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Clinical and Research Topics in  Audiology and Public Health
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 8) articles cover a wide range of audiology and public health research and clinical topics. There are three original research reports and one clinical review. In the first research report, Roman et al. examine the impact of reduced audibility and speaker voice on the mini-mental state examination score in a group of young adults without cognitive impairment. Next, Beamer et al. conduct a preliminary study to investigate the role of a hearing loss prevention education strategies in an active duty military population. Reavis et al. estimate the association between tinnitus and self-reported depression symptoms and between tinnitus and perceived anxiety in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. The final article by Henry and Manning is a review article on sound therapy approaches and clinical options for tinnitus management.
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Considerations for Academic and Clinical  Training in Craniofacial Anomalies
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 5) articles focus on the status of academic and clinical training related to cleft and craniofacial conditions, a module training series for addressing the gaps in current educational roadmaps, and resources and best practice recommendations are provided.
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Perception, Technology, and Clinical Applications
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 19) articles focus on perceptual considerations and the use of a system to investigate lingual coordination as a clinical tool. In the first article Rakerd et al. review the resonant effects of performers, resonance associated with nasality, and resonant voice for both normal and disordered populations. In the second article Grover et al. use the bubble noise method, which places noise randomly in time and frequency with “holes” or “bubbles” that give glimpses into the target signal, to determine what is perceptually important in the speech signal for native/first language listeners versus nonnative/second language listeners. In the final article, Dugan et al. review TonguePART, an image processing system used to track the tongue surface, as a reliable, fast method to track articulatory movement of the tongue for syllables
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Dementia, Student Supervision,  and the Patient Driven Groupings Model
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 15) articles discuss issues related to dementia care, student supervision, and the home health patient driven groupings model. Warren describes the rational for the development of a new payment system, how it will be changing, and what speech-language pathologists can do to be prepared and successfully navigate the transition. Davies explores the relating concepts of participation and communication in dementia care research and to propose future avenues of research within the field of communication disorders. Bice and Smith discuss current issues found in external clinical placements, their possible causes, and offers practical solutions for assisting students to benefit from their experiences.
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Voice and Laryngeal Manifestations of Autoimmune Diseases
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives (SIG 3) article provides a thorough review of the literature regarding autoimmune disease and effects on voice and laryngeal function. To maximize patient outcomes, guidelines for differential diagnosis and referral patterns are highlighted.
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Autism in Early Childhood
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives (SIG 1) forum focuses on the treatment of young children with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. The first article examines the effects of parent-mediated intervention on the spoken language of young children. The second article focuses on an embedded teacher-implemented social communication intervention for preschoolers. The third article examined peer mediated augmentative and alternative communication for young minimally verbal children. The final article reported on social communication predictors of successful inclusion experiences for students with autism in an early childhood lab school.
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Heritage Language Transmission and Community Engagement
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 14) articles focus on learning about variables and challenges that impact heritage language transmission and incorporating student engagement into the local community as part of cultural diversity training in a communication disorders curriculum. Topics include (a) examining variables that contribute to heritage language transmission in Texas, and (b) increasing student awareness of cultural linguistic diversity within the local communities in and around the Los Angeles, CA area.
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Student Stress, Emotional Intelligence, Applying to Graduate School, and Doctoral Training
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In these Perspectives (SIG 10) Roos and Schreck examine the stress experienced by undergraduate students in communication sciences and disorders (CSD), including stress levels, reasons for stress, stress management, and knowledge/use of campus resources to address stress. Shah and Galantino address building the emotional intelligence of undergraduate students studying CSD through exercises completed in class. Sylvan, Perkins, and Tuglio study the experiences and perceptions of CSD students applying to master’s degree programs, including deciding factors for top choices of graduate programs, emotional involvement in the application process, biases/rumors heard, student challenges, advice to future applicants, and what students would change about the application process. Finally, Crais and Savage present an examination of CSD graduates’ perceptions of their PhD program, including challenges they faced, facilitators for success, their preparation for research/teaching/job readiness, and ways PhD education might be improved.
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Graduate Education and Ethics in School-Based Practice
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 16) articles focus on ethical issues and describe considerations for the development of clinical skills in school-based settings. Readers will reflect upon and learn to resolve common ethical dilemmas, review a model of graduate mentoring from the lens of implementation science, and learn about commonly reported factors that both supervisors and graduate students believe critical within successful school-based internship experiences.
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Collaboration in Language, Literacy, and Dysphagia
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 16) articles address strategies for working alongside, as well as teaching others, to improve preschool to middle school students’ performance in language, literacy, social skills, and feeding/swallowing abilities, as well as learn how others perceive speech-language pathologists’ efforts in some of these areas.
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Palliative Care Perspective on Dysphagia Management
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 13) presents clinicians with information across many aspects of feeding and swallowing. Firstly Kendrea Garand, Taylor Thomas, and Rajarshi Dey discuss the physiology of laterality in the clearance of boluses from the pharynx. Next, Jennifer Wilson, Amanda Simmons, and Jillian McCarthy then take us through an interesting description of speech-language pathologists’ experiences and education in pediatric dysphagia and encourage the incorporation of intensive education in this high-risk topic, via various avenues. In the final three articles, Pamela Smith, Jinxu Bridget Xia, and Claire Radford et al., present an in-depth and elaborate perspective on managing patients with dysphagia through a palliative care lens, across the lifespan.
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Developmental Language Disorder/Specific Language Impairment Terminology in Practice
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives (SIG 1) forum focuses on developmental language disorder (DLD), including the history of terminology changes in the field, the relationship of specific language impairment and DLD, diagnostic criteria in the field of speech language pathology, and an examination of DLD through a school-based lens.
Dysphagia and Continuum of Care
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 13) include a variety of topics in dysphagia across the age continuum and across the many settings that speech-language pathologists (SLPs) address dysphagia. Parker Huston, Robert Dempster, and Lauren Garbacz provide readers with an overview of common evidence-based psychological techniques used in the treatment of adolescents with feeding disorders, including motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral techniques. The goal of this paper is to provide a high-level overview of these concepts so that providers outside of psychology may utilize some of these techniques in therapy, when referral to a behavioral specialist or psychologist is not feasible. Next, authors Lauren Madhoun and Robert Dempster discuss the psychosocial aspects of feeding in the neonatal intensive care unit NICU and immediately following NICU discharge. Joanne Patterson extends the discussion to the adult population by describing a biopsychosocial intervention that combines cognitive behavioral with dysphagia therapy, termed Cognitive-Behavioral Enhanced Swallowing Therapy (CB-EST) and its application in managing head and neck cancer patients with dysphagia. Finally, authors Kortney Eng, Maria Jose Flores, Elisabeth Gerrity, Nupur Sinha, Katherine Imbeau, Laddie Erbele, and Cary Yeh share details from their study investigating the effect of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) on swallow physiology in healthy adults. We hope these articles will be of significant value to practicing clinicians and to students learning about dysphagia.
Assessment and Treatment Approaches for Dysphagia Management Across the Lifespan
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 13) articles present clinicians with useful information to help assess and treat feeding and swallowing disorders in a variety of patient populations across the lifespan. Daniel Croake and Vrushali Angadi provide an overview of evidence regarding prophylactic and reactive gastrostomy tubes in individuals with head and neck cancer, to better facilitate joint decision-making of percutaneous gastrostomy (PEG) tube timing with the patient and care team. Hema Desai and Audrey Lim extend the discussion to pediatric dysphagia by summarizing the application of neurobehavioral interventions as part of feeding treatment for infants with congenital heart defects.
Outlining the Use of Strategic Questioning and Applying the Code of Ethics
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 11) articles outline the use of strategic questioning methods to stimulate students' critical thinking and other higher order thinking skills. In addition, the Code of Ethics is discussed as it relates to supervisory experiences across various settings.
History and Collaborative Efforts in  the International Cluttering Association
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 17) articles present a collaborative initiative of the Committee of International Representatives of the International Cluttering Association. Reichel et al., discuss the initiative that began with the Inaugural Joint World Congress in Japan in 2018. Van Zaalen and Reichel present and discuss the auditory-visual feedback training methodology. Gosselin and Ward affirm that cluttering is a fluency disorder that is mainly characterized by an abnormally rapid or irregular rate of speech. Their pilot study expanded the evidence base by using a Stroop Task to investigate attention performance in people with cluttering. Hilda Sønsterud discuss the term working alliance as an important concept in cluttering and stuttering therapy and describe the degree to which the therapy dyad is engaged in collaborative, purposive work.
Global Initiatives: Considerations for Best Practice
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 17) articles discuss different aspects of international practice, including work with immigrant and refugee families. Baigorri, Crowley, and Bukari provide a service delivery model for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and professionals working in low-and middle-income countries. Chakraborty, Schwarz, and Vaughan discuss a major consideration for ASHA to cultivate cultural sensitivity and competence in its largely female (95.30%), monolingual (93.46%) and white (92.10%) workforce. Chu et al., discuss the challenges that SLPs face when providing speech and language therapy in Malaysia and issues that need to be addressed for continued growth of this profession. Maldonado, Ashe, Bubar, and Chapman explore the experiences of monolingual, American, English-speaking SLPs and Clinical Fellows who worked with immigrant and refugee families within a preschool context. Staley et al., consider the literature on international student placements to contextualize and describe a 10-year relationship which enabled speech language pathology students in their final year of study at a Canadian university to complete a 10-week clinical placement with a non-governmental organization in Kenya.
Use of Technology to Assess  Speech Production and Voice
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 19) articles provide with information relevant to speech science research and education. Lulich and Pearson present two demonstrations in this technical report to illustrate the utility of 3D/4D ultrasound technology. First, the authors report that “not only can structures be imaged which previously were impossible to identify from 2D ultrasound alone (e.g., piriform sinuses and posterior pharyngeal wall), but questions involving non-sagittal structures and asymmetrical tongue shapes, such as the pervasiveness and extensiveness of lateral contact between the tongue and the palate-teeth, can now be addressed non-invasively.” Second, they also conclude that “the fusion of ultrasound data with MRI images further enhances the utility of 3D/4D ultrasound, since it combines the strengths of ultrasound with the complementary strengths of the other modality, while mitigating the weaknesses of each.” Richardson et al., compare various acoustical measures of sustained vowels obtained using the Multidimensional Voice Program (MDVP) by Computerized Speech Lab, Praat, and TF32. Results show that the MDVP yield significantly higher values of standard deviation of fundamental frequency, jitter, and shimmer, and significantly lower values of noise-to-harmonics ratio compared to the other programs. They discuss the variation of numerical values across programs and the resulting clinical implications. Hagedorn et al. discuss the benefits of a collaboration among engineers, speech scientists, and clinicians which yield “the development of biologically inspired technology that has been proven useful for both small- and large-scale analysis,” a better understanding of speech production, and the development of assessment tools with a clinical benefit and interdisciplinary reach. They also review the use of real-time magnetic resonance imaging across clinical populations and discuss the challenges associated with collaborative work. Lee and Fischer reveal an association between acoustic vowel space and the severity of dysarthria. They review sex differences, factors that may affect formant-related measures, and clinical implications.
An Intergenerational Cognitive Training Program
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives (SIG 15) article discusses the benefits and nuances of development of an intergenerational cognitive social media training program. The program supports the use of a cognitive social media training tool to promote intergenerational learning, communication, and stimulation, with parallel benefits for young and older adults.
Issues in the School Setting
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 16) addresses important issues for the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in working in the school setting, including assessing bilingual students, grammar interventions for school-aged students, the comfort level of SLPs when working with students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and the impact of professional development on literacy knowledge and practice.
Evaluation and Management of Challenging Patient  Populations in Audiology
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 6) articles focus on diagnostic tools and considerations for management of several challenging patient populations in audiology. The first article discusses utilizing magnetic resonance imaging to determine the functional and structural neural alterations associated with chronic tinnitus. Researchers are utilizing advanced imaging techniques to study variability in perceptual characteristics and reaction to tinnitus. The second article discusses the continuum of disorders known as “cortical hearing impairment,” supported by a comprehensive summary of clinical presentations. Despite its rarity, an audiologist must understand etiologies of cortical hearing impairment and know how to evaluate and characterize the accompanied hearing difficulty. The third article examines the effects of concussion of the vestibular system and presented an assessment battery for athletes postconcussion and for determining return to play.
Clinical and Research Topics in Supervision
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 11) articles outlined how using real-time digital recordings of student sessions can support students' ability to self-evaluate, collect data, and prepare for therapy; provided data regarding the use of low-level vs. high-level questions with first- and final-year graduate students; and described a pilot project involving observation-based formative assessment tools for faculty use during clinical supervision.
Clinical Topics in Audiology and Public Health
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 8) articles cover a wide range of audiology and public health topics. Konrad-Martin and colleagues promote effective and standardized coding and third payer billing practices for the audiological management of symptomatic ototoxicity. The article includes relevant ICD-10-CM codes and CPT codes. Myers and Dundas provide a review of the effects of noise on the vestibular system. They note that temporary and permanent effects of noise on the vestibular system have been reported and advocate for further investigations to unpack the complex relationship between the auditory and vestibular systems. Finally, Pletnikova and colleagues conducted a quality initiative project to determine the feasibility and reliability of a tablet-based portable audiometer to identify hearing loss in a cognitively impaired population.
Improving Patient Safety and Patient-Provider Communication: A Clinical Forum
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 12) articles provide an introduction to and description of the rationale for implementation of augmentative alternative communication/assistive technology (AAC/AT) in acute care settings. Barriers associated with implementation of AAC/AT in acute care settings are identified and discussed. Data regarding use of the Noddle, a specific access and communication option, are presented and discussed. A series of case studies illustrate potential solutions to a wide range of both patient-specific and institutional implementation problems.
Cultural Competence, Adult Bilingual Fluency, and LGBTQ Clients
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 14) articles topics include (a) the effects of an experiential learning opportunity on undergraduates’ cultural competence; (b) a description of an LGBTQ content module that can be integrated into coursework on cultural and linguistic diversity; and (c) fluency strategies for treating bilingual adults who stutter.
Pediatric Auditory Brainstem Implants, Adult Single-Sided Deafness, and Teaching
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 9) articles include topics on evidence, research, and application about pediatric auditory brainstem implants, teaching phonological awareness in young children, and development of The Assessment and Aural Rehabilitation Tool for single-sided deafness in adults.
Issues in Fluency and Fluency Disorders
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 4) covered a diverse area of topics as they related to fluency and fluency disorders, including word-final disfluencies, social support, behavioral and affective comparisons of people who stutter, school participation by children who stutter, and leadership and childhood responses to a public attitudes about stuttering survey.
Topics in Aural Rehabilitation
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 7) articles address therapy, patient education/counseling, and novel eHealth programs to serve clients across the lifespan. The topic of multisensory integration is addressed with a review of cognitive neuroscience literature and recommendations are made for therapy protocols for infants and children with hearing loss. There is a review of the development and outcomes of a multimedia education program for adults with hearing loss. The use of eHealth in patient-centered care for adults with hearing loss is considered for current practice and its future directions. Authors discuss considerations for the use of remote microphone technology by the oldest generation of patients. Finally, patient-centered strategies for communication during audiology consultations are presented to build trust and positive therapeutic relationships.
Neurobiology of Language
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives (SIG 1) forum focuses on neurobiological factors associated with language learning. The first article describes a model of causation by which environmental factors influence neural and cognitive development. The second article examines learning contexts and their impact on verb learning. The third article discusses early motor deficits and their relationship to speech/language outcomes, and the final article reviews morphological processing in normal and clinical populations.
Interprofessional Education and Integrating Coursework and Clinical Experience
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In these Perspectives (SIG 10) articles, Frazier, Whitby, Kucharczyk, Perryman, Thomas, Koch, and Bengtson focus on interprofessional education (IPE) as it relates to transition planning for students with significant disabilities. Musaji, Self, Marble-Flint, and Kanade examine the use of a translational model as a tool for identifying limitations of IPE research. Benigno, McCarthy, Reese, Wright, and Tewanger introduce a pilot study to examine the goals, outcomes, and skills attained by graduate students while participating in clinical experiences integrated with coursework.
Supporting Morphological Skill Development for  School-Aged Children and Adolescents
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives (SIG 1) forum focuses on supporting students in a school setting in improving morphological skills. Authors discuss key components of intervention, collaboration with other professionals, and practical strategies for clinicians.
AAC Considerations for Neurogenic Communication Disorders
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 2) articles review and present current issues related to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) across different patient populations, as well as identifies and discusses team-based interprofessional practice approaches for managing individuals with complex communication needs within both pediatric and adult populations. In the first article, Shannon Taylor, Sarah Jane Wallace, and Sarah Elizabeth Wallace explore factors that influence successful use of high-technology AAC in persons with poststroke aphasia via a literature review and narrative synthesis methodology. Lori Marra and Katie Micco present a clinical focus article that assesses communication partner’s perception regarding the effectiveness of a training model to support AAC use within a parent–adolescent communication pair. Michelle Westley, Dean Sutherland, and H. Timothy Bunnell examine the experience of healthy voice donors during the ModelTalker voice banking process for New Zealand-accent synthesized voices. Sarah Diehl and Michael de Reisthal describe the complex symptoms associated with Huntington’s disease and how they influence implementation of AAC to address the communication needs of this population. Kristen Abbott-Anderson, Hsinhuei Sheen Chiou, and Brooke N. Burk address interprofessional practice via a multidisciplinary patient-centered engagement experience entitled Spring EngAGEment that serves individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease or other associated dementias. Finally, Laura Hinkes Molinaro, and Wendy Stellpflug discuss a team approach for education and support of patients and families with postoperative pediatric cerebellar mutism syndrome.
Interprofessional Education and Practice SIG 2
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 2) articles evaluate, highlight, and analyze various examples of interprofessional education and collaboration amongst speech-language pathologists and other professionals. Interprofessional educational models, collaborative teaming frameworks, and a case study example are also presented.
Clinical Considerations in Telepractice Service Delivery
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 18) articles include topics on workload strategy for speech and language services in schools; vocal quality change during telepractice interactions and its potential impact on the services offered; a review of audiological interventions through telepractice; and the perspectives of clients who stutter who received treatment through telepractice
Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Other Topics in Dysphagia SIG 13
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 13) articles review the functional anatomy underlying different pharyngeal swallow mechanics and swallowing performance goals, discuss the application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in the treatment of dysphagia, and provide critical information to help clinicians build assessment skills and provide evidence-based options for mothers who breastfeed their infants.
Updates on Vocal Fold Paralysis SIG 3
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 3) articles provide a comprehensive update on evaluation and management of unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Multidisciplinary evaluations are addressed in addition to various medical and behavioral treatment options.
High-Resolution Pharyngeal Manometry in Dysphagia SIG 13
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 13) articles discuss the use of high-resolution pharyngeal manometry in the assessment and treatment of dysphagia in pediatrics and adults. Additionally, we present an educational piece discussing considerations in clinical decision-making concerning the initiation of safe oral alimentation in patients on high-flow nasal cannula.
Speech, Surgical, and Psychosocial Considerations for 22Q Deletion Syndrome SIG 5
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 5) articles focus on 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and the associated communication, feeding/swallowing, psychosocial, and surgical factors associated with this condition.
Clinical and Research Implications for School-Based Services SIG 16
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 16) articles address important issues for the speech-language pathologist working in the school setting. Topics include fostering preschoolers’ emergent literacy, supporting children with traumatic brain injury, collaborating with school psychologists, and providing classroom-based services in middle school.
Complex Considerations for Treating Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 1) articles provided an overview of how the core deficits of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) impact reading comprehension, proposed the use of a client-directed model of intervention called social currency, and reviewed characteristics of narrative language that make it a critical context for advanced language development in adolescents with ASD.
Complex Considerations for Speech Sound Disorders in the School Setting
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 1) focus on the complexities of identifying and characterizing speech sound disorder in children and adolescents within the school setting. Articles discuss best practices for selecting tests and using developmental norms and criterionreferenced measures to arrive at more accurate diagnoses. Guidelines for determining eligibility for treatment are addressed, including provisions for social and educational impact, and several clinical scenarios are included.
Clinical and Research Topics in Voice SIG 3
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 3) articles provide learners with diverse information including valuable insight on considerations for the role of the speech-language pathologist in working with trans youth, keys to build a successful telepractice, and a review of the electrolarynx (past and present).
Putting Research Into Practice: Tutorials on Clinical Research, Implementation Science, and Evidence-Based Practice
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In these articles, authors outline how implementation science can aid the advancement of communication sciences and disorders; provide an introduction to patient-reported outcome measures (PRO), the field of health services research, and research-practice partnerships (RPPs); and provide a tutorial for clinicians interested in pursuing quality improvement (QI) practice and research.
Perspectives, SIG 1, Vol. 3, Part 4, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The articles focus on language intervention progress monitoring for elementary students and for adolescents specifically while producing narratives and while learning morphologically complex words. The authors also address the psychometric requirements of oral and written language progress monitoring assessments. Research and theory are tied to practical clinical application with specific examples.
Perspectives, SIG 2, Vol. 3, Part 3, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives addresses a variety of topics related to posterior fossa syndrome in children including an introduction to cerebellar mutism, a review of surgical approaches used for posterior fossa brain tumors, and neuropsychological considerations.
Perspectives, SIG 14, Vol. 3, Part 3, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives issue focused on training clinicians to provide the most appropriate services for people in the LGBTQ community. Topics included; (a) a tutorial on how to design a transgender voice clinic; (b) key characteristics of the LGBTQ community that are pertinent to clinical practice.
Perspectives, SIG 17, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
Blake and McLeod describe the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF’s) purpose, development, contents, and coding. This article discusses the framework used by speech-language-pathologists and audiologists in practice and research to investigate body structures/functions and restrictions these may place on an individual’s ability to participate in activities. McNeilly confirms the need for ICF to become an integral part of clinical preparation providing insight regarding functional clinical outcomes of individuals, maximizing habilitation and rehabilitation outcomes. Ma discusses how the ICF is used to support clinical research, practice and education in Hong Kong with the hope of more global efforts by researchers and clinicians. Papathanasiou describes the principles of the ICF framework, encouraging the early introduction to students, using a framework for course curriculum, clinical competencies, and interprofessional education. Enderby discusses how the ICF is used to develop an outcome measurement approach, Therapy Outcome Measure, with application in a research study.
 Perspectives, SIG 5, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The articles address the coding system for health care billing relevant to speech-language pathology practice. Articles also address the role of the speech-language pathologist during velopharyngeal imaging assessments and implementation of a quality of life scale. Imaging methods, articulation analysis, speech sampling techniques, and clinical evaluation of velopharyngeal insufficiency-specific quality of life are outlined. Case studies are used to guide learning and illustrate how information from the evaluation impacts billing, patient quality of life, and collaboration between professionals for the assessment of velopharyngeal dysfunction.
Perspectives, SIG 13, Vol. 3, Part 4, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This collection of articles reviews and presents current evidence related to novel treatment approaches in dysphagia management across the lifespan. Georgia Malandraki and Kate Hutcheson begin by providing clinicians with an overview of intensive dysphagia therapy programs; more specifically the Intensive Dysphagia Rehabilitation (IDR) approach and the MD Anderson Swallowing Boot Camp protocol for patients with neurogenic dysphagia and dysphagia after treatment for head and neck cancer (HNC) respectively. Next, Maggie-Lee Huckabee and Emma Burnip summarize the conceptual basis for skill training in dysphagia management and review the existing evidence to support its clinical application. Finally, Emily Zimmerman and Kelsey Thompson extend the discussion to the pediatric population and provide a detailed review of new technologies used for dysphagia management in infants, along with their current evidence collection of articles primarily focused on the evidence-based use of screening techniques to identify swallowing disorders in patients with a variety of medical diagnoses.
Perspectives, SIG 2, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Part of Perspectives addressed ethics in neurogenic communication disorders including decisional capacity and the role of the speech-language pathologist in the decisional capacity process, the role of the SLP in supporting medical decision-making for people with neurogenic communication disorders, cognitive-communication factors that place people at risk for impaired decisional capacity, and how aphasia awareness can impact ethical decision making.
Perspectives, SIG 17, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The authors showcase five concepts of international service. Randazzo and Garcia discuss sustainable practices used in an international services model describing an interprofessional services delivery model for service provision in a resource-poor, rural Cambodia. Plumb and Willis examine students’ perceptions of study abroad between Auburn University, the United Kingdom, and Ireland. Campos, Skiados, and Flynn author a discussion of the status of male speech-language pathologists in international speech-language pathology associations, including a review of male recruitment efforts. de Diego-Lazaro authors a description of measuring cultural competencies in speech and language pathology students, introducing the Cultural Awareness and Competence Scales, a new tool to assess cultural awareness. Harten, Franca, Boyer, and Pegoraro-Krook describe the international alliances developed to better equip students and professionals with skills for practicing in a changing world. Waterston, Duttine, Roman, and Caesar provide an update to The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association- Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (ASHA-PAHO/WHO) partnership with a description of the WHO Rehabilitation 2030 initiative in The ASHA-PAHO Partnership: Progress, Future Plans and connecting to WHO Rehabilitation 2030.
Perspectives, SIG 9, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This issue contains two articles. First, authors describe a procedure for completing and applying electrically evoked stapedial reflex threshold (ESRT) measures, objective measures that correlates to upper comfort/stimulation (C/M) levels, to cochlear implant programing. The authors explain evidence, research, set-up, equipment, and procedural practices for ESRTs. Next, authors focus on speech, language, and hearing professionals who provide informational counseling for individuals with hearing loss to facilitate success in a variety of settings. The focus and content of the information changes throughout the life of the individual from initial diagnosis through young adulthood. These shifts, guided by speech-language pathologists in collaboration with professionals from multiple disciplines who work with this population, can help to maximize a successful life trajectory.
Perspectives, SIG 13, Vol. 3, Part 3, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
Authors Carmin Bartow, Nina Collins, Eugene Kopp, and Oscar Guillamondegui discuss the goals, development, and benefits of a multidisciplinary tracheostomy team in the acute care setting, while highlighting the role of the speech-language pathologist as an integral member of this team. Next, authors Arwen Jackson, Shaunda Harendt and Christopher Baker provide a review of existing evidence and propose a model of collaborative decision-making to guide clinicians managing swallowing disorders in children with tracheostomies. Further, authors Allison Holman, Gemma Clunie, Justin Roe, and Tessa Goldsmith describe the nature of laryngotracheal stenosis in adults as well as the diagnosis and management options for dysphagia in this population following surgery. Lastly, authors Steven Leder and Heather Warner investigate if clinicians are using evidence from the literature to guide clinical bedside swallow examinations (CSE) by comparing ratings of the exact same swallows from simultaneously recorded CSE and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing assessments.
Perspectives, SIG 10, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The first article discusses a feasibility study to determine whether brief, recorded teaching modules would increase the use of evidence-based vocabulary instruction by undergraduate clinicians. The second article consists of a study designed to develop a method for assessing speech-language pathology author impact as a function of institution and comparing the results to recent college rankings of speech-language pathology graduate programs. The final article describes the development of an elective course on electroencephalographic research methods designed to encourage Master of Science students to pursue academic and research careers in Communication Sciences and Disorders.
Perspectives, SIG 11, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The first article examines an application of the Ad Hoc Committee on Supervision Training’s newly available training resources into the supervisory responsibilities of clinical educators in the college setting. The second article examines the student learning outcomes from pre- and post-surveys completed by graduate students after participation in a hospital orientation program. The final article explores using a concrete, visual aid (e.g., flowchart) to teach comprehensive and consistent goal-writing techniques to be used across settings.
Perspectives, SIG 5, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The articles address the anatomy and physiology of the velopharyngeal mechanism and the development of velopharyngeal closure. Identification of muscle morphology related to velopharyngeal closure and velopharyngeal dysfunction is described. Additionally, assessment of the orofacial structures is outlined and a clinical checklist is provided.
Perspectives, SIG 12, Vol. 3, Part 4, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In these articles, the authors explore augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) that are bilingual and use English as a second language. Authors also reflect on the cultural and diverse children that use AAC. McNamara considers the established research in bilingualism in the typically developing population and those with speech language disorders to propose guidelines for best practice in bilingual AAC. Yu reviews topics that include studies comparing the developmental outcomes between monolingual and bilingual children on the autism spectrum and studies on the role of home language development in English acquisition. The purpose of Mindel and John’s article is to increase the competency of school-based speech language pathologists who are increasingly working with culturally and linguistically diverse student populations using AAC. Johnston, O’Neill, and Schumann’s article provides interventionists with a strategy for comparing the efficiency of initial graphic symbol acquisition in an individual’s first and second language for English language learners who use AAC during functional communication training. McNamara considers the established research in bilingualism in the typically developing population and those with speech language disorders to propose guidelines for best practice in bilingual AAC. Wagner outlines some commonly heard questions and concerns professional and families share with regards to bilingual AAC intervention and shares some resources for selecting, customizing, and designing robust bilingual AAC system, strategies for teaching core words each month and ways to incorporate both paper-based and electronic-based AAC tools. Solomon-Rice and Soto discuss project scholars who receive evidence-based training in AAC assessment, AAC intervention, collaborative teaming, AAC applications supporting the language and literacy of culturally and linguistically diverse children, and professional development in collaborate AAC settings.
Perspectives, SIG 16, Vol. 3, Part 3, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The articles address important issues for the speech-language pathologist in working in the school setting, including using curriculum-based evaluations, a district-university collaboration allowing for working within the classroom, a team response to intervention approach for phonological disorders, and interprofessional practice in the school setting.
Perspectives, SIG 18, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
Telepractice can be a useful service delivery across the lifespan. The articles explore service provision with both school-aged and adult neurogenic populations. The first article offers an overview of considerations when beginning school-based services, including a review of evidence related to telepractice and other methods of delivery, technological and legal considerations, and resources for effective implementation. The second article describes a telepractice aphasia group, considerations for implementation, and outcomes of the program.
Perspectives, SIG 4, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
Articles focused on three topics: (a) a case study of fluency strategies for hypokinetic dysarthria that was exacerbated by subthalamic nucleus brain stimulation, (b) clinical outcomes for adolescents and adults in an intensive stuttering clinic, and (c) a study of student clinicians who stutter. All of the articles discussed positive outcomes for people who stutter, highlighting the diverse experiences that people who stutter may experience to lead to positive outcomes.
Perspectives, SIG 6, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The first article discusses how electrophysiological measures can supplement traditional audiometric evaluation in assessment of age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Perceptual consequences of ARHL in part, can be attributed to a reduced ability to accurately process temporal and frequency cues of speech. The frequency following response and cortical-auditory evoked potential measures may be used to identify deficits in the neural processing of speech and guide management of ARHL. The second article shares current evidence supporting an association between cognitive impairment and hearing loss. Research is ongoing to determine whether management of hearing loss with amplification devices and auditory rehabilitation reduces the risk for cognitive decline. The third article highlights a novel pharmaceutical intervention for ARHL. Specifically, the paper focused on AUT00063, a small molecule that modifies a critical ion channel, Kv3, involved in repolarization of a neural action potential within the central auditory pathway. The final article focuses on the aspects of cognition that are most relevant to behavioral auditory research and provides an overview of cognitive hearing science, auditory neuroscience, and electrophysiological measures ideal for studying how the brain processes speech.
Perspectives, SIG 7, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The theme for these articles is using technology to enhance aural rehabilitation for adults with hearing loss. Manchaiah introduces the issues related to direct-to-consumer hearing devices. Major topics include important definitions, a summary of the literature, and discussion of risks and benefits associated with the use of direct-to-consumer devices by adults with hearing loss. Olson and colleagues summarize current mobile apps for auditory training designed for adult learners. Mobile apps for smartphones and tablets were reviewed for their content, usability, and potential clinical applications as supplements to aural rehabilitation outside of the clinical setting or in lieu of direct service delivery. Leavitt reviews considerations for individualized recommendations of wireless connectivity to link hearing aids or cochlear implants with other devices such as telephones, remote microphones, induction loops, infrared and personal FM systems. The article includes a process for decision-making and documentation of clinical data to support individualized recommendations. In summary, the articles address three areas of technology in aural rehabilitation for adults that are currently evolving and clinically applicable.
Perspectives, SIG 15, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
Authors identify peer-reviewed academic and medical journal articles that examine typical neuroanatomical aspects and characteristics of the different types of dementia. The authors reinforce the importance of a thorough understanding of these neuroanatomical characteristics for differential diagnosis of dementias. Additionally, authors identify best practices for interprofessional education (IPE) for improving services provided to older adults. Studies have also shown that IPE activities may elicit positive changes in student perceptions toward older adults and other professions.
Perspectives, SIG 1, Vol. 3, Part 3, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This articles focus on contemporary issues regarding African American English (AAE) in children and adolescents across the school-age years. Articles discuss inherent challenges of the “language differences” paradigm and provide new lenses through which to view cultural, social, and pragmatic aspects of AAE. Specialized topics such as theory of mind, speech acts, and cultural-linguistic features of AAE are given special attention in this issue.
Perspectives, SIG 19, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The article provided affiliates with novel information relevant to speech science, specifically room acoustics. In both practicing audiology and speech language pathology, as well as in speech and hearing science research, the space where the work is done is an integral part of the function. Hence, for all of these endeavors it can be important to measure the acoustics of a room. This article provided a tutorial regarding the measurement of room reverberation and background noise, both of which are important when evaluating a space’s strengths and limitations for speech communication. As the privacy of patients and research participants is a primary concern, the tutorial also describes a method for measuring the amount of acoustical insulation provided by a room’s barriers (walls, windows, and doors). Several room measurement data sets—all obtained from the assessment of clinical and research spaces within the authors’ department—are presented as examples in the article.
Perspectives, SIG 3, Vol. 3, Part 3, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The articles provide readers with various perspectives ranging from outcomes in pediatric voice therapy, postural impacts on voice production, muscle tension dysphonia and multidisciplinary care, and how to apply basic exercise physiology principles to special populations.
Perspectives, SIG 12, Vol. 3, Part 3, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
Hurting, Alper, and Berkowitz discussed the financial and ethical implications of preventable adverse events. The authors stress the need to use a multipronged approach, which increases awareness of and support for speech-language pathology services. Ogletree, McMurry, Schmidt, and Evans considered the three realities facing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) providers. These included: (a) users who are not homogeneous with respect to culture and language, (b) a traditional team-based AAC assessment process that may not be the preferred route, and (c) assumptions about AAC symbol transparency that are not supported by data. Caron, Holyfield, Light, and McNaughton explored displaced talk using video visual speech displays (VSDs). The findings revealed that there is potential in utilizing video VSD to support participation for displaced talk in individuals with autism spectrum disorder. When using VSD’s, the individual in the study takes more communication turns and is more engaged in his social interactions.
Perspectives, SIG 16, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The articles addressed the role of the school-based speech-language pathologist in working with children with dysphagia, working with speech sound disorders, and understanding phonological awareness in children with apraxia of speech.
Perspectives, SIG 14, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These articles include two qualitative studies that provided insight into various aspects of services for culturally diverse and linguistic (CLD) populations. Topics include: (a) a qualitative study conducted by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Multicultural Issues Board designed to extract CLD clinicians’ beliefs on how their backgrounds affect their career choices and practice, as well as their suggestions on how to be most responsive to CLD clients; (b) a qualitative analysis of caregivers’ views on services they received for their CLD children during home-based treatment and; (c) a cross-disciplinary review of 40 years of literature on children who use African American English.
Perspectives, SIG 16, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This issue addresses syntax in school-age children, focusing on the effect of sentence combining treatment provided to weak writers. It further addresses inter-professional practice in schools, including values/ethics, roles and responsibilities, communication, and teamwork in early childhood settings, a clinic setting, and schools.
Perspectives, SIG 10, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The articles focus on how higher education might increase the number of PhD graduates from communication sciences and disorders (CSD) programs, highlighting responses from interviews with PhD Program Coordinators. Authors describe a survey designed to determine if undergraduate students are participating in known opportunities for research and if such undergraduate research experience is related to interest in pursuing a master’s thesis or PhD. Finally, authors describe an interdisciplinary teaching and outreach initiative in which diverse non-communication sciences and disorders undergraduate students were immersed in the field of CSD due to their collective interest in music.
Perspectives, SIG 3, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The articles provide affiliates with information about pediatric instrumental examination and variations in vocal fold vibratory parameters and voice therapy approaches in the pediatric population. From there, authors explore the knowledge of the speech-language pathologist regarding how hormones effect voice function and concepts related to motor learning and voice rehabilitation.
Perspectives, SIG 2, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives was the first open call issue for SIG 2 with a specific focus on functional assessment and intervention for a variety of neurogenic communication disorders. Topics covered included the role of language and cognitive abilities in the life participation approach for people with aphasia, functional assessment and treatment in acquired and traumatic brain injury, cognitive-communication treatment groups for student training and post-concussion syndrome, and the use of voice therapy for a teen with athetoid cerebral palsy.
Perspectives, SIG 12, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In these articles, authors explored various alternative access methods for augmentative and alternative communication with a variety of populations. One author introduces brain-computer interfaces (BCIs, reviews both the misconceptions about them and the important factors to consider when evaluating a BCI for use by someone with CCN. In another article, the author describes advances in access technology already being employed as access solutions to SGD’s and highlights areas for advancement and refinements of access technologies. Another author reviews research evidence related to eye tracking and gaze technologies with various populations. The final article focuses on teaching switch access for individuals who have significant communication, physical and sensory disabilities and who are unable to use direct selection. In this article, the use of switch access with scanning is explored in terms of how to teach motor/cognitive aspects with aided language receptive input and expressive use.
Perspectives, SIG 13, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This collection of articles primarily focused on the evidence-based use of screening techniques to identify swallowing disorders in patients with a variety of medical diagnoses. Kara Maharay and Kelly Salmon reviewed specific dysphagia screening tools for the neurologic population and provided readers with tips for implementing a screening protocol for patients with acute stroke, with a focus on multidisciplinary collaboration. Next, Joy Gaziano and Stephanie Watts provided an overview of the utility of screening for esophageal impairments during videofluoroscopic swallow studies. Mario Alberto Landera, Donna S. Lundy, and Amanda Demane extended the discussion by describing key considerations for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) managing dysphagia in patients with head and neck cancers and the importance of SLP participation in the multidisciplinary head and neck tumor board. Finally, Debra Suiter provided clinicians with an overview of some of the challenges and controversies associated with current dysphagia screening tools.
Perspectives, SIG 6, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives, shared two insightful articles that could influence clinical care decisions. The first article discussed the ambiguity in the diagnosis of an auditory processing disorder and what to consider when selecting a diagnostic test. This article defined the “gold standard” test and elaborated on diagnostic accuracy research. The second article detailed the prevalence and indicators of dementia. Research suggests that hearing loss is a potential modifiable factor for dementia. This article reviewed considerations for hearing assessment, counseling, and communicating with patients with dementia. Audiologists play an important role in differentiating communicative behaviors associated with hearing loss from those of dementia and can assist in optimizing hearing and safety of persons with dementia.
Perspectives, SIG 1, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives focused on current issues in the treatment of individuals with autism. The authors offered practical strategies for clinicians and families, answers to frequently asked questions, and information about specialized topics such as bilingualism and African American English.
Perspectives, SIG 13, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The five articles presented in Part 1 elaborated on several vital issues within the topic of dysphagia. Authors Jessica Zarzour, Loretta Johnson, and Cheri Canon discussed strategies to employ to minimize clinician and patient exposure to radiation during a fluoroscopic evaluation of the swallow. In the second article, authors Tsega Temtem and Mark Corkins educated the audience on the development and function of the gastrointestinal tract and the mechanism of digestion of foods into nutrients and waste. Next, author Adele Evans presented an extraordinary perspective of the laryngeal system focusing on the differences between the infant and adult laryngeal anatomy and its subsequent impact on laryngeal function. The application of the popular Ice Chip Protocol and the concept of safe aspiration are discussed by authors Susan Langmore and Jessica Pisegna. Lastly, authors Jamie Mahurin-Smith and Catherine Genna comprehensively highlighted the importance of providing competent assistance to breastfeeding mothers.
Perspectives, SIG 18, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
Telepractice can be a helpful tool in connecting remote and diverse communities to the specialized services they need. As telepractice expands access, it also increases the need for clinicians to be prepared to provide appropriate services to clients with a wider variety of cultural and linguistic influences. Additionally, service-providers must consider the interaction of the telepractice environment and a client’s cultural perceptions and needs. This Perspectives explored the theme of culturally and linguistically-responsive services through telepractice. The featured authors described a teleaudiology program in remote, Native Alaskan communities and shared an overview of policy, research, and resources to inform cultural considerations in speech-language telepractice services.
Perspectives, SIG 14, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives targeted a personnel preparation approach to promote cultural competence when working with Arab-Americans, as well as a research review with a clinical case study pertaining to selecting the language of intervention for a bilingual child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Topics included: (a) research to support clinical decisions about language of intervention with bilingual children diagnosed with ASD; (b) strategies to educate an interprofessional team about best practices in bilingual intervention for children with ASD and; (c) application of critical thinking skills in order to be culturally competent when working with Arab-Americans.
Perspectives, SIG 3, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Part of Perspectives provides readers with a new framework to consider voice training to offset vocal fatigue, how to use pathophysiology to choose therapy techniques, and an explanation of the characteristics of presbyphonia, along with the use of behavioral intervention to treat and prevent age-related voice changes.
Perspectives, SIG 1, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives focused on language sample analysis (LSA) in children and adolescents across the school-age years. Articles discussed methods for collecting, analyzing, and using language samples to aid practitioners in differential diagnosis, selecting intervention goals, and monitoring progress. Specialized topics such as African American English, social pragmatic disorder, and LSA for written language samples are given special attention and several case studies are included.
Perspectives, SIG 11, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives investigated speech pathology student clinicians’ preferences regarding the provision of feedback and documentation requirements. The findings from a Howard University study on the effectiveness of short-term international clinical practicum experiences were also examined. The potential of telesupervision to increase both the opportunity and access to clinical education was also discussed. In addition, the results from a study using smart watches to deliver bug-in-the-ear real-time feedback to student clinicians were also reported.
Perspectives, SIG 12, Vol. 2, Part 4, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In these articles, authors explore multimodal communication methods. First, authors consider musical and adapted sport experience to create multiple opportunities for communication, as well as the demands these create. Then, authors explore a variety of potential communicative acts, and how multimodal tools can be used to inform Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC).
Perspectives, SIG 17, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives addressed a variety of service delivery and training models in Zambia, Cambodia, India, and Rwanda respectively. The overarching concept of international interprofessional education and practice is demonstrated through the various approaches to education, clinical training, and service delivery
Perspectives, SIG 12, Vol. 2, Part 3, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In this part, authors explore the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) with deafblindness and other sensory disabilities. Authors discuss using dance to teach concepts and communication to children with multiple disabilities, meeting the communication needs of students who are culturally and linguistically diverse and have deafblindness, developing intervention approaches for individuals with visual impairments, and supporting literacy in students with deafblindness.
Perspectives, SIG 8, Vol. 2, Part 1, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
Three interesting but diverse articles are featured in this edition of Perspectives. One article presented a positive viewpoint of new areas where cochlear implants are making an impact. These areas include single-sided deafness and high frequency hearing loss, among others. Another article presented an overview of audism and how it may be present in the words and actions of audiologists. The article also presented suggestions for education and approach that can help improve the relations between audiologists and the Deaf community. Finally, an article that contained information about hearing loss in urban youth and how disparities that exist might be ameliorated.
Perspectives, SIG 15, Vol. 2, Part 3, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The author discusses the behavioral and surgical treatments offered to people with age-related voice loss (presbyphonia) and the opportunity for improved voice quality of life. Age-related changes to the body, specific to the vocal mechanism, and a summary of several treatments available to improve the voice considering the changing needs of the baby boom generation as they get older are explored.
Perspectives, SIG 2, Vol. 2, Part 4, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
o This Perspectives addressed issues in neuroaudiology and its connection with neurogenic communication disorders. Topics covered included auditory processing disorders after brain injury, an overview of intervention for auditory processing disorder, the pathophysiology of tinnitus and tinnitus management, and characteristics of otoacoustic emissions.
Perspectives, SIG 7, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Part addresses considerations for enhancing the service and delivery of hearing health care. Boothroyd inspires a more holistic approach to audiology in response to changes in consumer independence, access to new technologies, and emerging scientific knowledge. Luey and Wise address the role of public health policy to meet needs of hearing health care worldwide and provide insights into potential barriers to hearing services for individuals experiencing deprived socioeconomic circumstances. Ross, interviewed by Cienkowski, offers insights into the development of audiology and notable historical events, as well as challenges to the future of the profession. Heacock and Preminger focus on the inclusion of adult children in the aural rehabilitation process of family-centered health care and offer suggestions for their involvement.
Perspectives, SIG 1, Vol. 2, Part 4, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives addressed special issues for speech-language pathologists serving English language learners with language and literacy needs, and included information and strategies for promoting language and literacy skills in preschoolers, early elementary, and special populations such as those with autism spectrum disorders.
Perspectives, SIG 5, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Part includes a paper addressing the study of the velopharynx using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The advantages and disadvantages of MRI as a clinical tool are discussed, as well as an overview of the underlying principles and standard assessment protocol using MRI.
Perspectives, SIG 6, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives focused on the current cochlear implant candidacy for adults with hearing impairment. We reviewed factors such as bilateral implantation, bimodal stimulation, surgical improvements, MRI compatibility, insurance coverage, and cosmetic considerations. We discussed the benefit of preserving low-frequency hearing loss with the hybrid/electro-acoustic cochlear implant. Moreover, we examined potential contributors for loss of residual acoustic hearing with hybrid/electro-acoustic cochlear implantation in a subset of patients. Etiologies such as mechanical damage to cochlear structures, inflammation and apoptosis of hair cells, and alterations to blood flow were discussed. Audiologists should stay informed on implantable solutions to hearing loss and should recommend cochlear implant evaluation for patients that fit the expanded candidacy criteria.
Perspectives, SIG 16, Vol. 2, Part 3, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Part focuses on inter-professional practice in schools. It addresses evidence-based strategies to use when working with students with autism.
Perspectives, SIG 9, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This part of Perspectives covers a diverse range of topics including a review of auditory verbal therapy, reducing bullying for children who are D/HH, the current state of audiology services for central auditory processing, and, finally, guiding parents in managing their child's behavior in order to increase hearing aid use. The articles provide current practical information for clinicians who serve children who are deaf and hard of hearing, including audiologists, early interventionists, speech-language pathologists, and teachers.
Perspectives, SIG 14, Vol. 2, Part 3, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives targeted personnel preparation methods to promote cultural competence, as well as health disparities in the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) community. Topics included: (a) identification of areas of disparities and barriers to services for children with ASD from diverse backgrounds and how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can help reduce some disparities; (b) a description of Project Tapestry that prepares future SLPs to differentiate linguistic differences from disorders, be sensitive to and aware of cultural differences, and communicate and implement culturally appropriate treatment plans, and; (c) a description of an interprofessional education program that included clinically oriented coursework and internships to teach SLPs to integrate evidenced-based training with practice.
Perspectives, SIG 12, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In these articles, authors address how one can use language development theories when designing supportive Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) system interfaces and examine how AAC visual scene displays can be used to support participation and communication in vocational and community tasks.
Perspectives, SIG 13, Vol. 2, Part 4, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
Angela Malek, Kendrea Garand, and John Luque provided a concise overview of the different types of clinical research study designs using examples from the swallowing literature. Joanne Patterson and Camilla Dawson extended the discussion by providing us with tips and tools to critically appraise qualitative literature. Further, Dr. Katherine Hutcheson provided an overview of the basic steps to translate a clinical question into a research question and discussed practical considerations for planning a research study. Dr. Bonnie Martin Harris, Dr. Kendrea Garand, and Dr. Kate Humphries presented a thorough review of the innovation, dissemination and implementation of the Modified Barium Swallow Impairment Profile (MBSImP©TM) for clinicians. Finally, Clare Burns and Laurelie Wall discussed key considerations for speech-language pathologists to use telepractice services in the management of patients with head and neck cancer.
Perspectives, SIG 2, Vol. 2, Part 3, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives addressed the clinical management of adult neurogenic communication disorders in a diverse aging world. Topics covered included decolonizing speech-language pathology practice in adult neurogenic communication disorders, speech-langue pathology services for Chinese-speaking people with aphasia, mild cognitive impairment in Hispanic and African America adults, neurocognitive control deficits for bilingual adults with aphasia, neuroimaging in the treatment of bilingual neurogenic communication disorders, and interprofessional practice in the neurorehabilitation of Hispanic/Latino populations.
Perspectives, SIG 16, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Part focuses on assessment, goal writing, and activities for meeting the speech-language needs of English only and English Learner school-age students, taking into consideration Common Core Standards and academics.
Perspectives, SIG 10, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Part of Perspectives focuses on how higher education might include and enhance clinical training in the area of transgender voice and communication, including an introduction to voice and communication training for transgender clients, suggested guidelines and approaches, and meta-therapy and counseling techniques. This includes a look at first-person narratives by transgender individuals regarding voice and communication, a review of World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) suggested guidelines, and combining voice, speech science, and art approaches to resonant challenges. Additional information in this area specific to higher education includes inclusion of transgender voice and communication training in a university clinic, connecting practicum experiences with knowledge from the classroom to enhance clinical training, and a motor learning perspective for use in a university-based practicum.
Perspectives, SIG 18, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
Telepractice has the potential to benefit clients with a variety of needs, including those who need speech, hearing and swallowing services. This Perspectives on Telepractice explored three different facets of telepractice. The featured authors reviewed current research on the role of telepractice in dysphagia management, discussed the perspectives of Au.D. students who received training in telepractice, and examined the components of a successful telepractice training program for graduate, speech-language pathology students.

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