological awareness intervention can be linked to learning academic vocabulary within disciplinary literacy strategies.
Dysphagia Revelations: What We Know We Don’t Know and What Is Normal for Swallowing
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This trio of SIG 13 articles provides information regarding unique factions of dysphagia intervention. Sophia Werden Abrams, Harmonie S. J. Chan, Jasmeet Sikand, Heather Wilkie, and Kim Smith raise awareness for the importance of neurodegenerative disorder research involving dysphagia caused by oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy. Michela Jean Mir and Karen Wheeler Hegland aim to shed light on the subjective use of cough assessment and the importance and interest in formal clinical cough assessment training. Kendrea L. (Focht) Garand, Mary Catherine Reilly, Dahye Choi, Rajarshi Dey, Julie Estis, and Grayson Hill evaluate community dwelling adults using Modified Barium Swallow Impairment Profile components for bolus hold type to assist in defining typical swallowing behaviors.
Examining Challenges for Faculty and Students in Communication Sciences and Disorders Programs
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
The theme for this SIG 14 activity is examining challenges for faculty and students in communication sciences and disorders (CSD). Topics include (a) challenges faced by academic mothers in CSD programs; (b) challenges faced by faculty of color in CSD departments; and (c) examining microaggression endorsement in CSD students.
Increasing Equity and Inclusion for Minoritized Students and Faculty in Communication Sciences and Disorders
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
Ethnic and racial disparities within the fields of audiology and speech-language pathology have been well documented. Demographic data from the most recent ASHA survey revealed that 6.1% of ASHA members identify as Hispanic or Latino and 8.5% as “racial minorities.” These numbers are significantly below those of the overall U.S. population—16.3% and 27.6%, respectively, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The articles in this collection present models for increasing equity and inclusion across our disciple. Girolamo and Ghali introduce a student-led grassroots initiative that supports minority students at all levels. Mohapatra and Mohan propose a model for increasing student diversity and inclusion based on successful programs from other health-related disciplines. Finally, Mishra et al. examined three challenges that faculty of color face: cultural competency, imposter syndrome, and racial microaggressions.
Leadership Academy: Ethical Leadership and Civility
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Ethical leadership, anchored in transformational leadership theory, forms the basis for civility in the workplace. Embodying ethical leadership, ASHA’s focus on communication has resulted in research on declining civility nationally and its implications for members. This growing awareness has prompted ASHA to develop a suite of tools and resources for building and sustaining civility in the CSD professions. In this one-hour webinar, participants will explore ethical leadership, leadership purpose, and identifying ways to practice civility behaviors in their professional roles.
Leadership Academy: Leadership Communication
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Effective communication is a foundational leadership function and a vital characteristic of a competent leader. Given the unique role, leaders play in driving change and leading others through challenges, communication for leaders is much more complicated and nuanced than for individual contributors. Leaders who are skilled communicators create mutual understanding, harmony, and action by adapting their communication styles based on situational factors. Harnessing the power to communicate effectively is one of a leader's most critical skills, especially during crises or significant setbacks.
Leadership Academy: Managing Your Leadership Career
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Leaders who proactively manage their careers are often the most successful and resilient. Emerging trends in the CSD profession and the healthcare and education sectors are both a blessing and a curse. For proactive leaders, emerging trends are a source of exciting new opportunities. Instead of waiting for their boss to direct them to take a class or enhance their skills, proactive leaders make a conscious effort to assess, refresh and build their capabilities. Further, when faced with a promotion or expansion of their role, visionary leaders prepare for the transition using strategies to prevent derailment.
Leadership Academy: Resilient Leadership
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Leaders play an instrumental role in guiding their organizations through adversity, significant change, and crisis by maintaining their ability to persevere, rebound quickly from setbacks, maintain a positive attitude. The events of the past 18 months associated with the COVID pandemic have underscored how critical it is for leaders to sustain their grit and resilience. If not handled effectively, adversity can result in burnout, turnover, lost productivity, and poor performance. Influential leaders regularly invest in their resilience and support the ability of their followers to cope with tough times.
2022 Audiology Coding and Payment Update (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
In this on demand webinar, members of ASHA’s Health Care Economics Committee explain and discuss recent CPT and ICD-10-CM coding updates for audiologists and the 2022 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule, including payment changes and the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). Speakers present frequently asked coding and billing questions and review clinical examples to illustrate how audiologists should apply codes for proper coding and billing.
2022 SLP Coding, Payment, and Compliance Update (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar covers the latest speech-language pathology CPT and ICD-10 coding and payment updates and provides a targeted review of the 2022 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule and its impact on payment for speech-language pathology services. Speakers review key health care payment compliance guidelines related to coding, billing, and supervision as well as tackle complex coding, payment, claims, and compliance scenarios submitted by clinicians throughout the year.
A Tale of Two Articles: Adolescent Misophonia and Using Apps in Service Delivery for Children With Hearing Loss
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This activity has two articles with different foci. The misophonia case study is a contribution to the evidence base for use of sound therapy and coping strategies in treating and managing misophonia. It also shares available tools for diagnosing misophonia. The study about using learning applications in intervention for children with hearing loss shares results of a speech-language pathologists' focus group. The focus group centered on using speech and language application features, benefits, and concerns in school-based service delivery
Clinical Considerations for Working With Multicultural Populations in Schools and in the Community
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
The theme for this Perspectives activity is clinical considerations for working with multicultural populations in schools and the community. Topics include (a) assessment practices for multilingual children in schools, (b) school-based speech language pathologists working with interpreter-translators, and (c) factors associated with clear speech and accentedness in American English.
Interesting Discoveries in Adult Dysphagia Intervention: Screening, Evaluation, and Telehealth
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This assemblage of articles provides information on interesting topics encountered in adult dysphagia practice. Aarthi Madhavan, Nicole Shuman, Claire Snyder, and Nicole Etter provide insight on the comparative consistency of the Eating Assessment Tool and Sydney Swallow Questionnaire scores for self-reported swallowing difficulties in a group of community-dwelling older adults completing both questionnaires. Georgina Papadopoulos-Nydam, Jana Maureen Rieger, and Gabriela Constantinescu evaluate the usability of a mobile health (mHealth) system designed for dysphagia exercise in persons with a history of stroke. Renata Mancopes, Fernanda Borowsky da Rosa, Lidia Lis Tomasi, Adriane S. Pasqualoto, and Catriona M. Steele demonstrate concern for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and share information regarding dysphagia in people with COPD, synthesizing knowledge both from the literature and from studies performed in the context of a multidisciplinary clinical pulmonary rehabilitation program abroad. Additionally, Talia H. Schwartz brings to light the importance and utility of the clinical swallow evaluation while caring for patients with COVID-19.
Audiology Public Health: Navigating the Complexities of Ototoxicity Management
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Hundreds of medications commonly prescribed for anticancer treatments and some infections are known to cause auditory and/or vestibular dysfunction, known as ototoxicity. This course discusses early detection of ototoxicity through increased awareness, leveraging current tools, and clinical practice approaches for serial monitoring, all of which can provide care teams opportunities to identify adverse effects, modify treatment plans to mitigate hearing loss, and utilize individualized interventions. The speaker discusses strategies for preventing or minimizing cochlear damage to preserve quality of life for patients receiving treatment and to reduce the societal burden of hearing loss.
Interventions to Improve Conversation and Discourse Production for People With Aphasia
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study includes select papers on conversation and discourse production that were presented at the 49th Clinical Aphasiology Conference (2019) in Whitefish, Montana. The articles reflect the current state of research on treatments to improve conversation and discourse production for people with aphasia.
Targeting Literacy-Related Skills of Children With Autism
Format(s): Journal (Online)
The articles in this journal self-study discuss the literacy difficulties many children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience, with direct clinical implications for literacy assessment and intervention. The articles, which apply to children across the age spectrum, are from a 2021 forum published in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, titled “Literacy in Autism—Across the Spectrum.”
Gene Therapy: Current Promises and Future Challenges
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Gene therapy offers the promise to correct inherited forms of hearing loss as well as acquired forms such as noise-induced hearing loss, ototoxicity, and presbycusis. However, there are several barriers that must be overcome before such potential can be realized. This course describes the conceptual framework that governs gene therapy today, reveals how this framework has influenced current progress, and discusses a re-imagining of inner ear gene therapy with the goal of achieving outcomes that are clinically relevant and realistic.
Public Health and Audiology
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Communication and community are tightly connected, but audiologists don't often know how to apply our knowledge and skills to large populations of people. Audiologists can apply public health concepts to promote healthy hearing for people from all walks of life. This course discusses the field’s roots in public health, core concepts of public health (assessment, policy, and assurance), hearing health disparities, and ways to apply these concepts to support healthy communication in our own communities.
COVID-19: A Global Perspective
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These SIG 17 Perspectives articles focus on the impact of the COVID-19 global pandemic on service provision and student training in four global contexts: Cyprus, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Topics include the rise of telesupervision, telepractice in speech-language pathology (SLP), and distance learning in Cyprus during COVID-19; the effectiveness of SLP and related service treatment of patients with COVID-19 in an inpatient rehabilitation setting in the United States; the impact and transformation of an SLP university program in South Africa due to COVD19; and the perspectives of parents/caregivers on SLP service provision during COVID19 for children born with cleft palates in the United Kingdom.
Contemporary Issues: Augmentative & Alternative Communication Service Provision
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These SIG 12 Perspectives articles provide information on current issues associated with display design and image complexity for individuals with cortical visual impairment and an in-depth overview of telepractice for people who rely on augmentative and alternative communication. Readers will be more adept at assessing and assisting children with cortical visual impairment and will have a better understanding of telepractice methods that can be used to improve virtual service delivery.
Epidemiology and Boothless Audiology Service Delivery
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These SIG 8 Perspectives articles focus on topics that are important in promoting public health audiology. In “Fundamentals of Epidemiology for the Audiologist,” Torre and Reavis provide an overview of basic epidemiologic concepts including study design, prevalence, incidence, risk ratios, and odds ratios. The authors emphasize that an understanding of epidemiology is crucial for audiologists for a variety of reasons, including to help them assess the quality of publications, evaluate and discuss the efficacy of screening methods, and evaluate and communicate risk factors for ear and hearing problems. In “Hearing Health Care Delivery Outside the Booth,” Gates, Hecht, Grantham, Fallon, and Martukovich review the literature on boothless audiometry and introduce current tools used to deliver hearing health care outside of the traditional clinic setting. From their review, the authors conclude that boothless audiometry technology provides an opportunity for audiologists to expand services to nontraditional settings such as waiting grooms and nursing homes, increasing access to care, early identification, and intervention, and therefore improving health outcomes.
Patient-Centered Communication in Audiology
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
How can audiologists enhance patient-centered communication, even during the COVID-19 pandemic? This self-study is from the journal, Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, SIG 7: Auditory Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation. It features two articles focused on patient-centered strategies for effective communication, from initial consultations to prioritizing follow-up care, during COVID-19. It also includes the article that won the 2021 ASHA Journals Editor’s Award for Perspectives (for SIGs 6, 7, 8, and 9) by Davidson and Marrone. The first article is, “How to Provide Accessible Hearing Health Information to Promote Patient-Centered Care.” Kelly-Campbell and Manchaiah review the literature within audiology on patient-provider communication. They focus on research studies of communication during initial audiology consultation sessions. Through a summary of themes in the literature, they categorize important research findings that provide insight into communication between patients and their audiologists. Finally, they identify five key strategies for effective patient-centered communication. Each strategy is then reviewed in detail, with clinical examples and specific recommendations that can be immediately implemented in practice. The second article is, “A Clinically Valuable Interaction in the Midst of COVID-19 and Beyond: A Viewpoint on the Importance of Patient-Centered Outcomes in Rehabilitative Audiology.” Davidson and Marrone discuss patient-centered communication following hearing aid device fittings. They identify challenges facing patients and audiologists related to follow-up hearing aid services as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on a literature review and their own recent research, they developed a decision-tree algorithm to help audiologists prioritize clinical activities following hearing aid fittings, including remote formats for care. The algorithm was based on use of a patient-centered outcome measure, the Measure of Audiologic Rehabilitation Self-Efficacy. Patient-centered outcomes measurement is suggested as an engagement strategy for continued communication with patients during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.
Promoting Mental Health for School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists & Students
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
Upon entering into a new school year, this SIG 16 Perspectives activity highlights some of the realities faced by school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and their students. Across all articles, readers will learn of the challenges that are all too often experienced by SLPs and our students, as well as recommendations for how to increase satisfaction with school-based positions, reduce burnout, and increase the mental health, representation, and motivation of our students. In the first article, the authors (Amir, Jones, Frankel, & Fritzch) report survey results that found that although school-based SLPs are satisfied with their relationships with students, they continue to experience challenges, especially related to caseload/workload and others’ misunderstanding of the roles and responsibilities of the SLP. This article is followed by a tutorial from Marante and Farquharson, in which they provide tips to address some of these challenges and reduce feelings of burnout and overwhelm, providing helpful checklists in the appendices. In the remaining three articles, authors outline ways for school-based SLPs to further support our students. The first of these articles, by Hoff and Unger, describes how to collaborate with mental health providers to address some of the unique social-emotional needs of students who stutter. Harris and Owen Van Horne, in the subsequent article, address how to include more diverse materials within therapy sessions so that the lived experiences of all students are more accurately portrayed and represented. Lastly, Abendroth and Whited discuss ways to support older students who are transitioning into adulthood, giving readers several ideas for how to increase students’ motivation, further develop rapport, and provide models of problem solving and resiliency.
Expanding Educational Opportunities in CSD Programs
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
In this activity, four recent SIG 10 articles are presented. First, Domsch, Stiritz, and Huff utilized a mixed-methods design to examine the cultural awareness of students in communication sciences and disorders (CSD) during and after a study-abroad experience. Next, Franca, Boyer, and Pegoraro-Krook explored activities designed to promote cultural and clinical competence in a collaboration between CSD programs in the United States and Brazil. Then, Veyvoda and Van Cleave reviewed the literature on service-learning and community-engaged learning, described how these approaches could be used in distance-learning modalities, and explored how doing so could be accomplished during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, Towson et al. studied the effectiveness of coaching paired with the use of a mixed-reality simulator as CSD students practiced interprofessional communication skills in role-play scenarios.
Impact of Allergies on Sleep in Stuttering; Using Solution-Focused Principles
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These articles show the breadth of topics relevant to the understanding and treatment of fluency and fluency disorders. The articles include topics on the impact of allergies on the sleep of children who stutter and using solution-focused principles to elicit perspectives on therapeutic change in older children who stutter and their parents.
Clinical Considerations for Children and Adults From CLD Backgrounds
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
The theme for this Perspectives activity is clinical considerations in assessment of children and adults from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds and providing culturally supporting treatment settings. Topics include (a) acoustic parameters of retroflex sounds, (b) the two-question method for assessing gender identity, (c) assessment recommendations for new language learners, and (d) creating culturally supportive settings to foster literacy development.
Advances in Hearing Diagnostics, Treatment, & Prevention
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These three articles describe current issues and advances related to hearing diagnostics, treatment, and prevention. The first article is a detailed description of the impact that COVID-19 face masks and social distancing regulations have had on speech recognition and how face masks affect the acoustic signal and increase cognitive effort in listeners with hearing loss. Suggestions for mitigating these deleterious impacts on communication are provided. The second article is a research study examining the correlation between self-perceived hearing difficulty, determined using a questionnaire (Adult Auditory Performance Scale), and speech-in-noise performance (Listening in Spatialized Noise–Sentences Test) in listeners with normal pure-tone thresholds. Results highlight the relationship between self-perceived hearing abilities and binaural speech-in-noise performance supporting the inclusion of speech-in-noise testing even in those with normal pure-tone thresholds. The third article is a review of current genetic, stem cell, and pharmacotherapy research for treatment and prevention of hearing loss. Animal models are discussed, as well as steps to translate this research into clinical practice.
Hearing Loss Prevention: A Moral Obligation for Audiologists
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Noise is prevalent in everyday life, and the general population lacks awareness of the risks of hazardous noise exposure and strategies to reduce noise-induced hearing loss. By integrating hearing loss prevention education into patient encounters and taking advantage of outreach/education opportunities, audiologists can help reduce the prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss. This course discusses the why, where, and how of integrating prevention education into your practice.
Business Costs in Health Care: Labor, Productivity, and Impact on SLPs
Format(s): eWorkshop
This panel discussion, featuring managers/administrators from skilled nursing facility/home health and private practice health care settings, explores productivity expectations within the framework of the business of health care, recognizing that the three largest costs for any health care business are labor management, infrastructure management, and health care reimbursement.
Moral Distress and the SLP’s Game: Put Burnout on the Run
Format(s): eWorkshop
Many SLPs in health care settings feel as though they are slowly losing “the game” and experiencing career burnout. This session explores moral distress and how it can impact the SLP’s long game. The speaker addresses difficult situations that SLPs confront daily in their health care careers and shares useful tools to get to the root of your moral distress. The session will help you develop a new game plan with strategies to come out with a win.
Technology Access and Telepractice: Who Gets Left Behind?
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session describes health disparities relevant to telehealth access in older adults and individuals who live in rural areas. Presenters highlight resources to help overcome telehealth access barriers with these populations and discuss the clinician’s role in advocacy.
To Whom Should I Listen and Where Should I Go? Developing Critical Thinking Skills
Format(s): eWorkshop
The amount of information available to clinicians is enormous. Type a few terms into Google, and thousands of options appear; post a question on social media, and a plethora of responses emerge. Obtaining information is not an issue, but how do you wade through when there is no consensus? Using examples SLPs encounter in their work in health care settings, this session explores tools for evaluating and analyzing information and developing critical thinking skills.
Uncovering Your Superpowers
Format(s): eWorkshop
At some stages in your career, you may ask yourself, “Do I want to be doing this?” This question can start you down a path of personal discovery to find fulfillment in your career. In this session, learn how to identify and communicate your unique transferable skills and talents—i.e., superpowers—to find new opportunities, expand your influence at work, and/or grow your professional brand.
Emotion/Attention Issues & Stuttering: Podcasts, Stereotypes, Covert Stuttering
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This activity is a grouping of studies related to the understanding stuttering throughout the life span. The activity is based on articles related to attentional focus on motor control in people who stutter (PWS) and the relationship to social stress, acoustic measures of emotion in children who stutter, a study of covert stuttering throughout the lifespan, vocational stereotyping of PWS by human resource preprofessionals, and audio-based podcasts to assist in self-help for PWS. Together, these articles investigate important measures in understanding stuttering and how researchers and clinicians can better understand the condition of stuttering.
Dyslexia in the Schools: What Is the SLP’s Role?
Format(s): eWorkshop
This recorded session from ASHA’s 2021 Schools Connect online conference explores what dyslexia is and what the SLP’s role can be in prevention, identification, and intervention. Legislation varies widely across and within U.S. states regarding roles and responsibilities when it comes to diagnosing and treating dyslexia. The speaker shares resources for how to determine your state’s dyslexia legislation as well as tips for advocating for services for students with dyslexia.
Effective Relationships in Supervisory and Work Settings
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This SIG 11 Perspectives activity presents two unique articles related to enhancing relationships in supervisory and work settings. The first article highlights specific skills sets required for clinical providers and describes primary performance indicators (PPIs) that are critical to building effective working relationships. In the second article, the authors detail the findings of a study on similarities and differences in work ethic among three generations of speech-language pathologists.
Hiding in Plain Sight: Ensuring Proper Diagnosis of Autistic Girls
Format(s): eWorkshop
Autism can present quite differently in boys and girls, and research demonstrates that many girls and women are being misdiagnosed or missed entirely. In this recorded session from ASHA’s 2021 Schools Connect online conference, the presenter explores the subtle presentation of autism in general and the specific ways that girls and women can present. The speaker discusses the importance of a comprehensive social cognition assessment to increase the likelihood of proper autism diagnosis.
Improving Outcomes for Students with Severe Disabilities
Format(s): eWorkshop
School-based SLPs who serve students with severe disabilities face unique challenges related to student outcomes, intervention planning, and workload. This recorded session from ASHA’s 2021 Schools Connect online conference explores ways to support student outcomes while balancing workload concerns. The presenter discusses long-term student outcomes, writing SMART IEP goals, and an integrated intervention approach, as well as strategies to implement these ideas in your workplace.
Integrating Speech and Language Interventions Into Classrooms
Format(s): eWorkshop
This recorded session from ASHA’s 2021 Schools Connect online conference provides practical, time-saving strategies for integrating speech and language services into classrooms. The speaker discusses strategies that are easily transferrable to face-to-face and consultative service delivery models, with a focus on specific ideas that SLPs can take back and use immediately.
Mindfulness in Ethics: The Code at Work in Schools
Format(s): eWorkshop
The concept of mindfulness—which can improve professional and personal outlook—focuses on three major features: intention, attention, and attitude. This recorded session from ASHA’s 2021 Schools Connect online conference answers the question: What if school-based professionals apply the three features of mindfulness to understanding ASHA’s Code of Ethics and daily ethical practice? The presenter highlights the four major principles of the Code of Ethics as they relate to daily practice; discusses considerations outside the school (e.g., state licensure boards and employee guidelines) that are relevant to ethics analysis; and reviews school-based scenarios that apply the Code of Ethics and ethical decision-making.
Online Organizational Resources for Today’s School SLP
Format(s): eWorkshop
School-based SLPs who serve elementary-age students juggle many changing responsibilities. This recorded session from ASHA’s 2021 Schools Connect online conference shares helpful online resources to stay organized and efficient while navigating multiple service delivery scenarios.
Speech Sound Treatment: A Look at Three Evidence-Based Approaches
Format(s): eWorkshop
This recorded session from ASHA’s 2021 Schools Connect online conference reviews three evidence-based approaches to selecting and contrasting two or more sounds during speech sound disorder treatment: minimal pair (one misarticulated sound paired with its typical substitution), maximal opposition (two misarticulated sounds that differ greatly from one another), and multiple opposition (multiple misarticulated sounds that are all replaced within the same substitute). The speaker shares evidence supporting each treatment approach and uses hypothetical clinical cases to illustrate sound selection and treatment activities.
Using a Balanced Literacy Approach With Preschool–1st Grade Children
Format(s): eWorkshop
This recorded session from ASHA’s 2021 Schools Connect online conference presents an evidence-based balanced literacy approach as a model for assessment and intervention that targets aspects of literacy beyond decoding and comprehension, such as morphology and orthography. The presenter also discusses considerations for culturally responsive assessment and intervention.
Emerging Tools and Methodologies in Teleaudiology
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Even before the COVID-19 pandemic required clinicians to rapidly adapt their practice for remote service provision, researchers were already exploring effective telehealth approaches for audiology. The articles in this journal self-study (selected from a special issue of the American Journal of Audiology, “4th International Meeting on Internet and Audiology”) examine teleaudiology tools and methodologies for hearing screenings, home-based auditory assessment for people who use cochlear implants, assessing hearing aid outcomes using ecological momentary assessment (EMA), and a tool for evaluating hearing aid performance.
Supervising SLPAs: Let the Collaboration Begin! (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Busy SLPs need solutions that support quality care within the time and resources available to them every day. Collaboration with speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs) can maintain the integrity of services and continuity of care for patients, clients, and students and allow the SLP to practice at “the top of their license/certification.” However, for many SLPs, the thought of supervising an assistant comes with questions and concerns. This on demand webinar provides a framework for supervision and a discussion on how to ensure it’s a collaborative relationship for all stakeholders.
Clinical Practices for Aphasia
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These SIG 2 articles focus on clinical assessment and practices for individuals with aphasia. Topics covered included challenges associated with diagnosing primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and the impact of adaptive yoga programs for persons with aphasia. First, Aimee Dietz, E. Susan Duncan, Lauren Bislick, Sarah Stegman, Jenna Collins, Chitrali Mamlekar, Rachel Gleason, and Michael J. McCarthy provide an overview of the potential impact adapted yoga programs can have for people with stroke-induced aphasia. Second, Adithya Chandregowda raises awareness about the challenges associated with encountering primary progressive aphasia (PPA) patients in the acute hospital setting.
From Education to Incarceration: Empowering SLPs to Break the Cycle (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar explores methods and strategies that school-based SLPs can use to improve educational access for populations identified as at-risk for being entangled in the school-to-confinement pipeline. The course supports SLPs in identifying key features and implications of the school-to-confinement pipeline by examining historical, legal, philosophical, and sociocultural factors that contribute to it. The course equips SLPs to increase other educational stakeholders’ awareness of issues pertaining to the school-to-confinement pipeline.
Diagnostic Measures for Velopharyngeal Function
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This Perspectives activity highlights two articles with objective measures for both evaluation and treatment of velopharyngeal dysfunction. The first article discusses the palatal closure efficiency (PaCE) index. This is an aerodynamic tool used to estimate the velopharyngeal opening during certain speech contexts. This is done by measuring a percentage of change between nasal and oral cognates of an individual. The second article describes the nasometer in depth, highlighting its use as an evaluation and treatment tool for decreasing hypernasality. It goes into further detail on the differences between hypernasality and measured nasalance, highlighting both strengths and limitations of the nasalance score.
Language Awareness and Literacy Success for Adolescents (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar explores the foundational theory and key components of a language-based literacy model to guide assessment and intervention for adolescents who struggle with language and/or literacy development. The speaker discusses a multilinguistic literacy approach—i.e., a focus of explicit reflection on the foundational skills of sounds (phonology), letters (orthography), meaning (morphology), vocabulary (semantics), and grammar (syntax) in the context of written language. The webinar discusses variations of this type of language-focused literacy approach to improve the literacy skills of adolescents at risk for and diagnosed with developmental language disorders, dyslexia, and reading comprehension and spelling deficits.
A Myriad of Dysphagia Interventions: NICU, Cultural Humility, Instrumentation, Nursing, Tracheostomy Tubes, and Technology
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This collection of articles presents clinicians with evidence on a variety of topics in dysphagia that can be utilized in practice immediately. Alaina Martens and Emily Zimmerman offer insight regarding changes to feeding patterns in infants diagnosed with bronchopulmonary dysplasia after prolonged oxygen therapy in the newborn intensive care unit. Paula Leslie and colleagues provide a framework of health and illness and how food and drink are much more. They stress the importance of clinician appreciation as a cultural guest in our patients’ lives. Bonnie Martin-Harris and colleagues stress the importance of instrumentation with a thorough review of available practice guidelines and appropriateness criteria issued to date, revealing a deficit of up-to-date, comprehensive, evidence-based information on the diagnosis and evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Specifically, a lack of quality guidance on the ordering, performance, and reporting of the modified barium swallow study has hindered efforts to improve standardization and ensure quality continuity of care. Naomi Gurevich and colleagues stress the need to clarify guidelines and increase interprofessional education between both professions to improve patient care. George Barnes and Nancy Toms highlight speech-language pathologists’ need for a solid foundation of knowledge when it comes to patients with highly complex disease processes and care plans. Deirdre Muldoon and colleagues conduct a review of published literature regarding management of feeding difficulties at the oral phase of feeding in children with autism spectrum disorder and/or developmental disability. Finally, Paul M. Evitts and colleagues reveal a potential way to track aspiration in healthy adults using an app.
Pediatric Feeding: Small Steps, Big Changes (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
SLPs who work with children with feeding disorders often face challenges when managing oral hypersensitivities or advancing a child’s diet due to refusal behaviors. This on demand webinar explores the question, “What can I do when oral-sensory-motor deficits and difficult behaviors intersect?” The speaker discusses factors to consider when evaluating children with behavioral feeding disorders as well as uses video examples to illustrate and discuss various treatment strategies.
Speech Audiometry for Linguistically Diverse Populations (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
The likelihood of encountering multilingual individuals, non-English-speaking individuals, and non-native speakers of English in the clinic is becoming more common. As audiologists are working with linguistically diverse populations, they may find themselves asking, “How should I evaluate speech perception in my patients who are not monolingual speakers of English? Which speech materials should I use?” This on demand webinar reviews the current literature on multilingual and non-native speech perception and discusses approaches to best serve patients from diverse linguistic backgrounds.
Supervision for School-Based SLPs
Format(s): eWorkshop
It’s not a matter of "if" but rather "when" the school-based SLP assumes the role of a supervisor. Supervision may include directing the activities of support personnel, helping graduate students connect academic knowledge and clinical procedures, or monitoring the activities of clinical fellows to achieve independence. This recorded session from ASHA’s 2021 Schools Connect online conference explains the key elements of the supervisory process and defines the roles and responsibilities of both the supervisor and the supervisee in the school setting. The speaker discusses relationship development, communication, and the role and influence of supervisory style on supervisee performance and decision-making.
Quality of Life in Communication Among the Elderly
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
Three articles have been grouped, all centering around quality of life: at end of life, following a stroke, and among individuals with voice disorders. In “Facilitating End-of-Life Interaction Between Patients With Severe Communication Impairment and Their Families,” the authors acknowledge the work that has been done previously and recently in outlining the role of the speech-language pathologist in dysphagia and communication at end of life. One case study is presented, which describes an end-of-life scenario following a stroke. Post–case study review, the authors include reflections, counseling points for clinicians related to the case study, and counseling points in the form of a handout that could be used as a resource for clinicians. Given that existing research on the impacts of stroke is primarily conducted within a 5-year period following the stroke, the authors of “Quality of Life Following Stroke: A Qualitative Study Across 30 Years” seek to understand the long-term effects. They draw data from 28 years of journals that were kept by the participant and conduct semistructured family interviews. The authors draw four themes from the data—family support, faith, personality, and journaling—as having influence over the participant’s long-term experience poststroke. Within the discussion, the authors examine the World Health Organization’s Quality of Life Factors and the participant’s experience through the lens of the resilience theory. Among aging individuals, voice disorders (including presbyphonia) are commonly reported—however, treated less proportionately. “Perceived Voice Disorders in Older Adults and Impact on Social Interactions” uses a cross-sectional investigation approach by examining the findings of three assessments on 332 community dwelling individuals aged 60 and older. The authors conclude that voice disorders increase with age and, conversely, social interactions requiring communication decrease among individuals with voice disorders. As a result, health-care professionals are encouraged to educate older individuals on how and why to seek management of a voice disorder by a speech-language pathologist or qualified medical professional.
Innovations for Telepractice Success in a School Setting (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Many school-based SLPs discovered the benefits of telepractice during the rapid shift to remote service provision in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. This on demand webinar discusses the essential components of providing quality telepractice services so professionals can continue providing impactful services in this manner. The speaker discusses advocating for telepractice in your district; relevant legal and regulatory issues; and innovative, evidence-based models for school service delivery via telepractice.
Treating R Errors: Evidence-Based Cueing and Practice Strategies (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Persisting /r/ distortions are common speech sound errors for many children and adolescents. This on demand webinar describes /r/ intervention approaches that are rooted in sound science about the phonetics of /r/, basic principles of speech motor control, and evidence-based solutions.
Morphological Instruction for All: Supporting Linguistically Diverse Students (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This webinar focuses on the importance of morphological instruction to support reading and language development for all students—and specific advantages, tools, and strategies for English learners (ELs) or dual language learners (DLLs) with language and reading disorders.
Progressive Topics for Consideration: Ageism, Systems of Oppression in Geriatrics, and Health Disparities
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
Three progressive cultural topics are examined as they relate to speech-language pathology and audiology. Because negative feelings toward the elderly can result in adverse effects in healthcare settings, in “Ageism Among Graduate Students in Communication Sciences and Disorders: A Longitudinal Analysis,” Heape et al. tested 80 graduate students in speech-language pathology to determine the presence and level of ageism using the Fraboni Scale of Ageism. They conclude that positive impacts could be gained by development of graduate curriculum that encompasses all age groups, including the elderly. In “Systems of Oppression in Geriatric Clinical Service Delivery,” Kendall builds on previous work related to forms of oppression by defining institutional, symbolic, and individual systems of oppression. Additionally, she provides clinical examples specific to working in communication sciences disorders settings and suggestions as to how clinicians can disrupt oppression in the workplace. In “The Complexity of Health Disparities: More Than Just Black–White Differences,” Ellis and Jacobs bring health disparities back to light given the recent findings from 2020 indicating that Hispanic and African Americans are more than twice as likely to die from COVID-19 than White Americans. They provide definitions, review vulnerable populations and the interaction between social determinants and health disparities, and provide suggestions on how to achieve equity.
“The Fool Speaks, the Wise Man Listens”: Supporting African American Stroke Survivors With Aphasia
Format(s): eWorkshop
For stroke survivors with aphasia (SWA), language recovery is highly variable given the extent to which damage may exist in multiple neighboring brain regions. For African American SWA, social determinants of health also contribute to stroke recovery and aphasia rehabilitation, and SLPs can play a vital role in ensuring health equity. This session discusses evidence-based practices that holistically support neurorehabilitation for African American SWA, focusing on assessment, intervention, and culturally competent service provision that targets health-related quality of life and health literacy.
Embracing Transformation: Become a Catalyst for Change
Format(s): eWorkshop
SLPs practicing in health care provide services within a largely for-profit system in the U.S. Consequently, the business needs of health care, challenges related to reimbursement and advocacy, and disparities in health care access have resulted in a need to adapt clinical practice to future trends while rethinking career growth and advancement in the field. This session contextualizes the challenges in the practice of medical speech-language pathology and provides practical ideas to facilitate change in your realms of influence at your job and beyond.
Empowering SLPs to Adopt Telepractice for Dysphagia Care
Format(s): eWorkshop
While the use of telepractice for dysphagia management has increased considerably due to restrictions on in-person practice during the COVID-19 pandemic, challenges still exist. This session discusses the remaining barriers to the adoption of telehealth for dysphagia services and ways to overcome them. The speaker explains an evaluation and decision-making process clinicians can use to determine if the adoption of telepractice for dysphagia care is right for them and discusses ways to advocate for and start developing telepractice models of care in a variety of health care settings.
Ensuring Language Access in Health Care Settings
Format(s): eWorkshop
An increasingly diverse United States means that clinicians are encountering more languages in hospital settings. SLPs and audiologists have a legal and ethical responsibility to ensure language access—that is, to actively bridge communication challenges between clinicians and patients/families who do not speak, understand, read, or write in the same language. This session discusses language access law and solutions for situations in which a trained medical interpreter is unavailable.
Ethics in Social Media Engagement
Format(s): eWorkshop
Like many other professionals, SLPs often use social media for the exchange of professional information as well as for personal engagement. Posting of client-related information, uncivil remarks, misrepresentation of services, and/or defamatory claims—whether intentional or unintentional—may cross the boundaries of ethical and legal behavior. This session discusses myths surrounding social media, considerations for posting, and potential consequences of inappropriate use.
The Interrelationship Between Policy and Clinical Practice
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session explores how policy and clinical practice impact each other. The presenters discuss the making of public policy, and how it is interpreted and implemented into clinical practice in health care settings. The presenters also discuss the flip side—how clinical practice itself informs advocacy for shaping future public policy. Learners can think about their professional roles in interpreting policy and advocating for change.
The Political and Public Policy Landscape and the Future of Medical Speech-Language Pathology
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session provides an overview of the 2021 political and public policy landscape, including issues of importance before the presidential administration, Congress, and the states. The presenter discusses the impact these issues have on the future of the medical SLP and highlights the advocacy efforts ASHA is currently undertaking, empowering participants to advocate for positive change.
Education, Considerations, and Techniques in Gender Affirming Voice Care
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
In this series of articles, the need for clear guidelines in graduate education on the topic of transgender voice and communication is explored through an e-survey. Considerations for culturally competent voice care is presented in the context of two case studies. Case studies are also used to highlight the importance of an interdisciplinary gender affirming approach for successful voice care with adolescence. In the final article, a voice technique is adapted for voice masculinization.
Strengths-Based Approaches to Promoting Engagement in School-Age Children With ASD (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar will help fill up your toolbox of strategies to help children with autism spectrum disorder engage in learning and social interactions. The webinar will share practical, visual-based tools that SLPs who work with school-age children with autism can use to build on strengths and promote participation, engagement, and relationships.
Communication Choice and Agency: Thinking Beyond  Spoken Language for Individuals on the Autism  Spectrum
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This Perspectives activity focuses on communication choice and agency for individuals on the autism spectrum. These individuals are the key informants in decisions around the conceptualization, implementation, and evaluation of educational programming for autistic learners. Speaking autistic adults encourage families, professionals, and society to promote and accept all communication as equal.
Language and Literacy Intervention Topics for Children  With Hearing Loss and Deafness
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This activity includes two articles related to language and literacy intervention for children with hearing loss and deafness. In the first article, Stephanie Mary Raymond and Tring D. Spencer investigate the effect of narrative language intervention on the narrative retelling skills and vocabulary use of children with hearing loss. In the second article, Krystal L. Werfel and Sarah Lawrence describe specific considerations for print-referencing interventions for children with hearing loss along with a case study. The respective authors conclude that print referencing, with specific considerations for children with hearing loss, may be an effective emergent literacy intervention to increase conceptual print knowledge for children preschool-age with hearing loss; and narrative intervention is promising for facilitating language skills improvement for children with hearing loss. Both studies require replication for their findings.
Respiratory Muscle Strength Training: Evidence and Protocols (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Behavioral interventions that provide a calibrated mode for strengthening inspiratory and expiratory muscles are limited and often non-evidence-based. This on demand webinar discusses the evidence base for respiratory muscle strength training (RMST) devices and shares the assessment and treatment protocols necessary for valid implementation of respiratory muscle strength training protocols. The course will be useful for SLPs working in health care settings treating acute and chronic conditions that impact the functions of breathing, coughing, swallowing, and vocalizing that result from skeletal muscle weakness.
Using Telepractice for Evaluation and Intervention for Neurogenic Communication Disorders (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
SLPs across work settings face challenges associated with adapting their current evaluation and treatment methods to telepractice. This on demand webinar will discuss adaptations and evidence-based practices for using telepractice to effectively assess and treat individuals with neurogenic communication disorders.
Childhood Maltreatment Consequences on Social Pragmatic and Literacy Skills
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This activity focuses on the childhood maltreatment consequences on social pragmatic communication. Based on a complex family and social conception of neglect, a logical model illustrating public health services for children experiencing neglect is proposed. The role of speech-language pathology in prevention, policy, and practice is outlined. The importance of assessing the narrative language of children exposed to complex trauma is also emphasized.
Reading Disorder Identification and Intervention: Supporting Biliteracy in Dual Language Learners (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Two big challenges in evaluating dual language learners with reading disorders are determining the (1) best testing tools and (2) language for assessment. This webinar explores specific components of a reading assessment for children who are bilingual and shares interventions that can facilitate reading across languages.
Novelty in School-Based Evaluation, Treatment, and Roles
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This SIG 16 Perspectives activity highlights novel approaches to eligibility decision-making, intervention, and the roles and responsibilities of school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs). In the first article, the authors present a novel approach to evaluation and eligibility. Farquharson, Coleman, Moore, and Montgomery showcase how SLPs can utilize and apply a design thinking framework when making eligibility recommendations for children with oral and written language disorders. The authors give two sample eligibility predicaments and give examples of five design thinking questions (discovery, interpretation, ideation, experimentation, evolution) for each scenario. In the second article, we learn about a novel approach to intervention. Here, Page and Johnson provide a summary of electropalatographic therapy for the remediation of speech sound disorders. They also systematically reviewed the literature to summarize the extent to which this intervention technique is supported for use with children with Down syndrome. Lastly, the last group of authors discuss novel roles and responsibilities that school-based SLPs may assume. In this article, Seal and Power-deFur discuss the similarities and differences between a fact witness and an expert witness, while also providing school-based professionals with ideas of how to prepare for these roles if called to testify in a special education dispute or civil litigation case.
Clinical, Research, Linguistic, and Technical Considerations in Telepractice
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This activity presents a variety of topics related to telepractice service provision. The first article offers a case study on the effects of a hybrid telepractice/onsite treatment program for a child who stutters. The following article discusses common technical issues encountered during telepractice and a process for managing them with English- and Spanish-speaking clients. The final article details the findings of a study on integrating technology through telepractice to support clients with dementia.
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A Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Approach to AAC
Format(s): eWorkshop
In this session, the speaker reviews the characteristics of culturally and linguistically responsive AAC practices and presents evidence-based strategies for culturally appropriate bilingual AAC assessment and intervention. The speaker discusses partnering with families to determine values, needs, priorities, and resources when implementing AAC. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
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AAC Intervention as Language Intervention: Building on What You Know
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session explores how to adapt traditional speech-language practices to serve students who use AAC systems. The session demonstrates analyzing language samples from a student using an AAC system and then developing goals and intervention activities to address development in the areas of pragmatics, phonology, vocabulary, and grammar. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
An Extension of Your Professional Self: SLPAs in Private Practice
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session provides insights and resources from two companies that have employed SLPAs in a variety of ways. The speaker discusses the necessity and appropriate utilization of professionals at this level of service and explores ideas for integrating SLPAs in private practice. This is a recorded session from ASHA’s 2020 Private Practice Connect conference.
Assessments and Interventions in the Schools for Youth With Brain Injury
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session—a recorded session from ASHA’s 2020 Schools Connect conference—focuses on the continued rehabilitation of students with brain injuries through the art of successful transition into the school setting. The speaker addresses how accurate assessment leads to the establishment and implementation of successful intervention plans that include educationally relevant goals. This session is designed to accompany the 2020 Health Care Connect online conference session Initial Assessment and Transition Planning for Youth With Brain Injury. Together, the two sessions address provision of services for the same students across medical and school settings.
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Building Early Communication Skills: Matching AAC Strategies to Developmental Needs
Format(s): eWorkshop
Learning to gesture or use aided AAC for intentional communication with a partner is challenging for some infants and toddlers with complex communication needs. This session explores a variety of intervention strategies that improve pre-intentional and intentional communication skills using various AAC modalities and some of which incorporate families and caregivers. The speaker shares live illustrations and video examples of young children who have various difficulties with pre-intentional communication and problem solves about how intervention can structure the learner’s experiences to fill in gaps. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
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Effective Practices in AAC Assessment
Format(s): eWorkshop
Given the landscape of hundreds of apps, speech-generating devices, low-tech options, and no-tech strategies, SLPs who do not typically complete AAC assessments may wonder who to refer for an AAC an assessment and how they can contribute to the assessment process. This session reviews the AAC assessment process, with an emphasis on feature matching and consideration of the individual’s current and future needs. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
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Effective, Engaging AAC Instruction

Out of stock
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session explores tools, strategies, and a framework to enhance engagement, learning, and generalization for students who use AAC. The speakers discuss various ways to support students’ learning and communication with peers, including using social communication games, combining core vocabulary and literacy, and determining authentic purposes. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
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Engaging and Manageable School-Based AAC Telepractice
Format(s): eWorkshop
AAC teletherapy can be fun, engaging, and effective with the right tools and strategies. This session provides guidance on setting up AAC systems for modeling during virtual sessions as well as tools SLPs can use to view a student's AAC device virtually. The speaker explores free and low-cost telepractice materials to increase student engagement and make planning more manageable. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
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Improving AAC Implementation With Effective Collaboration
Format(s): eWorkshop
Effective collaboration among individuals who use AAC and their families, communication partners at school/work, and those in the community can promote positive outcomes for the AAC communicators. This session defines what successful information exchanges can look like and explores who in the community an SLP may want to include as collaborators. The presenter shares strategies for effective and efficient collaboration across the AAC communicator’s family, school/work life, and broader community. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
Initial Assessment and Transition Planning for Youth With Brain Injury
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session—a recorded session from ASHA’s 2020 Health Care Connect online conference—explores the incidence and common mechanisms of brain injury in children and adolescents and the potential effects of these injuries to cognition and communication. Using case studies, the speaker discusses methods to improve long-term outcomes for these youth through initial assessment and transition planning. This session is designed to accompany the 2020 Schools Connect online conference session Assessments and Interventions in the Schools for Youth With Brain Injury. Together, the two sessions address provision of services for the same students across medical and school settings.
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Integrating AAC in School Settings
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session discusses strategies to incorporate AAC throughout a student’s school day to increase their expressive output over a variety of communication opportunities. The speaker presents ideas for creating a systematic integration plan and discusses strategies that can work with low- or high-tech AAC systems to prompt expressive communication initiations, topic maintenance, and appropriate conversation redirection and termination. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
Moving Toward a Robust AAC System
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session examine the often-daunting process of moving a child who is minimally verbal or nonverbal from a basic to a full-featured AAC system. The session covers the selection, use, and goal-setting process for a basic, functional communication and language development system while planning for assessment for and implementation of a fuller system. The speaker shares suggestions for designing effective intervention sessions and ideas for helping the team get on board. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
Roles and Responsibilities of an Expert Witness
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session is designed for SLPs from any work setting who are considering serving, or have been asked to serve, as an expert witness. The speakers introduce the role of an expert witness, in contrast to the role of a fact witness, and review the qualifications and distinctive roles and responsibilities of an expert witness, with a focus on relevant laws (e.g., HIPAA, FERPA, IDEA, and ADA). The session—a recorded session from ASHA’s 2020 Private Practice Connect online conference—includes discussion of oral and written communication best practices, as they are fundamental to the role of an expert witness. The speakers also use case studies to highlight key concepts.
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Setting Goals for Students Who Use AAC
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session explores the process of selecting and crafting measurable goals that are appropriate for students learning to communicate using AAC. The speaker reviews the AAC competency categories, shares tools that SLPs can use to identify developmentally appropriate learning targets, and discusses strategies for writing observable and measurable goals. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
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There’s No Place Like Home: Supporting AAC at Home
Format(s): eWorkshop
Having knowledgeable and supported caregivers—including parents, siblings, care attendants, home aides, home nurses, and extended family—is vital to an AAC user’s success. New opportunities for virtual sessions allow a level of home involvement and support previously made difficult by time and logistical constraints. This session discusses practical strategies for teaching and supporting home caregivers. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
From Babies to Teens: Supporting Transitions for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
In this on demand webinar, an educational audiologist and an SLP discuss using transition resources and collaboration to educate and empower children who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families to build positive educational, social, and post-secondary outcomes. Speakers Carrie Spangler and Lindsay Zombek address central questions such as: How do I expand the child’s support system to build successful transitions? What ages are important for transition success? What tools are available to ensure successful transitions throughout the childhood/adolescence life span?
Preferred Practices for Clinical Swallowing Exams (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar addresses the clinical utility of a clinical swallow examination (CSE) for individuals with suspected swallowing impairment. The speaker discusses the power of the CSE, which comes from employing a systematic assessment to enhance clinical decision-making. The webinar dives into the critical components for a multidimensional CSE applicable across patient populations and settings.
Building a Culturally Inclusive & Gender Affirming Space (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
As visibility for transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) folks increases, audiologists and SLPs may wonder how to ensure their practice is inclusive and affirming. This on demand webinar explores culturally competent and inclusive care for gender diverse individuals. The course includes evidence-based practices, knowledge building about TGNC identities, strategies for maintaining safe spaces, and interactive case studies
Foundations of Effective Supervision: A Four-Course Set
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
These courses provide an overview of key knowledge, skills, and competencies required for effective supervision along with a contemporary context that addresses the intersection of supervision with cultural competence, burnout, and effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Grammar Assessment and Intervention for Multiple Populations
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Studies have shown that grammar is foundational to a child’s communication and academic growth. SLPs who work with children with development language disorders (DLD) – regardless of the etiology of the disorder – need effective research-based grammar interventions in their toolbox. The articles in this journal self-study (selected from a Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools forum, “Morphosyntax Assessment and Intervention for Children”) describe evidence-based approaches for grammar assessment and treatment and provide tools to support goal-setting and progress monitoring. The articles discuss new approaches and practical implications for practice.
Speech Science Views and News
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This activity presents a diverse perspective, including four different speech science articles focused on a variety of topics. Kimball and Sayce discuss the pros and cons of research using behavior and functional assessment and treatment in the areas of speech science and voice, specifically their limitation in outlining etiology or explaining treatment resistance. They also provide an overview of genetic research approaches as a possible path forward to develop additional evidence-based treatment approaches. Neel reviews the production and perception of extralinguistic information regarding sex/gender, sexual orientation, age, non-native accent, regional and social dialect, and race and ethnicity. The article explores the literature in the above areas reviewing acoustical features and common misperceptions, concluding with instructional activities to enhance student awareness of indexical characteristics. McAllister et al. studied the effects of biofeedback for residual rhotic errors in a preliminary case series. Participants were five native English speakers who had not yet generalized rhotic production. Treatment consisted of either electropalatographic or visual-acoustic biofeedback using the Challenge Point Program software. Although participant responses to treatment were variable, the median effect size tended to exceed the minimum value considered clinically significant. Gritsyk et al. examined three measures to determine which best predicted change in production accuracy during a vowel learning task. Using 20 female college students, researchers administered three tasks: an oral stereognosis task, a bite block task using auditory making, and a new phonetic awareness task. The bite block task with auditory masking, measuring proprioceptive awareness, was the only task significantly related to performance in speech learning.
Developmental Outcomes for Children With Early Medical Diagnoses or Experiences (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar explores provision of SLP services for preschool and school-age children with mild to moderate impairment in their development as a result of early medical diagnoses and experiences such as premature birth, congenital anomalies, and chronic medical conditions. The speakers discuss the impact of early diagnoses or disorders on children’s future development; the developmental outcomes for these children; and strategies and tools to support these children and their families.
Innovations and Updates to Best Practices for Dysphagia Assessment and Treatment