CE Courses / New Arrivals

List View
Grid View
31 Products

New!
2021 SLP Coding, Payment, and Compliance Update (Live Webinar)
Event Date: 1/27/2021
Format(s): Live Webinar
This live webinar (January 27, 2021, 3-5 p.m. ET) covers the basic structure, components, and application of the ICD and CPT code sets as well as the very latest coding and compliance requirements for accurate SLP billing in 2021. Participants will receive instruction for correct use of updated CPT codes for communication technology-based services (CTBS) such as e-visits, remote evaluation of patient videos/images, and virtual check-ins. In addition, the speakers will address current status and compliance issues for provision of telepractice services by SLPs.
New!
2021 Coding Updates for Audiologists (Live Webinar)
Event Date: 1/28/2021
Format(s): Live Webinar
In this live webinar (January 28, 2021, 1-3 p.m. ET), members of ASHA’s Health Care Economics Committee will explain and discuss recent coding changes, the 2021 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS), and the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). Speakers will present new and updated procedure codes for vestibular and auditory evoked potential testing, along with billing requirements. The webinar will include clinical examples to illustrate how audiologists should use these codes for proper coding and billing.
New!
Maximizing Outcomes for Medically Complex Patients of All Ages
Event Dates:3/17/2021-3/29/2021
Format(s): Online Conference
The expert presenters in this comprehensive online conference will share essential knowledge and skills to maximize adult and pediatric patient outcomes and help you adapt to real world service delivery challenges. Speakers will focus on the keys to effective assessment and treatment of communication and swallowing disorders across the spectrum of ages and specific medical diagnoses.
New!
Recognizing Microaggressions: Am I Doing That?
Format(s): Micro Course

FREE CE COURSE FOR ASHA MEMBERS THROUGH JANUARY 31, 2021.

Experiencing microaggressions can lead to serious feelings of doubt when it comes to self-worth, productivity, and security. What are microaggressions and microbullying? Am I committing them? How do they impact the person who experiences them? In this course – which is broken into six 5-minute blocks – speaker Noma Anderson illuminates these concepts and guides us through purposeful reflection activities that reduce the likelihood of committing microaggressions, ensuring a safer environment for our colleagues and clients, and thereby facilitating more effective communication. In this course – which is broken into six 5-minute blocks – speaker Noma Anderson illuminates these concepts and guides us through purposeful reflection activities that reduce the likelihood of committing microaggressions, ensuring a safer environment for our colleagues and clients, and thereby facilitating more effective communication.

Member:
From 1 to 1: $20.00 $0.00
New!
Experiencing Microaggressions: How Can I Respond?
Format(s): Micro Course

FREE CE COURSE FOR ASHA MEMBERS THROUGH JANUARY 31, 2021.

People who experience microaggressions feel a range of emotions, frequently including stress, distress, anxiety, insecurity, and decreased feelings of well-being and self-esteem. What can I do when I am a target of a microaggression? What supports can I access? How can I respond effectively? In this course – which is broken into six 5-minute blocks – speaker Noma Anderson explores the impacts of microaggressions, provides tools for responding, and guides us through practicing effective and empowered communication strategies as well as purposeful empathy and reflection to reduce the consequences of these events.

Member:
From 1 to 1: $20.00 $0.00
New!
Witnessing Microaggressions: What Can I Do?
Format(s): Micro Course
As a bystander, we may not recognize a microaggression as it is happening, may not know what to do, or may feel uncomfortable speaking up, but a passive response can significantly exacerbate the consequences. How should we respond when we witness a microaggression? In this course – which is broken into six 5-minute blocks – speaker Noma Anderson explores how to change our natural response as a bystander from passive to productive and guides us through practice activities to improve our ability to recognize microaggressions and increase our confidence in speaking up in support of individuals experiencing these events.
New!
2021 Coding Updates for Audiologists (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
In this on demand webinar (available beginning January 30, 2021), members of ASHA’s Health Care Economics Committee will explain and discuss recent coding changes, the 2021 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS), and the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). Speakers will present new and updated procedure codes for vestibular and auditory evoked potential testing, along with billing requirements. The webinar will include clinical examples to illustrate how audiologists should use these codes for proper coding and billing.
New!
Combatting Microaggressions: How Can I Help?
Format(s): Micro Course
Many people believe in, support, and want to promote fairness, equity, and inclusion, but they often don't know how. What does it mean to be an ally with regards to microaggressions? In this course – which is broken into six 5-minute blocks – speaker Noma Anderson explores practical strategies to eliminate interpersonal and institutional microaggressions and to champion fairness, equity, and inclusion for nondominant groups within our professions and the broader society.
New!
Effects of Aging on Audition
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study course is composed of papers from the 7th Aging and Speech Communication Conference (April 2019). The articles cover a range of topics about speech processing in normal aging, including changes in auditory pathways and cortical structures in older adults with and without hearing loss; the relationship between cognitive skills and hearing performance in older adults; speech perception of older and younger adults when certain linguistic factors are manipulated; and age-related effects of processing accented speech in native and non-native speakers.
New!
Neural Underpinnings of Aphasia Recovery
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study course is composed of papers from the Research Symposium at the 2018 ASHA Convention. The articles summarize much of the accumulating evidence regarding neurological change in post-stroke aphasia recovery. The range of topics covered in this self-study include neurological recovery patterns according to phase of recovery and treatment target (e.g., word vs. sentence), neurological and genetic factors that influence recovery, and methodological considerations to increase validity of findings. These articles will appeal to researchers and clinicians looking for current evidence on dependent neuroplasticity after stroke.
New!
Statistical Methods in Audiology Research
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give audiologists a strong foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice. The articles examine frequential and Bayesian statistical methods as well as propensity scores and linear-mixed model analyses.
New!
2021 SLP Coding, Payment, and Compliance Update (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar (available beginning January 29, 2021) covers the basic structure, components, and application of the ICD and CPT code sets as well as the very latest coding and compliance requirements for accurate SLP billing in 2021. Participants will receive instruction for correct use of updated CPT codes for communication technology-based services (CTBS) such as e-visits, remote evaluation of patient videos/images, and virtual check-ins. In addition, the speakers will address current status and compliance issues for provision of telepractice services by SLPs.
New!
Effective Infection Control Strategies in Schools (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged school personnel to mobilize infection control strategies to protect the health of students, teachers, SLPs, and other school staff. This on demand webinar (available beginning February 18, 2021) will explore evidence-based strategies to improve infection control and promote health within school settings, with a focus on addressing the special needs of children with speech, language, and hearing considerations.
New!
Clinical Considerations for Clients From CLD Backgrounds
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives issue focuses on clinical considerations for working with children and adults from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds. Topics presented include (a) effects of clear speech on perceptions of accentedness in American English, (b) ethnographic interviewing in clinical practice, (c) language errors in bilinguals under background noise and quiet conditions, and (d) assessment of speech sound disorders in school-aged children from CLD backgrounds.
New!
Structural Anomalies Related to Cleft and Craniofacial Conditions
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 5) articles focus on the functional problems caused by the structural anomalies of the craniofacial complex and pathways for intervention. Articles describes the impact of submucous cleft palate, dental/skeletal anomalies, and distraction osteogenesis on speech and resonance outcomes for individuals with craniofacial anomalies. Multidisciplinary roles and best practice recommendations are also provided.
New!
The Impact of Hearing Loss on Language and Literacy
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives forum focuses on the reading outcomes of students with hearing loss and cochlear implants. The first article examines the role of vocabulary on print knowledge for students with hearing loss. The second article provides recommendations for treating the listening and spoken language skills of students with hearing loss based on the results of a 2-year study. The third article compares how reading ability and working memory are impacted in students with cochlear implants and hearing aids after they participated in a computer-based program. The final article explores the relationship between language and reading ability in students with hearing impairment.
New!
Value-Based Health Care Relating to Management of Dysphagia
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This collection of articles presents clinicians with information on an exciting variety of topics, all very currently relevant to caring for patients. Firstly, Cara Donohue and James L. Coyle, and Christina Kang and David Lott, share service delivery focusing on the diagnoses of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and muscle tension dysphagia, respectively. Samantha Shune and Ashwini Namasivayam provide systematic strategies to better support patients’ informal caregivers. Rinki Varindani Desai and Ashwini Namasivayam-MacDonald describe the practice patterns of speech-language pathologists managing dysphagia in persons with dementia. Lastly, Nancy Swigert and Ashley Wright describe effectiveness and efficiency as the key components of a value-based health-care system.
New!
Interprofessional Practice in an International World: 2020
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
First, Krishnan, Sundaram, Sreekumar, Thammaiah, and Mitra describe the development and execution of the Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences in India service learning study abroad program. It includes the perspectives of the faculty leader from the United States and of the faculty and staff from the community partner organizations in India. In the next article, Ramkissoon and Pillay discuss service learning and audiology services in Africa. They highlight health professions engaging in service learning via international humanitarian health care or study abroad programs toward an improved sense of civic responsibility, an aspect that has been inadequately analyzed in hearing health care. Then, Gill, Peele, and Wainscott review the progress made in the treatment and education of persons with disabilities in Zambia, identifying barriers that have hindered change, initiatives that have facilitated positive changes, and initial steps toward the establishment of the profession of speech-language pathology. Despite the challenges of limited resources, understanding of disabilities, and cultural and social barriers, many policies have been adopted and laws passed to protect the rights of those with disabilities. Finally, ASHA Past President Elise Davis-McFarland concludes with a pivotal article, “Ethics in International Practice.” The author states that there is a lack of credible information on the number of people in Majority World countries who have communication and swallowing disorders, but there is evidence of a need for communication therapy services in those countries. She discusses the requirements for the exercise of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice in international practices as well as considering the relationship between cultural authenticity and ethically provided services. The author also reviews the codes of ethics of several Majority World and Minority World speech-language therapy associations and their requirements for the ethical practices that must be adhered to beyond their members’ national borders.
New!
Vestibular and Balance Rehabilitation
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
For people experiencing dizziness, what are possible options for vestibular and balance rehabilitation? This self-study from Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups (SIG 7) addresses treatment choices in vestibular and balance rehabilitation, the state of the evidence on their efficacy, and future directions for interdisciplinary research and practice. Written by clinicians and scholars with expertise in audiology and physical therapy, the four articles present an interdisciplinary and life span approach to vestibular and balance rehabilitation for children and adults. The first article by Christy is on the use of vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy for dizziness in children. Next, the review by Herdman focuses on the evolution of vestibular function tests and rehabilitation for major vestibular disorders as well as areas in which research and clinical practice may grow in the future. In Holmberg, the relatively new but common diagnosis of persistent postural-perceptual dizziness (PPPD) is presented in terms of its pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment protocols. Finally, Clendaniel provides a review on the use of vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Included are detailed photos and illustrations of current techniques and exercises. As described in the introduction to the forum by Guest Editor Neil Shepard, PhD, “It is hoped that these four articles will provide a needed look at vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy (VBRT) so the audiologist can serve as a productive member of the treatment team and have a good understanding as to everything that
New!
Current Issues in Augmentative & Alternative Communication Service Provision
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 12) articles provide information on an assortment of current issues in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) service provision. Specific topics include discussions regarding preparation and training of speech-language pathologists and other stakeholders in the AAC field as well as information regarding culturally competent assessment and intervention. In addition, literacy acquisition using video visual scene displays is introduced and information regarding image color in AAC displays is provided.
New!
Instructional Strategies for Students With ASD
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study course highlights various instructional strategies that demonstrate positive progress for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The findings and recommendations can assist SLPs in choosing strategies that produce targeted outcomes for students with ASD on their caseload.
New!
Unique Current Issues in Dysphagia Management
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This collection of articles presents clinicians with information on some of the most timesensitive topics in dysphagia care of utmost relevance, particularly in the current COVID- 19 pandemic. Firstly, Liza Blumenfeld, Lisa Evangelista, Maggie Kuhn, Kristen Linnemeyer, Nogah Nativ-Zeltzer, and Heather Starmer provide best practice recommendations on the management of patients with head and neck cancers from the speech-language pathology perspective amid COVID-19. Authors Hema Desia and Jennifer Raminick then provide recommendations for safer feeding of infants on high flow oxygen therapy due to acute respiratory failure. Lastly, authors Grainne Brady and Justin Roe, Kellyn Hall and Leslie Johnson, and Annette Askren and Marnie Kershner discuss different aspects of clinician–patient collaborated dysphagia care delivery models and their impact on successful outcomes.
New!
Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Apraxia of Speech
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
First, Julie Case and Maria Grigos provide a review of speech motor control literature in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and give clinical implications to the assessment and treatment of CAS. Second, Kristen Allison reviews approaches to measuring speech intelligibility in children with motor speech disorders. Third, Tricia McCabe, Donna Thomas, and Elizabeth Murray describe Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment (ReST) as a treatment for CAS. Fourth, Nancy Tarshis, Michelle Winner, and Pamela Crooke explore how communication challenges in CAS impact social competency and how speech motor challenges impact social development. Finally, Nina Benway and Jonathan Preston evaluate if features of CAS in the literature could be replicated in a sample of school-age children. Readers will describe how speech motor skills have been found to change with practice in CAS, list the linguistic factors that can influence intelligibility, describe the quality of the research that supports ReST, explain ways to consider social cognition in therapy for CAS, and rank the speech features that distinguish the narrow phonetic transcriptions of children with CAS and speech sound disorders.
New!
Classroom Participation and Reading in Deaf or Hard-of- Hearing Children
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This exercise highlights three articles. First, a qualitative research study with multiple high school student participants with deafness/hearing loss examining factors that promoted versus challenged their access to classroom communication and participation is included. The next article is a preliminary study exploring that children with reading impairments are more likely to fail hearing screenings that children with typical reading skills. Finally, the third article looks at shared book reading and its association with language growth aspects for children who are deaf and hard of hearing over a 4-week training program related to caregiver knowledge of emergent literacy features
New!
Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Cognition Research
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give speech-language pathologists a stronger foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice.
New!
Factors of Graduate and Undergraduate Student Success
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 10) articles explore several issues related to student success. Sylvan, Brock, Perkins, and Garret examine prerequisites required by graduate programs in speech-language pathology across the United States. Roitsch, Murphy, and Raymer investigate the relationship between executive functions and academic outcomes in speech-language pathology graduate students. Richardson, Roberts, and Victor explore ways to predict the clinical success of graduate students studying speechlanguage pathology. Look, Shoemaker, Hoepner, and Blake discover benefits of engaging undergraduate students in research.
New!
Bilingual Fluency/Disfluency in Children and Why Adults Attend Self-Help Groups
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In these Perspectives (SIG 4) articles, two of the articles relate to patterns of disfluency in young bilingual children—one of these two articles adds the patterns of stuttering in young bilingual children that stutter. The third article uses a thematic analysis to help understand why adults who stutter attended self-help groups.
New!
Speech Perception and Production
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This Perspectives (SIG 19) includes four different speech science articles that focus on speech production, speech perception, or both. Akbari and Aoyama examine epenthetic vowels produced by Persian L2 speakers of English corroborating previous research findings regarding acoustical characteristics of anaptyctic epenthetic vowels—prothetic epenthetic vowels differ from the phonemic vowels they precede. Hitchcock et al. examine speech perception of typical adults, typical children, and children with speech sound disorders, finding that children with speech sound disorders differ as compared to both typical groups. Rong conducted a preliminary examination of the articulatory control of speech and speech-like tasks. The results revealed shared and task-specific articulatory features in speech and speech-like tasks, specifically sharing that alternating motion rate tasks may be more useful for assessing temporal aspects of articulation whereas sequential motion rate tasks may be more useful for assessing spatial aspects of articulation and coordination. Lastly, Boyd-Pratt and Donai review evidence that the high frequency region contains perceptual cues regarding segmental, speaker identity, and speaker sex as well as improved speech recognition in the presence of noise.
New!
Clinical Approaches and Practices for the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
First, Katie Strong and Barbara Shadden provide an overview of the relationship between narrative, identity, and social co-construction for persons with aphasia and narrative treatment approaches for identity renegotiation. Second, Jamie Azios and Jack Damico relate the Lifetime Participation Approach to Aphasia (LPAA) and issues in longterm care (LTC) along with practice recommendations for implementing LPAA in LTC. Third, Jerry Hoepner and Tom Sather examine the potential approaches for teaching and mentoring students in LPAA. Fourth, Rochelle Cohen-Schneider, Melodie Chan, Denise McCall, Allison Tedesco, and Ann Abramson explore balancing relationshipcentered care and professionalism. Finally, Sarah Wallace, Elena Donoso Brown, Anna Saylor, Erica Lapp, and Joanna Eskander describe aphasia-friendly modifications for occupational therapy assessments and home programs.
New!
School Age Identification and Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 2) articles focus on approaches for early identification, service delivery, and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the first article, Juliet Haarbauer-Drupa and Michael Brink describe the existing literature on preschool children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and illustrate a model of care for a community. Next, Lori Cook, Nellie Caulkins, and Sandra Chapman explore the potential for cognitive training delivered via telepractice to enhance cognitive performance after mild TBI in adolescence. Lastly, Mary Kennedy offers an update on the evidence the provides possible explanations for speech-language pathologists’ experiences while implementing a coaching approach with college students with TBI.
New!
Clinical Applications of Vestibular Scientific Advancements in Specialized Populations
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 6) articles describe current research, diagnostic, and management techniques for three different vestibular populations, including individuals with Usher Syndrome, Meniere’s Disease, and aging populations. The first article examines age-related changes in vestibular function and discusses findings in animal studies examining specific structural and functional changes occurring within the system. The second article is a review designed to advance understanding of the clinical presentation of individuals with Usher Syndrome and discuss the importance of a multi-disciplinary team in diagnosis and management. Additionally, the latest research in gene-therapy treatments for Usher Syndrome are discussed. The final article is a large scale retrospective study of patients with an active Meniere’s Disease diagnosis. The study examines correlations between disease duration and diagnostic assessment findings.

You have added this item to your cart.