CE Courses / Audiologic Rehabilitation and Treatment

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Classroom Participation and Reading in Deaf or Hard-of- Hearing Children
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This exercise highlights three articles. First, a qualitative research study with multiple high school student participants with deafness/hearing loss examining factors that promoted versus challenged their access to classroom communication and participation is included. The next article is a preliminary study exploring that children with reading impairments are more likely to fail hearing screenings that children with typical reading skills. Finally, the third article looks at shared book reading and its association with language growth aspects for children who are deaf and hard of hearing over a 4-week training program related to caregiver knowledge of emergent literacy features
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Research Symposium in Hearing: Cellular-Level Diagnosis and Personalized Therapy of Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Format(s): eWorkshop
The presenters discuss their work on optical imaging of the inner ear to enable progress in understanding, diagnosing, and treating human sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Next, they illustrate their approach to develop personalized therapies for SNHL, using vestibular schwannoma as an example. Finally, they demonstrate the promise of gene therapy, nanotechnology, and computational drug repositioning. This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention.
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SOS, DARN, and TEA: Problem-Solving With Adults Who Have Hearing Loss
Format(s): eWorkshop
Comprehensive auditory rehabilitation for adults includes communication strategies, assistive listening devices, perceptual training, and supportive counseling. The problem-solving format allows an engaging and patient-centered means of addressing communication strategies and counseling needs. This presentation addresses the organization of problem-solving using the problem-solving approach (SOS); distance, angle, reverberation, and noise (DARN); and thinking, emotional response, and action (TEA). This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention.
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Equilibrium Throughout the Life Span: New Horizons for Audiology
Format(s): eWorkshop
The evaluation and non-medical management of balance disorders in children and adults is an exciting and growing opportunity for audiologists to participate in this important aspect of health care services. This presentation highlights the most common conditions throughout the life span from neonate to geriatric and includes an evidence-based clinical pathway model of gold-standard evaluation protocols and management strategies. This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention. This session was developed by, and presenter invited by, SIG 6: Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics.
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Factors That Exacerbate or Ameliorate Listening Effort in Children Who Are Hard of Hearing
Format(s): eWorkshop
Listening effort is the allocation of mental resources to overcome obstacles in goal pursuit while listening. Sustained increased effort has important developmental implications. Factors that increase access to acoustic cues can reduce listening effort. This presentation addresses the measurement of listening effort, in addition to how language and auditory input affect effort in children who are hard of hearing. This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention. The session was developed by, and presenters invited by, Hearing and Vestibular - Assessment and Intervention: Pediatric and Listening, Language, and Speech in Children who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing.
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The Vanderbilt Fatigue Scale: Subjective Fatigue in Pediatric Hearing Loss & in Additional Disabilities
Format(s): eWorkshop
Recent studies have implicated fatigue as an important consequence of listening effort, but the impact of fatigue on children is poorly understood. One problem is the lack of a measure of listening-related fatigue. In this presentation, the presenters (1) introduce the construct of listening-related fatigue, and (2) describe the development and validation of the Vanderbilt Fatigue Scale designed to quantify listening-related fatigue. This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention.
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Differential Diagnoses in Children With Hearing Loss: Unpacking the Concerns of Over-Diagnosis, Under-Diagnosis, & Comorbidity
Format(s): eWorkshop
Despite advances in hearing technology and intervention, language, academic, and social outcomes in children with hearing loss generally lag behind those of their hearing counterparts. Providing differential diagnoses is challenging, given the cascading effects of auditory deprivation language delays. This presentation identifies commonly occurring comorbid presentations in children with hearing loss and describes the process of effectively making differential diagnoses. This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention.
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Overview & Case Studies of Bone Conduction Hearing Devices Across the Life Span
Format(s): eWorkshop
This presentation provides an overview of the clinical use of bone conduction hearing devices across the life span. It includes information about clinically available devices, guidelines related to non-surgical and surgical options, and pediatric and adult case studies. The presenters highlight key components of patient assessment, candidacy criteria, and device fitting. This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention. The session was developed by, and presenters invited by, Hearing and Vestibular - Assessment and Intervention: Pediatric, Audiology Implantables, and Hearing, Vestibular, Tinnitus: Assessment and Intervention: Adult.
Evaluation and Management of Challenging Patient  Populations in Audiology
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 6) articles focus on diagnostic tools and considerations for management of several challenging patient populations in audiology. The first article discusses utilizing magnetic resonance imaging to determine the functional and structural neural alterations associated with chronic tinnitus. Researchers are utilizing advanced imaging techniques to study variability in perceptual characteristics and reaction to tinnitus. The second article discusses the continuum of disorders known as “cortical hearing impairment,” supported by a comprehensive summary of clinical presentations. Despite its rarity, an audiologist must understand etiologies of cortical hearing impairment and know how to evaluate and characterize the accompanied hearing difficulty. The third article examines the effects of concussion of the vestibular system and presented an assessment battery for athletes postconcussion and for determining return to play.
Clinical Topics in Audiology and Public Health
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 8) articles cover a wide range of audiology and public health topics. Konrad-Martin and colleagues promote effective and standardized coding and third payer billing practices for the audiological management of symptomatic ototoxicity. The article includes relevant ICD-10-CM codes and CPT codes. Myers and Dundas provide a review of the effects of noise on the vestibular system. They note that temporary and permanent effects of noise on the vestibular system have been reported and advocate for further investigations to unpack the complex relationship between the auditory and vestibular systems. Finally, Pletnikova and colleagues conducted a quality initiative project to determine the feasibility and reliability of a tablet-based portable audiometer to identify hearing loss in a cognitively impaired population.
Pediatric Auditory Brainstem Implants, Adult Single-Sided Deafness, and Teaching
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 9) articles include topics on evidence, research, and application about pediatric auditory brainstem implants, teaching phonological awareness in young children, and development of The Assessment and Aural Rehabilitation Tool for single-sided deafness in adults.
Topics in Aural Rehabilitation
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
These Perspectives (SIG 7) articles address therapy, patient education/counseling, and novel eHealth programs to serve clients across the lifespan. The topic of multisensory integration is addressed with a review of cognitive neuroscience literature and recommendations are made for therapy protocols for infants and children with hearing loss. There is a review of the development and outcomes of a multimedia education program for adults with hearing loss. The use of eHealth in patient-centered care for adults with hearing loss is considered for current practice and its future directions. Authors discuss considerations for the use of remote microphone technology by the oldest generation of patients. Finally, patient-centered strategies for communication during audiology consultations are presented to build trust and positive therapeutic relationships.
Research Highlights in Audiology: 2018
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This self-study features highly read and cited audiology research articles published in 2018 in ASHA’s scholarly journals. Topics reflect the diversity of the field and include: (1) what users need to know to effectively manage hearing aids, (2) how language skills develop in children with cochlear implants, and (3) information available on social media about tinnitus.
Patient Care and Management for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study focuses on several aspects of patient care and management for practitioners who serve children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The articles, originally published in a 2014 issue of Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, discuss the unique needs of children with mild, minimal, and/or unilateral hearing loss; the effects of fatigue on children with hearing loss; and the importance of monitoring speech-language performance and progress as well as hearing aid use in this population.
Research Highlights in Audiology: 2017
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This self-study features highly read and cited audiology research articles published in 2017 in ASHA’s scholarly journals. Topics reflect the diversity of the field and include: (1) a discussion of the economic impact of hearing loss in the U.S., (2) ways to improve museum accessibility for people with hearing loss, (3) how improvements in early detection of hearing loss has impacted children’s literacy outcomes, and (4) the impact of an audiologist’s language on hearing aid uptake.
Hearing Loss and Dementia (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
The association between hearing loss and dementia has received significant press coverage. This webinar explores this association and discusses clinical implications. The speaker reviews the literature surrounding hearing loss and dementia to better describe the association, explains potential mechanistic pathways, and describes practical impacts on clinical practice.
Perspectives, SIG 6, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The first article discusses how electrophysiological measures can supplement traditional audiometric evaluation in assessment of age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Perceptual consequences of ARHL in part, can be attributed to a reduced ability to accurately process temporal and frequency cues of speech. The frequency following response and cortical-auditory evoked potential measures may be used to identify deficits in the neural processing of speech and guide management of ARHL. The second article shares current evidence supporting an association between cognitive impairment and hearing loss. Research is ongoing to determine whether management of hearing loss with amplification devices and auditory rehabilitation reduces the risk for cognitive decline. The third article highlights a novel pharmaceutical intervention for ARHL. Specifically, the paper focused on AUT00063, a small molecule that modifies a critical ion channel, Kv3, involved in repolarization of a neural action potential within the central auditory pathway. The final article focuses on the aspects of cognition that are most relevant to behavioral auditory research and provides an overview of cognitive hearing science, auditory neuroscience, and electrophysiological measures ideal for studying how the brain processes speech.
Perspectives, SIG 7, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
The theme for these articles is using technology to enhance aural rehabilitation for adults with hearing loss. Manchaiah introduces the issues related to direct-to-consumer hearing devices. Major topics include important definitions, a summary of the literature, and discussion of risks and benefits associated with the use of direct-to-consumer devices by adults with hearing loss. Olson and colleagues summarize current mobile apps for auditory training designed for adult learners. Mobile apps for smartphones and tablets were reviewed for their content, usability, and potential clinical applications as supplements to aural rehabilitation outside of the clinical setting or in lieu of direct service delivery. Leavitt reviews considerations for individualized recommendations of wireless connectivity to link hearing aids or cochlear implants with other devices such as telephones, remote microphones, induction loops, infrared and personal FM systems. The article includes a process for decision-making and documentation of clinical data to support individualized recommendations. In summary, the articles address three areas of technology in aural rehabilitation for adults that are currently evolving and clinically applicable.
Perspectives, SIG 9, Vol. 2, Part 2, 2017
Format(s): SIG Perspectives and Exam
This part of Perspectives covers a diverse range of topics including a review of auditory verbal therapy, reducing bullying for children who are D/HH, the current state of audiology services for central auditory processing, and, finally, guiding parents in managing their child's behavior in order to increase hearing aid use. The articles provide current practical information for clinicians who serve children who are deaf and hard of hearing, including audiologists, early interventionists, speech-language pathologists, and teachers.
Cutting-Edge Issues in Audiology: Assessment and Treatment
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes five recorded sessions from the online conference “Audiology 2017: Cutting-Edge Perspectives in Service Delivery for Older Adults.” These sessions present assessment and intervention strategies for older patients. The conference included a total of 17 sessions, with the broad goal of presenting audiologists with innovative approaches to managing hearing loss and improving service delivery for older adults.
Cutting-Edge Issues in Audiology: The Aging Patient
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes five recorded sessions from the online conference “Audiology 2017: Cutting-Edge Perspectives in Service Delivery for Older Adults.” These sessions discuss pressing issues that commonly affect older patients along with their hearing loss. The conference included a total of 17 sessions, with the broad goal of presenting audiologists with innovative approaches to managing hearing loss and improving service delivery for older adults.
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Exposing Hidden Hearing Loss
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Noise exposure and aging are common causes of acquired sensorineural hearing loss, marked by damaged hair cells and evident in threshold audiograms. Recent studies have shown that well before overt hearing loss is apparent, a more insidious process frequently occurs, one that doesn’t kill hair cells, but instead permanently interrupts their communication with cochlear neurons. This cochlear synaptic loss can be dramatic, even in ears with normal threshold audiograms, where it has been called “hidden hearing loss.” This webinar will review hidden and overt effects of noise and aging on the ear and hearing, focusing on documented synaptopathic and neurodegenerative outcomes and predicted functional consequences, including speech-in noise difficulties, tinnitus, and hyperacusis.
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Improving Communication Outcomes for Children With Hearing Aids
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Initiatives such as universal newborn hearing screening and early hearing detection and intervention programs have improved the early identification of hearing loss so children can receive intervention services at a young age. But many of these children still experience significant delays in communication development as they get older. This webinar will discuss what audiologists and speech-language pathologists can do to support optimal communication outcomes in children who use hearing aids. The webinar will explore evidence-based assessment of audibility, monitoring and supporting consistent hearing aid use, and tools for documenting outcomes.
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Hearing and Cognition in Older Adults
Format(s): Journal (Online)
As people age, they often experience a variety of health-related issues, including hearing loss and memory difficulties. This journal self-study explores the relationship between hearing loss and cognitive functioning and considers what is known about age-related cognitive decline and how it may be influenced by hearing loss and the use of amplification. As the primary provider of hearing-related services for older adults, audiologists are in a position to address cognitive issues and assist patients and families. This journal course discusses strategies on how to do so effectively.
Hearing Aids and the Brain: Implications for Auditory Rehabilitation
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Many seniors are exposed to considerable amounts of information about hearing loss and hearing health and can find it difficult to separate facts from fiction. Meanwhile, others do not get enough information about these important topics. This webinar will explore educational tools and resources to help older adults meet their individual communication needs. The presenter will share information and resources that you can pass on to your patients regarding hearing aids and the brain, as well as tools to promote healthy hearing as patients age.
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New Directions for Auditory Training
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Technological advances have led to a number of options for auditory training for individuals with hearing loss. This self-study, based on articles from a research forum published in the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, looks at contemporary issues in auditory training to assist clinicians in developing therapeutic programs that better target individual needs and aid generalization. The first article summarizes a useful framework in which to view developments in auditory training. Two articles examine ways to effectively individualize training materials so that clients will make the most gains in treatment. Finally, a fourth article considers a number of factors that may help clinicians predict who will benefit most from these interventions.
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Interprofessional Collaboration to Support Children With Hearing Loss
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes four recorded sessions from the online conference “Audiology 2016: Collaborative Strategies for Students With Hearing Loss.” These sessions focus on formats for interprofessional collaboration and tools to facilitate this partnership, the nature of central auditory processing disorders (CAPD), and fostering language and literacy development in children. The conference included a total of 15 sessions, with the broad goal of providing practitioners practical, outcome-driven strategies, new information, and resources to help bridge the gap between children and teens with hearing loss, their families, and the educational and medical providers who support them. The four sessions in this course are:
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Early Hearing Detection and Intervention: Issues and Trends
Format(s): Journal (Online)
For many years, states have been following national guidelines for universal newborn hearing screenings to help identify children with hearing loss and coordinate follow-up. Yet there are still significant numbers of children who are lost to follow-up and do not receive timely care. This journal self-study explores issues related to early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI), including what data are collected, how process changes may affect follow-up, which factors appear to most influence follow-up after the identification of hearing loss, and whether or not adding genetic testing to the newborn hearing screening process will aid in the detection of at-risk children. The self-study also looks at what can be done to support parents of children with hearing loss and how identification after the newborn period influences the timeliness of service delivery. Clinicians who work with newborns with hearing loss will benefit from learning more about the obstacles that prevent families from obtaining timely services and ways to assist other professionals and parents to ensure optimal care.
Addressing Auditory Access in Schools: Models of Effective Collaboration
Format(s): Streaming Video
Audiologists and SLPs routinely work with other professionals and stakeholders to provide services. Finding a place on the team and working effectively and efficiently on that team is often easier said than done. This course will utilize case examples that explore how to overcome common challenges to working on interprofessional teams, hindrances to effective teams, and why high-functioning teams are critical to successful outcomes, as well as provide practical strategies to improve auditory access to classroom learning for students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing.

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