CE Courses / Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)

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Planning AAC Intervention for Children With ASD (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar (available beginning July 17, 2020) will present an organizational framework for planning AAC intervention that maximizes communication for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The course will present strategies to support children with ASD and their communication partners, including clinicians, parents, and teachers. The speaker will define the “mask of attention” for children with ASD; discuss factors that contribute to the challenge of looking behind this mask to increase communication; and demonstrate how to plan and organize a goal-driven AAC intervention session.
Improving Patient Safety and Patient-Provider Communication: A Clinical Forum
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 12) articles provide an introduction to and description of the rationale for implementation of augmentative alternative communication/assistive technology (AAC/AT) in acute care settings. Barriers associated with implementation of AAC/AT in acute care settings are identified and discussed. Data regarding use of the Noddle, a specific access and communication option, are presented and discussed. A series of case studies illustrate potential solutions to a wide range of both patient-specific and institutional implementation problems.
AAC Considerations for Neurogenic Communication Disorders
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 2) articles review and present current issues related to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) across different patient populations, as well as identifies and discusses team-based interprofessional practice approaches for managing individuals with complex communication needs within both pediatric and adult populations. In the first article, Shannon Taylor, Sarah Jane Wallace, and Sarah Elizabeth Wallace explore factors that influence successful use of high-technology AAC in persons with poststroke aphasia via a literature review and narrative synthesis methodology. Lori Marra and Katie Micco present a clinical focus article that assesses communication partner’s perception regarding the effectiveness of a training model to support AAC use within a parent–adolescent communication pair. Michelle Westley, Dean Sutherland, and H. Timothy Bunnell examine the experience of healthy voice donors during the ModelTalker voice banking process for New Zealand-accent synthesized voices. Sarah Diehl and Michael de Reisthal describe the complex symptoms associated with Huntington’s disease and how they influence implementation of AAC to address the communication needs of this population. Kristen Abbott-Anderson, Hsinhuei Sheen Chiou, and Brooke N. Burk address interprofessional practice via a multidisciplinary patient-centered engagement experience entitled Spring EngAGEment that serves individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease or other associated dementias. Finally, Laura Hinkes Molinaro, and Wendy Stellpflug discuss a team approach for education and support of patients and families with postoperative pediatric cerebellar mutism syndrome.
Innovations in AAC Assessment, System Design, and Communication Partner Training
Format(s): Journal (Online)
SLPs who work with children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) need a broad base of knowledge in evidence-based assessment, system designs, and implementation practices, particularly as technological innovations in AAC proliferate. This journal self-study explores of all of the above. The first article provides a useful framework for assessment that distinguishes essential components according to the child’s motor and cognitive abilities. Two articles examine design features: The first examines consistency of symbol location to increase efficiency, and the second looks at characteristics of naturalistic displays and their effects on gaze behavior according to clinical profiles. The final article in this self-study reviews practices for training communication partners of children who use AAC.
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Emergent Literacy and AAC for All Ages (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Emergent learners who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) – no matter their age – can benefit from literacy instruction. This webinar reviews important elements of literacy and language instruction, especially for those who are early in their AAC use and language development. The presenter discusses the elements of a strong literacy curriculum – including a voice for all, learner engagement, an enthused knowledgeable reader, the alphabet, actual text, and shared environments and experiences – and how SLPs can incorporate them when working with AAC users on language and literacy goals.
Perspectives, SIG 12, Vol. 3, Part 4, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In these articles, the authors explore augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) that are bilingual and use English as a second language. Authors also reflect on the cultural and diverse children that use AAC. McNamara considers the established research in bilingualism in the typically developing population and those with speech language disorders to propose guidelines for best practice in bilingual AAC. Yu reviews topics that include studies comparing the developmental outcomes between monolingual and bilingual children on the autism spectrum and studies on the role of home language development in English acquisition. The purpose of Mindel and John’s article is to increase the competency of school-based speech language pathologists who are increasingly working with culturally and linguistically diverse student populations using AAC. Johnston, O’Neill, and Schumann’s article provides interventionists with a strategy for comparing the efficiency of initial graphic symbol acquisition in an individual’s first and second language for English language learners who use AAC during functional communication training. McNamara considers the established research in bilingualism in the typically developing population and those with speech language disorders to propose guidelines for best practice in bilingual AAC. Wagner outlines some commonly heard questions and concerns professional and families share with regards to bilingual AAC intervention and shares some resources for selecting, customizing, and designing robust bilingual AAC system, strategies for teaching core words each month and ways to incorporate both paper-based and electronic-based AAC tools. Solomon-Rice and Soto discuss project scholars who receive evidence-based training in AAC assessment, AAC intervention, collaborative teaming, AAC applications supporting the language and literacy of culturally and linguistically diverse children, and professional development in collaborate AAC settings.
Perspectives, SIG 12, Vol. 3, Part 3, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
Hurting, Alper, and Berkowitz discussed the financial and ethical implications of preventable adverse events. The authors stress the need to use a multipronged approach, which increases awareness of and support for speech-language pathology services. Ogletree, McMurry, Schmidt, and Evans considered the three realities facing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) providers. These included: (a) users who are not homogeneous with respect to culture and language, (b) a traditional team-based AAC assessment process that may not be the preferred route, and (c) assumptions about AAC symbol transparency that are not supported by data. Caron, Holyfield, Light, and McNaughton explored displaced talk using video visual speech displays (VSDs). The findings revealed that there is potential in utilizing video VSD to support participation for displaced talk in individuals with autism spectrum disorder. When using VSD’s, the individual in the study takes more communication turns and is more engaged in his social interactions.
Perspectives, SIG 12, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
In these articles, authors explored various alternative access methods for augmentative and alternative communication with a variety of populations. One author introduces brain-computer interfaces (BCIs, reviews both the misconceptions about them and the important factors to consider when evaluating a BCI for use by someone with CCN. In another article, the author describes advances in access technology already being employed as access solutions to SGD’s and highlights areas for advancement and refinements of access technologies. Another author reviews research evidence related to eye tracking and gaze technologies with various populations. The final article focuses on teaching switch access for individuals who have significant communication, physical and sensory disabilities and who are unable to use direct selection. In this article, the use of switch access with scanning is explored in terms of how to teach motor/cognitive aspects with aided language receptive input and expressive use.
Effective Solutions to Ethical Dilemmas in AAC (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can be life-changing for many individuals, but due to its complex and commercial nature, it also comes with a myriad of potential ethical concerns. Clinicians can improve AAC assessment and intervention outcomes for those they serve by being confident they are making ethically informed decisions about AAC use. This webinar uses case studies to discuss common ethical dilemmas encountered in the use of AAC, leaning on the ASHA Code of Ethics for support. The presenter outlines a process for ethical decision-making and shares trends in school and health care settings that affect ethical decision-making as it relates to AAC use.
Enhancing AAC for Adults
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study explores preferences about topics and types of visual supports as well as information about how people who use AAC can expand their communication using social media. Clinicians working with adults who use AAC can apply this information to improve decisions about methods and types of communication supports and maximize patient success.
Improving AAC for Children
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) often benefits children with severe disabilities. The most effective AAC systems consider the child’s individual needs and support learning and social interactions. This journal self-study explores ways to improve AAC systems to increase language skills, allow for more active participation in communication, and encourage emotional competence. Incorporating parent perceptions about AAC use into decision-making is also discussed, as are the benefits of peer involvement in communication using AAC. Clinicians will be able to incorporate strategies discussed to enhance services for children using AAC.
Best Seller
A Roadmap to Integrating AAC Into the Classroom
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This webinar will explore how augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can be effectively integrated into the classroom. The presenter will share a roadmap to walk SLPs through the particular considerations and decision-making process for selecting and implementing AAC in an educational setting. The webinar will explore the importance of the SETT Framework and a core vocabulary organization as well as highlight specific strategies for programming an AAC device, including modeling and color coding.

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