CE Courses / Cultural Responsiveness

List View
Grid View
32 Products

New!
Enhancing Cultural Competence: Working in Native American and Tribal Communities
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study focuses on rationale and techniques for enhancing clinicians’ cultural competence when working in Native American and tribal communities. The articles, originally published in a 2016 issue of Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups (SIG 14, Cultural and Linguistic Diversity), address the lasting impact of historical trauma on health and education; the importance of differentiated instruction; the perspective of a student with hearing loss who experiences traditional cultural education; and speech-language intervention programs and services in Native communities.
New!
Evidence-Based Practices for Treating Language Disorders in Dual Language Learners
Format(s): Journal (Online)
SLPs are working with an increasing number of children and families who identify as bilingual, multilingual, or dual language learners (DLLs). Researchers are exploring strategies that are most effective for treating DLLs with language disorders and are also evaluating cultural differences related to family expectations in order to improve the validity of interventions. This journal self-study explores how family expectations can impact the effectiveness of interventions, how expectations may vary across cultures, and what SLP interventions are considered evidence-based when working with DLLs and culturally and linguistically diverse families. These articles are from a two-part forum – Innovations in Clinical Practice for Dual Language Learners – published in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.
New!
Evidence-Based Practices to Improve Assessment of Dual Language Learners
Format(s): Journal (Online)
SLPs are tasked with evaluating dual language learners (DLLs), often without speaking the language the child uses most. New research is emerging to help SLPs better assess DLLs while considering their unique linguistic skills as well as their cultural diversity. This journal self-study explores emerging practices that SLPs can use to improve overall assessment quality and outcomes when working with diverse DLLs.
New!
Recognizing Microaggressions: Am I Doing That?
Format(s): Micro Course

Experiencing microaggressions can lead to serious feelings of doubt when it comes to self-worth, productivity, and security. What are microaggressions and microbullying? Am I committing them? How do they impact the person who experiences them? In this course – which is broken into six 5-minute blocks – speaker Noma Anderson illuminates these concepts and guides us through purposeful reflection activities that reduce the likelihood of committing microaggressions, ensuring a safer environment for our colleagues and clients, and thereby facilitating more effective communication. In this course – which is broken into six 5-minute blocks – speaker Noma Anderson illuminates these concepts and guides us through purposeful reflection activities that reduce the likelihood of committing microaggressions, ensuring a safer environment for our colleagues and clients, and thereby facilitating more effective communication.

New!
Experiencing Microaggressions: How Can I Respond?
Format(s): Micro Course

People who experience microaggressions feel a range of emotions, frequently including stress, distress, anxiety, insecurity, and decreased feelings of well-being and self-esteem. What can I do when I am a target of a microaggression? What supports can I access? How can I respond effectively? In this course – which is broken into six 5-minute blocks – speaker Noma Anderson explores the impacts of microaggressions, provides tools for responding, and guides us through practicing effective and empowered communication strategies as well as purposeful empathy and reflection to reduce the consequences of these events.

New!
Witnessing Microaggressions: What Can I Do?
Format(s): Micro Course
As a bystander, we may not recognize a microaggression as it is happening, may not know what to do, or may feel uncomfortable speaking up, but a passive response can significantly exacerbate the consequences. How should we respond when we witness a microaggression? In this course – which is broken into six 5-minute blocks – speaker Noma Anderson explores how to change our natural response as a bystander from passive to productive and guides us through practice activities to improve our ability to recognize microaggressions and increase our confidence in speaking up in support of individuals experiencing these events.
New!
Combatting Microaggressions: How Can I Help?
Format(s): Micro Course
Many people believe in, support, and want to promote fairness, equity, and inclusion, but they often don't know how. What does it mean to be an ally with regards to microaggressions? In this course – which is broken into six 5-minute blocks – speaker Noma Anderson explores practical strategies to eliminate interpersonal and institutional microaggressions and to champion fairness, equity, and inclusion for nondominant groups within our professions and the broader society.
New!
Beyond Standard Scores: Speech-Language Assessment of Dual Language Learners
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Reliance on standardized test scores can be a major contributor to misdiagnosis of dual language learners with speech and language impairment. In this new course, join a panel of experts to explore standardized tests and misdiagnosis, policy support and advocacy for multilingual assessment, and best practices in least biased evaluation for eligibility determination.
Clinical Considerations for Clients From CLD Backgrounds
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This Perspectives issue focuses on clinical considerations for working with children and adults from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds. Topics presented include (a) effects of clear speech on perceptions of accentedness in American English, (b) ethnographic interviewing in clinical practice, (c) language errors in bilinguals under background noise and quiet conditions, and (d) assessment of speech sound disorders in school-aged children from CLD backgrounds.
Interprofessional Practice in an International World: 2020
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
First, Krishnan, Sundaram, Sreekumar, Thammaiah, and Mitra describe the development and execution of the Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences in India service learning study abroad program. It includes the perspectives of the faculty leader from the United States and of the faculty and staff from the community partner organizations in India. In the next article, Ramkissoon and Pillay discuss service learning and audiology services in Africa. They highlight health professions engaging in service learning via international humanitarian health care or study abroad programs toward an improved sense of civic responsibility, an aspect that has been inadequately analyzed in hearing health care. Then, Gill, Peele, and Wainscott review the progress made in the treatment and education of persons with disabilities in Zambia, identifying barriers that have hindered change, initiatives that have facilitated positive changes, and initial steps toward the establishment of the profession of speech-language pathology. Despite the challenges of limited resources, understanding of disabilities, and cultural and social barriers, many policies have been adopted and laws passed to protect the rights of those with disabilities. Finally, ASHA Past President Elise Davis-McFarland concludes with a pivotal article, “Ethics in International Practice.” The author states that there is a lack of credible information on the number of people in Majority World countries who have communication and swallowing disorders, but there is evidence of a need for communication therapy services in those countries. She discusses the requirements for the exercise of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice in international practices as well as considering the relationship between cultural authenticity and ethically provided services. The author also reviews the codes of ethics of several Majority World and Minority World speech-language therapy associations and their requirements for the ethical practices that must be adhered to beyond their members’ national borders.
Attn Supervisors: Reframe Your Thinking About Cultural Diversity (SIG 11) (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar will focus on the impact of diversity on the supervisory relationship and the importance of cultural competence in clinical supervision. Speakers will examine the influence that language, labeling, stereotyping, and implicit bias have on the supervisor and supervisee, as well as discuss strategies and techniques to improve cultural competencies for supervising SLPs and audiologists. The webinar will review the literature on diversity and cultural competence in supervision; discuss biases, power imbalance, cultural humility, and self-analysis; and include case studies and activities that provide supervisors an opportunity to consider their own cultural identity and ways in which this identity influences their supervisory alliance. This webinar – part of the SIGnature Series – was developed by SIG 11: Administration and Supervision.
Marginalized Students: Bandwidth Recovery for Academic and Clinical Success (SIG 10)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This course explores factors that diminish the cognitive capacity of communication sciences and disorders (CSD) students, including poverty, racism, and discrimination based on socially marginalized identities, including disability. The COVID-19 pandemic and social unrest have created a daily reality of uncertainty, taking up a lot of bandwidth. Although these issues affect everyone in some way, they impact marginalized groups with greater severity. In this course, the speakers share ideas for the classroom and clinical environments to provide instructors and clinical supervisors with practical strategies to help students recover the bandwidth they need to learn and thrive. Speakers discuss the clinical implications of welcoming a diverse group of students into CSD programs and ways to support them. This course – part of the SIGnature Series – was developed by SIG 10: Issues in Higher Education.
Personnel Preparation for Multicultural Aspects of Communication Disorders (SIG 14)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This course explores how instructors and clinical supervisors can address multicultural aspects of speech-language pathology and audiology practice and encourage productive discussions on difficult topics among people who may start with varied experiences and perspectives. Members of ASHA's Faculty Development Institute (AFDI) demonstrate how to incorporate culturally responsive activities and assignments into class or in-service presentations. Presenters provide self-assessment and reflection strategies and additional resources for preparing students to be socially responsive, global citizens and culturally competent clinicians. This course – part of the SIGnature Series – was developed by SIG 14: Cultural and Linguistic Diversity.
Teaching Cultural Competence in Basic Speech Science Courses (SIG 19) (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar will demonstrate how to incorporate cultural and linguistic diversity in an authentic way when teaching basic speech science courses. Speakers will provide examples of teaching activities for speech science, anatomy, and phonetics courses to expand students’ perspectives on foundational science concepts and help them develop an appreciation for the diversity present in speech production. The webinar will address dialects in American English (phonetics), anatomical correlates versus learned behaviors associated with gender differences (anatomy and physiology), and acoustic measures associated with sexual orientation. This webinar – part of the SIGnature Series – was developed by SIG 19: Speech Science.
The History of African American Language (SIGs 14 and 17) (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar (available beginning November 21, 2020) will explore how the history of African American Language (AAL) relates to culturally sensitive and responsive practices in communication disorders. The webinar will feature first-time screenings of several excerpts from “The History of African American Language,” one episode of a documentary series sequel to the Emmy Award-winning “Talking Black in America.” During the webinar, sociolinguist Walt Wolfram and African American Language scholar and SLP Orlando Taylor will discuss the impacts of the history of African American Language on clinical practices for professionals working with individuals who speak AAL. This webinar – part of the SIGnature Series – was developed by SIG 14: Cultural and Linguistic Diversity and SIG 17: Global Issues in Communication Sciences and Related Disorders.
History and Collaborative Efforts in  the International Cluttering Association
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 17) articles present a collaborative initiative of the Committee of International Representatives of the International Cluttering Association. Reichel et al., discuss the initiative that began with the Inaugural Joint World Congress in Japan in 2018. Van Zaalen and Reichel present and discuss the auditory-visual feedback training methodology. Gosselin and Ward affirm that cluttering is a fluency disorder that is mainly characterized by an abnormally rapid or irregular rate of speech. Their pilot study expanded the evidence base by using a Stroop Task to investigate attention performance in people with cluttering. Hilda Sønsterud discuss the term working alliance as an important concept in cluttering and stuttering therapy and describe the degree to which the therapy dyad is engaged in collaborative, purposive work.
Global Initiatives: Considerations for Best Practice
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 17) articles discuss different aspects of international practice, including work with immigrant and refugee families. Baigorri, Crowley, and Bukari provide a service delivery model for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and professionals working in low-and middle-income countries. Chakraborty, Schwarz, and Vaughan discuss a major consideration for ASHA to cultivate cultural sensitivity and competence in its largely female (95.30%), monolingual (93.46%) and white (92.10%) workforce. Chu et al., discuss the challenges that SLPs face when providing speech and language therapy in Malaysia and issues that need to be addressed for continued growth of this profession. Maldonado, Ashe, Bubar, and Chapman explore the experiences of monolingual, American, English-speaking SLPs and Clinical Fellows who worked with immigrant and refugee families within a preschool context. Staley et al., consider the literature on international student placements to contextualize and describe a 10-year relationship which enabled speech language pathology students in their final year of study at a Canadian university to complete a 10-week clinical placement with a non-governmental organization in Kenya.
Cultural Competence, Adult Bilingual Fluency, and LGBTQ Clients
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 14) articles topics include (a) the effects of an experiential learning opportunity on undergraduates’ cultural competence; (b) a description of an LGBTQ content module that can be integrated into coursework on cultural and linguistic diversity; and (c) fluency strategies for treating bilingual adults who stutter.
Best Seller
Assessment and Communication Development of Bilingual Children (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Whether they themselves are monolingual or bilingual, SLPs must be able to conduct communication assessments with bilingual children. During the assessment process, clinicians must determine whether a child is following a typical process of dual language acquisition or exhibiting an atypical pattern of development. This webinar discusses typical communication development in bilingual children and explore valid assessment practices for this population. The speaker addresses common questions from bilingual and monolingual clinicians regarding appropriate assessment and reporting procedures, including what to do during early stages of English language acquisition and how to prevent language loss.
Perspectives, SIG 14, Vol. 3, Part 3, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This Perspectives issue focused on training clinicians to provide the most appropriate services for people in the LGBTQ community. Topics included; (a) a tutorial on how to design a transgender voice clinic; (b) key characteristics of the LGBTQ community that are pertinent to clinical practice.
Perspectives, SIG 17, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
Blake and McLeod describe the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF’s) purpose, development, contents, and coding. This article discusses the framework used by speech-language-pathologists and audiologists in practice and research to investigate body structures/functions and restrictions these may place on an individual’s ability to participate in activities. McNeilly confirms the need for ICF to become an integral part of clinical preparation providing insight regarding functional clinical outcomes of individuals, maximizing habilitation and rehabilitation outcomes. Ma discusses how the ICF is used to support clinical research, practice and education in Hong Kong with the hope of more global efforts by researchers and clinicians. Papathanasiou describes the principles of the ICF framework, encouraging the early introduction to students, using a framework for course curriculum, clinical competencies, and interprofessional education. Enderby discusses how the ICF is used to develop an outcome measurement approach, Therapy Outcome Measure, with application in a research study.
Perspectives, SIG 17, Vol. 3, Part 1, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
The authors showcase five concepts of international service. Randazzo and Garcia discuss sustainable practices used in an international services model describing an interprofessional services delivery model for service provision in a resource-poor, rural Cambodia. Plumb and Willis examine students’ perceptions of study abroad between Auburn University, the United Kingdom, and Ireland. Campos, Skiados, and Flynn author a discussion of the status of male speech-language pathologists in international speech-language pathology associations, including a review of male recruitment efforts. de Diego-Lazaro authors a description of measuring cultural competencies in speech and language pathology students, introducing the Cultural Awareness and Competence Scales, a new tool to assess cultural awareness. Harten, Franca, Boyer, and Pegoraro-Krook describe the international alliances developed to better equip students and professionals with skills for practicing in a changing world. Waterston, Duttine, Roman, and Caesar provide an update to The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association- Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (ASHA-PAHO/WHO) partnership with a description of the WHO Rehabilitation 2030 initiative in The ASHA-PAHO Partnership: Progress, Future Plans and connecting to WHO Rehabilitation 2030.
Services for Bilingual Children With Highly Unintelligible Speech
Format(s): Streaming Video
This video program provides comprehensive information about identifying, assessing, and treating bilingual children ages 3–11 who have highly unintelligible speech. The presenter discusses case studies and current research to provide concrete solutions to common challenges such as figuring out where to begin when providing services, identifying bilingual children at-risk for other concomitant deficiencies, differentiating language difference vs. disorder, and selecting the most effective treatments.
Perspectives, SIG 14, Vol. 3, Part 2, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These articles include two qualitative studies that provided insight into various aspects of services for culturally diverse and linguistic (CLD) populations. Topics include: (a) a qualitative study conducted by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Multicultural Issues Board designed to extract CLD clinicians’ beliefs on how their backgrounds affect their career choices and practice, as well as their suggestions on how to be most responsive to CLD clients; (b) a qualitative analysis of caregivers’ views on services they received for their CLD children during home-based treatment and; (c) a cross-disciplinary review of 40 years of literature on children who use African American English.
Best Seller
Identifying Developmental Language Disorder in Linguistically Diverse Schools
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Although clinicians have long understood the risks of misidentifying an English learner or nonmainstream dialect speaker with language impairment, research to date has lacked a more nuanced view of assessment within diverse populations. Specifically, practitioners need the knowledge and tools to diagnose “disorder within difference,” a concept that is introduced and then exemplified in this journal self-study course, based on a Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools clinical forum. The authors of the articles examine a variety of assessment and screening tools used with children of varying linguistic backgrounds, including speakers of rural southern dialects, speakers of African American English, and Spanish-English bilingual children.
Best Seller
Transgender Voice and Beyond: Voice and Communication Training for Gender Expression
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Voice modification services for transgender individuals or those with gender-diverse identities is an emerging area of practice for SLPs. While research-based methods for services exist, many SLPs are not sufficiently prepared to serve this population. This webinar will explain the cultural and clinical factors involved in gender-based voice and communication services and describe inclusive practices to support individuals with unique perspectives and concerns. The presenters will share research and clinical cases to illustrate best practice standards for assessment and intervention. Rationales for these standards are based on research regarding communication factors that influence gender attribution by others, factors that influence speakers’ own perception and satisfaction with their voice, and effects of treatment.
Assessment and Intervention for Speakers of Nonmainstream English Dialects
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Distinguishing between language disorder and language difference can be a challenge when a child speaks a nonmainstream English dialect. This journal self-study presents research findings that clinicians can implement with this population in their practice. Two of the articles examine modifications to scoring procedures to correct for dialect in assessments for language impairment. The third article explores the validity of a dialect-sensitive assessment tool. The final article examines the effects of a curriculum designed to teach dialectal differences. In total, the assessment and intervention strategies and tools discussed in these articles will allow SLPs to deliver more effective services and promote academic success for children who speak nonmainstream English dialects.
Phonological Intervention With Bilingual Children: The Complexity Approach
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This webinar will explore evidence-based methods for treating bilingual children with speech sound disorders. Participants will learn the fundamentals of typological complexity theory, discuss past treatment research in this domain, compare and contrast the complexity approach with developmental approaches to treatment, learn target goal selection, and discuss case studies related to these concepts.
Collaboration With Interpreters: Securing Positive Outcomes
Format(s): Streaming Video
Collaborating with interpreters is often an important step when working with individuals who speak a language other than English. Although bilingual SLPs and audiologists may be familiar with an individual’s native language, a skilled interpreter may be helpful to assist during the evaluation process. There is almost no research on collaborating with interpreters in audiology and speech-language pathology, and most professionals have not been adequately trained to collaborate with an interpreter. In this session, Henriette Langdon offers SLPs and audiologists helpful, evidence-based strategies for working with interpreters, based on research that has been conducted in other fields, including medicine and law, as well as across disciplines at international conferences. You will walk away with practical strategies to ensure that your time with clients who require interpreters is used effectively.
Practical Assessment and Treatment Strategies for English Language Learners With Language Impairments
Format(s): Streaming Video
Many SLPs face the challenge of assessing and evaluating English language learners (ELLs) whose primary language they do not know in order to ascertain whether students are manifesting a language difference or a language impairment. There are no formal tests to administer to ELLs who speak a language such as Vietnamese, Tagalog, or Russian, but SLPs must find a way to evaluate the student in a legal, nonbiased manner. In this session, Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin provides practical tools that SLPs can use with ELLs ages 3-18 from any language background. The course also touches on intervention, specifically language of intervention and practical strategies for increasing the vocabulary skills of ELLs with language impairments.
Serving Clients From Diverse Backgrounds: Speech-Language Difference vs. Disorder
Format(s): Streaming Video
Currently, more than a fifth of school-age children speak a language other than English at home, and the population of English language learners will continue to grow. SLPs need to conduct assessments that will determine whether speech-language production errors are indicative of a disorder or the result of the normal process of second language acquisition. We must then provide treatment that supports the needs of diverse learners. This course will provide an easy-to-use framework to distinguish speech-language disorders from speech-language differences as well as introduce practical interventions SLPs can use immediately to support English language learners.
Professional Diversity: How Your Unique Perspective Can Improve Clinical Decision-Making
Format(s): Streaming Video
What are your proudest professional accomplishments? Which clients have you affected most significantly? What distinguishing personal characteristics allow you to make a difference for your clients? Each of us has a unique clinical perspective – informed by our individual background – that can be the critical factor in solving client needs. When we collaborate with colleagues and other professionals, we use diverse perspectives to ensure the best outcomes. The more diversity of backgrounds we have within the professions, the abler we are to serve an increasingly diverse population – and the better our collective clinical decision-making can be. This course will address how the diverse backgrounds and perspectives of SLPs and audiologists can enhance problem-solving and service provision. The course will also discuss the value of ongoing self-assessment and continuous expansion of our own diversity and cultural knowledge.

You have added this item to your cart.