CE Courses / 0.45 - 0.6 ASHA CEUs

List View
Grid View
60 Products

New!
Telepractice and Kids: Lessons From Remote Service Delivery During the Pandemic
Format(s): Journal (Online)
The articles in this journal self-study explore the effects of remote audiology and speech-language service delivery for children during the COVID-19 pandemic. The articles identify and describe experiences with remote service delivery, discuss the impacts on children, and focus on what has been learned. The articles highlight future research and practical takeaways audiologists and speech-language pathologists can use to provide and expand quality services via telepractice moving forward.
Autism and Telepractice
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This SIG 1 Perspectives activity focuses on how to work with students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their caregivers via telepractice. The first article provides five practical tips for supporting families of children with ASD while implementing effective interventions via various telepractice modalities. The second article reviews the feasibility of implementing telehealth programs related to behavioral interventions for families and their children with ASD. The third article explores the usability of a web-based application of the JASPER social communication intervention. The fourth article discusses the results of a survey completed by speech-language pathologists who utilized telepractice to teach children with autism to access and use augmentative and alternative communication devices. The final article shares current available research related to the barriers of and solutions to conducting telehealth assessment and interventions for families and their students with ASD.
New!
Counseling in Acquired Brain Injury
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These SIG 2 Perspectives articles focus on counseling skills for working with persons with aphasia, “counseling+” activities for patients with mild cognitive impairment and dementia, and resilience in neurorehabilitation. Topics include counseling skills; counseling roles of SLPs; care partner training; and resilience in persons with acquired brain injury, aphasia, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease.
Executive Functions and Language: Self-Talk, Syntax, Semantics, and Strategies for Planning and Self-Regulation
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This SIG 1 Perspectives activity focuses on the relationship between language and executive function (EF) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and/or developmental language disorder (DLD). A clinical model of language therapy for adolescents with DLD and concomitant EF deficits was proposed. Finally, a theoretical framework for understanding and promoting metacognition and EF as part of assessment and treatment plans for speech-language pathologists was discussed.
Management of Cognitive Symptoms of Mild TBI
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Concussion - or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) - is a unique injury that is different from more severe brain injury, and addressing the associated cognitive deficits requires personalized, targeted interventions These articles discuss research and practical implications for the management of cognitive symptoms of mTBI, including defining the role of the SLP on interdisciplinary management teams, exploring specific assessment and treatment strategies, and emphasizing functional, personalized goals. The articles are from a 2021 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology forum "Interdisciplinary Management of Concussion or Mild TBI." The articles provide evidence and strategies to increase clinician confidence and effectiveness when working with individuals with concussion or mTBI.
Techniques for Designing Courses, Examining Preferences, and Conducting Experiential Learning
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
Pedagogical practices in communication sciences and disorders have grown thanks in part to innovative techniques from other fields. The articles in this activity each present models that can be successfully incorporated into our discipline. Slavych describes models of backward course design—course development that starts by focusing on learning outcomes before considering content or teaching methods. Squires and Squires introduce best–worst scaling, a method for examining group preferences, and reported on how it can inform admissions practices. Speights Atkins et al. describe models of mentoring undergraduate research experiences and their applications in two communication sciences and disorders research labs. Finally, Perryman et al. examine the effects of a mixed-reality simulation in which actors playing parents interacted through computer avatars with undergraduate students carrying out clinical procedures.
Examining Challenges for Faculty and Students in Communication Sciences and Disorders Programs
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
The theme for this SIG 14 activity is examining challenges for faculty and students in communication sciences and disorders (CSD). Topics include (a) challenges faced by academic mothers in CSD programs; (b) challenges faced by faculty of color in CSD departments; and (c) examining microaggression endorsement in CSD students.
Interventions to Improve Conversation and Discourse Production for People With Aphasia
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study includes select papers on conversation and discourse production that were presented at the 49th Clinical Aphasiology Conference (2019) in Whitefish, Montana. The articles reflect the current state of research on treatments to improve conversation and discourse production for people with aphasia.
Targeting Literacy-Related Skills of Children With Autism
Format(s): Journal (Online)
The articles in this journal self-study discuss the literacy difficulties many children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience, with direct clinical implications for literacy assessment and intervention. The articles, which apply to children across the age spectrum, are from a 2021 forum published in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, titled “Literacy in Autism—Across the Spectrum.”
Promoting Mental Health for School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists & Students
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
Upon entering into a new school year, this SIG 16 Perspectives activity highlights some of the realities faced by school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and their students. Across all articles, readers will learn of the challenges that are all too often experienced by SLPs and our students, as well as recommendations for how to increase satisfaction with school-based positions, reduce burnout, and increase the mental health, representation, and motivation of our students. In the first article, the authors (Amir, Jones, Frankel, & Fritzch) report survey results that found that although school-based SLPs are satisfied with their relationships with students, they continue to experience challenges, especially related to caseload/workload and others’ misunderstanding of the roles and responsibilities of the SLP. This article is followed by a tutorial from Marante and Farquharson, in which they provide tips to address some of these challenges and reduce feelings of burnout and overwhelm, providing helpful checklists in the appendices. In the remaining three articles, authors outline ways for school-based SLPs to further support our students. The first of these articles, by Hoff and Unger, describes how to collaborate with mental health providers to address some of the unique social-emotional needs of students who stutter. Harris and Owen Van Horne, in the subsequent article, address how to include more diverse materials within therapy sessions so that the lived experiences of all students are more accurately portrayed and represented. Lastly, Abendroth and Whited discuss ways to support older students who are transitioning into adulthood, giving readers several ideas for how to increase students’ motivation, further develop rapport, and provide models of problem solving and resiliency.
Expanding Educational Opportunities in CSD Programs
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
In this activity, four recent SIG 10 articles are presented. First, Domsch, Stiritz, and Huff utilized a mixed-methods design to examine the cultural awareness of students in communication sciences and disorders (CSD) during and after a study-abroad experience. Next, Franca, Boyer, and Pegoraro-Krook explored activities designed to promote cultural and clinical competence in a collaboration between CSD programs in the United States and Brazil. Then, Veyvoda and Van Cleave reviewed the literature on service-learning and community-engaged learning, described how these approaches could be used in distance-learning modalities, and explored how doing so could be accomplished during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, Towson et al. studied the effectiveness of coaching paired with the use of a mixed-reality simulator as CSD students practiced interprofessional communication skills in role-play scenarios.
Emotion/Attention Issues & Stuttering: Podcasts, Stereotypes, Covert Stuttering
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This activity is a grouping of studies related to the understanding stuttering throughout the life span. The activity is based on articles related to attentional focus on motor control in people who stutter (PWS) and the relationship to social stress, acoustic measures of emotion in children who stutter, a study of covert stuttering throughout the lifespan, vocational stereotyping of PWS by human resource preprofessionals, and audio-based podcasts to assist in self-help for PWS. Together, these articles investigate important measures in understanding stuttering and how researchers and clinicians can better understand the condition of stuttering.
Emerging Tools and Methodologies in Teleaudiology
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Even before the COVID-19 pandemic required clinicians to rapidly adapt their practice for remote service provision, researchers were already exploring effective telehealth approaches for audiology. The articles in this journal self-study (selected from a special issue of the American Journal of Audiology, “4th International Meeting on Internet and Audiology”) examine teleaudiology tools and methodologies for hearing screenings, home-based auditory assessment for people who use cochlear implants, assessing hearing aid outcomes using ecological momentary assessment (EMA), and a tool for evaluating hearing aid performance.
A Myriad of Dysphagia Interventions: NICU, Cultural Humility, Instrumentation, Nursing, Tracheostomy Tubes, and Technology
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This collection of articles presents clinicians with evidence on a variety of topics in dysphagia that can be utilized in practice immediately. Alaina Martens and Emily Zimmerman offer insight regarding changes to feeding patterns in infants diagnosed with bronchopulmonary dysplasia after prolonged oxygen therapy in the newborn intensive care unit. Paula Leslie and colleagues provide a framework of health and illness and how food and drink are much more. They stress the importance of clinician appreciation as a cultural guest in our patients’ lives. Bonnie Martin-Harris and colleagues stress the importance of instrumentation with a thorough review of available practice guidelines and appropriateness criteria issued to date, revealing a deficit of up-to-date, comprehensive, evidence-based information on the diagnosis and evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Specifically, a lack of quality guidance on the ordering, performance, and reporting of the modified barium swallow study has hindered efforts to improve standardization and ensure quality continuity of care. Naomi Gurevich and colleagues stress the need to clarify guidelines and increase interprofessional education between both professions to improve patient care. George Barnes and Nancy Toms highlight speech-language pathologists’ need for a solid foundation of knowledge when it comes to patients with highly complex disease processes and care plans. Deirdre Muldoon and colleagues conduct a review of published literature regarding management of feeding difficulties at the oral phase of feeding in children with autism spectrum disorder and/or developmental disability. Finally, Paul M. Evitts and colleagues reveal a potential way to track aspiration in healthy adults using an app.
Communication Choice and Agency: Thinking Beyond  Spoken Language for Individuals on the Autism  Spectrum
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This Perspectives activity focuses on communication choice and agency for individuals on the autism spectrum. These individuals are the key informants in decisions around the conceptualization, implementation, and evaluation of educational programming for autistic learners. Speaking autistic adults encourage families, professionals, and society to promote and accept all communication as equal.
Childhood Maltreatment Consequences on Social Pragmatic and Literacy Skills
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This activity focuses on the childhood maltreatment consequences on social pragmatic communication. Based on a complex family and social conception of neglect, a logical model illustrating public health services for children experiencing neglect is proposed. The role of speech-language pathology in prevention, policy, and practice is outlined. The importance of assessing the narrative language of children exposed to complex trauma is also emphasized.
The Impact of Hearing Loss on Language and Literacy
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This Perspectives forum focuses on the reading outcomes of students with hearing loss and cochlear implants. The first article examines the role of vocabulary on print knowledge for students with hearing loss. The second article provides recommendations for treating the listening and spoken language skills of students with hearing loss based on the results of a 2-year study. The third article compares how reading ability and working memory are impacted in students with cochlear implants and hearing aids after they participated in a computer-based program. The final article explores the relationship between language and reading ability in students with hearing impairment.
Vestibular and Balance Rehabilitation
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
For people experiencing dizziness, what are possible options for vestibular and balance rehabilitation? This self-study from Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups (SIG 7) addresses treatment choices in vestibular and balance rehabilitation, the state of the evidence on their efficacy, and future directions for interdisciplinary research and practice. Written by clinicians and scholars with expertise in audiology and physical therapy, the four articles present an interdisciplinary and life span approach to vestibular and balance rehabilitation for children and adults. The first article by Christy is on the use of vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy for dizziness in children. Next, the review by Herdman focuses on the evolution of vestibular function tests and rehabilitation for major vestibular disorders as well as areas in which research and clinical practice may grow in the future. In Holmberg, the relatively new but common diagnosis of persistent postural-perceptual dizziness (PPPD) is presented in terms of its pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment protocols. Finally, Clendaniel provides a review on the use of vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Included are detailed photos and illustrations of current techniques and exercises. As described in the introduction to the forum by Guest Editor Neil Shepard, PhD, “It is hoped that these four articles will provide a needed look at vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy (VBRT) so the audiologist can serve as a productive member of the treatment team and have a good understanding as to everything that
Current Issues in Augmentative & Alternative Communication Service Provision
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 12) articles provide information on an assortment of current issues in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) service provision. Specific topics include discussions regarding preparation and training of speech-language pathologists and other stakeholders in the AAC field as well as information regarding culturally competent assessment and intervention. In addition, literacy acquisition using video visual scene displays is introduced and information regarding image color in AAC displays is provided.
Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Apraxia of Speech
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
First, Julie Case and Maria Grigos provide a review of speech motor control literature in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and give clinical implications to the assessment and treatment of CAS. Second, Kristen Allison reviews approaches to measuring speech intelligibility in children with motor speech disorders. Third, Tricia McCabe, Donna Thomas, and Elizabeth Murray describe Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment (ReST) as a treatment for CAS. Fourth, Nancy Tarshis, Michelle Winner, and Pamela Crooke explore how communication challenges in CAS impact social competency and how speech motor challenges impact social development. Finally, Nina Benway and Jonathan Preston evaluate if features of CAS in the literature could be replicated in a sample of school-age children. Readers will describe how speech motor skills have been found to change with practice in CAS, list the linguistic factors that can influence intelligibility, describe the quality of the research that supports ReST, explain ways to consider social cognition in therapy for CAS, and rank the speech features that distinguish the narrow phonetic transcriptions of children with CAS and speech sound disorders.
Factors of Graduate and Undergraduate Student Success
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 10) articles explore several issues related to student success. Sylvan, Brock, Perkins, and Garret examine prerequisites required by graduate programs in speech-language pathology across the United States. Roitsch, Murphy, and Raymer investigate the relationship between executive functions and academic outcomes in speech-language pathology graduate students. Richardson, Roberts, and Victor explore ways to predict the clinical success of graduate students studying speechlanguage pathology. Look, Shoemaker, Hoepner, and Blake discover benefits of engaging undergraduate students in research.
Speech Perception and Production
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This Perspectives (SIG 19) includes four different speech science articles that focus on speech production, speech perception, or both. Akbari and Aoyama examine epenthetic vowels produced by Persian L2 speakers of English corroborating previous research findings regarding acoustical characteristics of anaptyctic epenthetic vowels—prothetic epenthetic vowels differ from the phonemic vowels they precede. Hitchcock et al. examine speech perception of typical adults, typical children, and children with speech sound disorders, finding that children with speech sound disorders differ as compared to both typical groups. Rong conducted a preliminary examination of the articulatory control of speech and speech-like tasks. The results revealed shared and task-specific articulatory features in speech and speech-like tasks, specifically sharing that alternating motion rate tasks may be more useful for assessing temporal aspects of articulation whereas sequential motion rate tasks may be more useful for assessing spatial aspects of articulation and coordination. Lastly, Boyd-Pratt and Donai review evidence that the high frequency region contains perceptual cues regarding segmental, speaker identity, and speaker sex as well as improved speech recognition in the presence of noise.
Clinical and Research Topics in  Audiology and Public Health
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 8) articles cover a wide range of audiology and public health research and clinical topics. There are three original research reports and one clinical review. In the first research report, Roman et al. examine the impact of reduced audibility and speaker voice on the mini-mental state examination score in a group of young adults without cognitive impairment. Next, Beamer et al. conduct a preliminary study to investigate the role of a hearing loss prevention education strategies in an active duty military population. Reavis et al. estimate the association between tinnitus and self-reported depression symptoms and between tinnitus and perceived anxiety in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. The final article by Henry and Manning is a review article on sound therapy approaches and clinical options for tinnitus management.
Vocabulary Learning Strategies for Adolescents
Format(s): Journal (Online)
A 2019 Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools forum, Vocabulary Across the School Grades, presented evidence that strong vocabulary is important for students’ literacy and overall academic success across grade levels. The articles in this journal self-study course describe effective instructional strategies for facilitating vocabulary growth and improving reading comprehension in middle and high school students. The authors present recommendations and implications for practice.
Refining Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Apraxia of Speech
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study updates clinicians on advances in the field that can refine current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Two articles address assessment: One examines how type of stimuli can affect differential diagnosis of CAS, and the other identifies possible red flags in young children by examining characteristics of speech production in infants and toddlers who were later diagnosed with CAS. Two additional articles address advances in intervention for CAS: One looks at the efficacy of adding prosody as a treatment component, and the other explores a model-based treatment protocol.
Effects of Cochlear Implants on Language Development in School-Age Children
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study course compares language performance in children with and without cochlear implants from preschool to 6th grade. The articles examine levels of language from phonology to prosody, offering insights into areas of strength and weakness as well as clinical directions. The first article examines consonant acquisition patterns based on hearing exposure. The second and third articles compare morphosyntactic, lexical, and phonological awareness profiles, the effect of literacy on each language skill, and types of errors produced in school-age children with and without cochlear implants. The fourth article explores differences in word-learning strategies that could affect lexical development and offers clinical suggestions based on these findings. The final article explores children’s abilities to discriminate emotional intent based on suprasegmental characteristics in the speech signal.
Innovations in AAC Assessment, System Design, and Communication Partner Training
Format(s): Journal (Online)
SLPs who work with children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) need a broad base of knowledge in evidence-based assessment, system designs, and implementation practices, particularly as technological innovations in AAC proliferate. This journal self-study explores of all of the above. The first article provides a useful framework for assessment that distinguishes essential components according to the child’s motor and cognitive abilities. Two articles examine design features: The first examines consistency of symbol location to increase efficiency, and the second looks at characteristics of naturalistic displays and their effects on gaze behavior according to clinical profiles. The final article in this self-study reviews practices for training communication partners of children who use AAC.
Best Seller
Innovations in Audiology
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This self-study includes work presented at the Third International Meeting on Internet and Audiology. The articles discuss innovations in audiology, with a focus on teleaudiology and eHealth services. Readers will learn about Internet programs and smartphone applications that assist with the management of hearing and hearing-related issues, as well as how data collected through these means may influence public policy.
Advances in Autism Research
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This self-study is composed of research presented at the 2017 ASHA Convention Research Symposium, “Advances in Autism Research: From Learning Mechanisms to Novel Interventions.” These journal articles – published as part of a 2018 research forum in the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research – explore the clinical implications of current research on SLPs’ work with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Specific topics include ways to personalize intervention, the interaction between language and executive functioning, how a child’s ability to interact differently with their environment impacts communication, and factors that may influence the development of shape bias, which is an important factor in vocabulary development.
Stuttering: Addressing Child and Parent Attitudes and Behaviors
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Stuttering can have a negative effect on a child’s self-esteem and self-confidence. It also affects parents, who may not understand how to support their child. This journal self-study contains a selection of articles from the October 2018 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology special issue based on sessions and posters from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference. The conference, held every 3 years, seeks to integrate research and clinical practice in fluency disorders. Clinicians will be able to use the specific techniques and activities described in these articles to help parents and children approach stuttering differently and improve outcomes.
Efficacy and Innovations in Telepractice
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Technology has irrefutably expanded the availability of speech and language services to populations that are more difficult to serve due to mobility challenges and/or remote locations. The articles in this journal self-study illustrate how telepractice – including mixed-service delivery models that incorporate both clinic and telepractice components –can enhance telehabilitation and telerehabilitation practices across a range of communication disorders.
Aphasia Treatment: Maximizing Functional Outcomes
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes five recorded sessions from the 2018 online conference “Improving Functional Outcomes in Aphasia.” These sessions discuss specific treatment approaches for particular challenges and deficits that may affect individuals with aphasia. The conference included a total of 15 sessions, giving a comprehensive view of the current landscape of aphasia intervention as well as related subjects, including medical management, neuroplasticity, life participation, assessment, and more. Sessions explored practical treatment strategies to meet the needs of patients across the severity spectrum and in various treatment settings, as well as the unique needs of a range of patient subgroups.
Emotional Competence and Well-Being in Kids With Speech and Language Disorders
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Communication disorders in children may affect social interactions and lead to negative emotional and behavioral outcomes. This journal self-study explores well-being, resilience, and emotional competence in school-age children. The articles discuss ways to identify risk factors to emotional well-being (including victimization and bullying), assess emotional competence, and support emotional expression in children who use AAC. The final article explores counseling and the role the SLP plays in addressing emotional issues as a part of intervention.
Improving Clinical Training for Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Academic programs in audiology and speech-language pathology provide education and training to students preparing for challenging and ever-expanding professions. Finding innovative ways to ensure appropriate training is a constant struggle. In addition, students report high levels of stress as they navigate school demands. This journal self-study explores how programs are using simulation, peer-assisted learning, and mindfulness practice to address these concerns. While focused on academic training, these articles will also benefit clinical supervisors as well as practicing clinicians looking to find new training methods for themselves and colleagues.
Adolescent Language: Beyond the Classroom
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course provides strategies and tips to address communication needs to help adolescents succeed not just in school but beyond the classroom setting. Specific topics include: conversing with peers, transition planning for adolescents moving to secondary education or vocational settings, increasing resilience, and more. The course includes five recorded sessions from the 2018 online conference “Spoken and Written Language in Adolescents: Fresh Solutions.”
Adolescent Language: Success With the School Curriculum
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course provides strategies and tips to help adolescents access the school curriculum and achieve academic success. The course includes five recorded sessions from the 2018 online conference “Spoken and Written Language in Adolescents: Fresh Solutions.”
Best Seller
Children With Autism: Intervention Strategies
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes five recorded sessions from the 2018 online conference “Children With Autism: Matching Interventions to Communication Needs.” Taken together, these sessions highlight practical interventions to support school-age students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), from video modeling to narrative text to behavior-based interventions. The conference included a total of 13 sessions, with the broad goal of presenting current best practices in intervention for school-age students with ASD. Conference sessions focused on tips and strategies SLPs can use to choose the most appropriate interventions for each child using an evidence-based approach that balances family preferences, research, and clinical judgment/expertise.
Children With Autism: School Supports
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes five recorded sessions from the 2018 online conference “Children With Autism: Matching Interventions to Communication Needs.” Taken together, these sessions provide practical strategies for school-based SLPs to improve the school experience for school-age students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The conference included a total of 13 sessions, with the broad goal of presenting current best practices in intervention for school-age students with ASD. Conference sessions focused on tips and strategies SLPs can use to choose the most appropriate interventions for each child using an evidence-based approach that balances family preferences, research, and clinical judgment/expertise.
Exploring Curriculum-Based Language Assessment and Interventions
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Spoken and written language skills underlie all aspects of the school curriculum and are essential for school success. This journal self-study, which includes articles from a Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools clinical forum, addresses ways SLPs can assess and treat language disorders within the context of the school curriculum. The goal of the articles is, as noted in the introductory article, “to establish the school-based SLP as the language and literacy expert for curriculum-based interventions and assessment” (Bourque Meaux, 2018, p.138). The authors in the clinical forum discuss alternate service delivery options and tools for school-based SLPs to use and also explore how SLPs can mentor and educate other school professionals to better support language skills within the school curriculum.
The Role of Risk Factors in Assessment for Communication Disorders
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Clinicians are well-trained in collecting and reporting thorough family and medical case histories of their clients. This information, however, is most often used as a backdrop for direct assessment measures, which are the actual standards for determining eligibility for services. In recent years, the evidence base concerning risk factors for communication disorders has steadily increased. The four articles in this self-study not only demonstrate the significant value of case history information, but suggest that diagnostic standards in the future will weigh risk factors more heavily along with assessment scores.
Best Seller
Assessing and Treating Grammatical Deficits in Children and Young Adults
Format(s): Journal (Online)
English grammar develops in a fairly predictable sequence, and errors are common as children learn grammar rules. Children with language impairments often demonstrate continued difficulty with grammatical morphemes. This journal self-study explores issues related to grammar development, as well as factors to consider when assessing and treating grammar deficits. Clinicians can use this information to improve intervention and optimize grammar development in children with language disorders.
Best Seller
Improving Speech in People With Parkinson’s Disease
Format(s): Journal (Online)
People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) often present with dysarthria and reduced intelligibility. Understanding the nature of these speech deficits and how they affect the individual will improve treatment and speech outcomes. This journal self-study explores how aspects of both the individual (such as native language and experiences with speaking) and treatment conditions (such as task or cue types) affect speech production and intelligibility for people with PD. SLPs can use this information to improve intervention for people with PD and individual perceptions of speech production.
Addressing the Social Needs of People With Communication Disorders
Format(s): Journal (Online)
A communication disorder can have a profound impact on many aspects of a person’s life, including school, work, leisure, and social relationships. Sudden changes, such as those that occur after stroke or other illness, as well as more gradual difficulties, such as those associated with age-related hearing loss, can negatively affect interactions with other people and engagement in daily activities. This journal self-study explores how social networks and feelings of isolation or loneliness may change when a person experiences communication difficulties. It also looks at how well SLPs and audiologists recognize and address the social and emotional needs of their patients during treatment. Clinicians working with older adults with speech, language, and hearing disorders will come away with a better understanding of the impact of social and familial support on patient success and how to better address these needs when planning treatment.
Improving Reading and Writing Outcomes in Young Children
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Literacy skills begin to develop in early childhood, and addressing deficits in reading and writing skills early may prevent later problems in school. This journal self-study explores special situations that may affect literacy skills, including the presence of speech sound disorders, hearing impairment, and cultural and/or socioeconomic differences. It also includes articles that discuss intervention techniques to improve phonological awareness, an important emergent literacy skill. Clinicians can use this information to improve reading and writing assessment and treatment techniques for preschool and early elementary school children.
Social and Vocational Impacts of Voice Disorders
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study explores a variety of issues related to adult vocal health and how voice disorders affect social and work-related interactions. Articles examine prevalence rates of voice disorders among college students; self-reports of vocal use; issues that school workers confront that may affect vocal health; the impact of common workplace issues, such as heating and air conditioning levels, on vocal functioning; and how voice disorders may affect listener processing and comprehension.
Best Seller
Speech Sound Disorders in Preschool and School-Age Children
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Children with speech sound disorders make up a large part of the caseload for many SLPs who work with preschool and school-age children. Speech sound disorders not only affect a child’s ability to communicate at a young age but also may lead to later speech and literacy difficulties. This journal self-study explores issues related to managing speech sound disorders, including assessment and treatment options. It also includes articles that identify predictors of future speech and literacy problems. Clinicians can use this information to help identify appropriate assessment tools and potential treatment options, as well as counsel parents and teachers of children who may be at risk for continuing speech and academic difficulties.
Adolescents and Adults With ASD: Communication Challenges and Intervention Strategies
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes four recorded sessions from the 2017 online conference “Communication Interventions for Adolescents and Adults With Autism.” Taken together, these sessions give a sense of the breadth of communication challenges that adults and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder face. These sessions also explore some distinctive strategies, specifically self-modeling and AAC interventions. The conference included a total of 16 sessions, with the broad goal of giving SLPs tools to help students and clients develop or enhance friendships and strengthen work-life relationships to support their academic and workplace success.
Adolescents and Adults With ASD: Enhancing Social Skills
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes four recorded sessions from the 2017 online conference “Communication Interventions for Adolescents and Adults With Autism.” These sessions focus on strategies to improve social and conversational skills for adults and teens with autism spectrum disorder. The conference included a total of 16 sessions, with the broad goal of giving SLPs tools to help students and clients develop or enhance friendships and strengthen work-life relationships to support their academic and workplace success.
Adolescents and Adults With ASD: Reading, Learning, and Classroom Engagement
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes four recorded sessions from the 2017 online conference “Communication Interventions for Adolescents and Adults With Autism.” These sessions focus on communication interventions related to learning, with the goal of improving reading comprehension, conversation skills, narrative skills, classroom engagement, and curriculum access for adults and teens with autism spectrum disorder. The conference included a total of 16 sessions, with the broad goal of giving SLPs tools to help students and clients develop or enhance friendships and strengthen work-life relationships to support their academic and workplace success.
Assessment and Intervention for Speakers of Nonmainstream English Dialects
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Distinguishing between language disorder and language difference can be a challenge when a child speaks a nonmainstream English dialect. This journal self-study presents research findings that clinicians can implement with this population in their practice. Two of the articles examine modifications to scoring procedures to correct for dialect in assessments for language impairment. The third article explores the validity of a dialect-sensitive assessment tool. The final article examines the effects of a curriculum designed to teach dialectal differences. In total, the assessment and intervention strategies and tools discussed in these articles will allow SLPs to deliver more effective services and promote academic success for children who speak nonmainstream English dialects.
Services for Individuals With Severe Disabilities: A Collaborative Approach
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Individuals with severe disabilities require services from many different providers to address their wide and varied needs. This journal self-study discusses the principles of interprofessional collaborative practice and why this approach may be the most appropriate way to provide services to those with severe disabilities. The articles discuss how interprofessional collaborative practice can improve outcomes for children with severe disabilities and describe specific examples of this type of practice, including suggestions about how SLPs can work with parents and other professionals to improve services for this challenging population. The articles utilize case studies to help illustrate key concepts.
Preschool Language Disorders: Identification and Outcomes Reporting
Format(s): Journal (Online)
A child’s early language development can be used to predict later language and literacy skills, as well as school readiness and academic success. It has long been a challenge to distinguish children who are “late talkers” and will eventually develop age-appropriate language skills from those who might have a language delay that requires intervention. This journal self-study primarily examines issues related to assessing language disorders in preschoolers, in an attempt to identify those children who may be at risk for language and learning difficulties and would benefit from support. Specifically, articles examine risk factors for being a late talker, alternative methods of screening for language impairment, and the usefulness of parent and teacher reports when screening bilingual children. One final article discusses collecting and reporting outcomes for preschool children with speech and language disorders. Clinicians can use this information to improve their approach to language screening and outcomes reporting for preschoolers on their caseload.
Improving Efficiency of Intervention for Children With Language Challenges
Format(s): Journal (Online)
A significant proportion of treatment research aims to determine whether particular interventions are effective in addressing children’s language deficits, but just as important are ways to increase efficiency of these interventions in practice. The articles in this journal self-study examine a range of variables that promote efficiency. The first article manipulates two parameters of dosage—rate and distribution of teaching episodes—and compares the effects on vocabulary learning in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder. The second article examines the dosage parameter of schedule (massed or distributed) on an intervention targeting grammatical morphemes in preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI). The third article examines adequate intensity for vocabulary acquisition for children with SLI during interactive book reading. A final article demonstrates how the addition of one training component in early educator professional development leads to greater efficiency in children’s responses to the same intervention presented in the third article.
Discriminating Childhood Apraxia of Speech From Speech Delay
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Since the first description of a childhood speech disorder similar in presentation to adult onset apraxia of speech, much research has gone into identifying characteristics to help make diagnosis more accurate and reduce the known over-identification of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). However, to date, there has been no conclusive diagnostic marker identified to differentiate CAS from other speech delays. The goal of the articles in this self-study is “to develop and validate a diagnostic marker that discriminates early and persistent CAS from speech delay.” The articles introduce the pause marker (PM) and discuss support for the PM as well as possible clinical and research uses with the development of an assessment tool, the Pause Marker Index (PMI). While the PMI is not yet ready for clinical application, the articles provide clinicians with information about the PM that they can begin to incorporate into assessment and treatment to better serve their clients.
Best Seller
Language Impairment in Adolescents: Impact, Assessment, and Intervention
Format(s): Streaming Video
This video course provides much-needed information on the nature of language development and impairment in adolescents, including the impact of language impairment on adolescents’ academic experiences and interpersonal relations as well as implications for their vocational and social success as adults. Using evidence and case studies, the course offers guidelines and tools for assessment of adolescent language impairment and presents key principles and strategies for intervention.
Best Seller
Interprofessional Collaboration to Support Children With Hearing Loss
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes four recorded sessions from the online conference “Audiology 2016: Collaborative Strategies for Students With Hearing Loss.” These sessions focus on formats for interprofessional collaboration and tools to facilitate this partnership, the nature of central auditory processing disorders (CAPD), and fostering language and literacy development in children. The conference included a total of 15 sessions, with the broad goal of providing practitioners practical, outcome-driven strategies, new information, and resources to help bridge the gap between children and teens with hearing loss, their families, and the educational and medical providers who support them. The four sessions in this course are:
Elements of a Comprehensive Clinical Dysphagia Evaluation
Format(s): Streaming Video
This course describes the elements of a complete clinical dysphagia evaluation – from consultation to instrumental exam – so clinicians can determine the appropriate evaluation tools for the individual patient. The course covers the key points to address in a consultation, how to discern the salient parts of a medical record, how to conduct an informative interview with the patient or caregiver, how to determine what tests and tools to employ in the clinical examination – and how to conduct it – and when to employ instrumentation.
Best Seller
A Parent-Mediated, Play-Based Treatment Program for Autism Spectrum Disorder
Format(s): Streaming Video
This course examines The PLAY Project®, an evidence-based home intervention and consultation program for young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The program uses developmentally appropriate, play-based methods and coaches parents and other caregivers to extend treatment beyond the therapy sessions. The presenter explores the program’s main assessment and intervention principles, highlighting specific techniques and activities. The course also presents multiple case studies as useful examples of children's progress in treatment, the practical challenges of implementing a program, overcoming funding obstacles, and the importance of multicultural awareness in ASD intervention, including the adoption of the model for Ohio’s Part C Early Intervention System and a project that implemented the program with a low-income, underserved population in the Caribbean island country Saint Kitts and Nevis.
Best Seller
Improving Phonological Awareness Skills in Preschool Children
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Phonological awareness – the ability to identify and manipulate sounds in words – has been shown to predict a child’s later reading ability. But phonological awareness does not always develop naturally and thus requires instruction. However, many preschool teachers lack sufficient knowledge of phonological awareness and how to teach it. This journal self-study explores ways to improve phonological awareness instruction in preschools and provides suggestions on how SLPs can help teachers improve their phonological awareness knowledge. Clinicians will find practical tips for working directly with children with phonological awareness deficits and their families or with children enrolled in early education programs who need additional instruction to improve phonological awareness.
Concepts in Voice Therapy
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study addresses issues in voice therapy, starting with an attempt to develop a classification system that captures all of the nuances of voice treatment so that researchers, clinicians, and others involved in treating voice issues can describe what occurs during treatment and identify how those components influence treatment outcomes. Additional articles contribute to the knowledge base of voice treatment by addressing the efficacy of long-used techniques such as phonation through thin tubes and straws, determining the state of the evidence for a specific voice disorder—paradoxical vocal fold motion, studying ways to improve adherence to voice treatment, and exploring the use of mobile biofeedback for learning and carryover. Clinicians treating individuals with voice disorders will benefit from this research that provides insight into the effectiveness of what they do and encourages new ways of thinking about and approaching treatment.

You have added this item to your cart.