CE Courses / Speech and Voice Disorders

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Clinical Practices for Aphasia
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These SIG 2 articles focus on clinical assessment and practices for individuals with aphasia. Topics covered included challenges associated with diagnosing primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and the impact of adaptive yoga programs for persons with aphasia. First, Aimee Dietz, E. Susan Duncan, Lauren Bislick, Sarah Stegman, Jenna Collins, Chitrali Mamlekar, Rachel Gleason, and Michael J. McCarthy provide an overview of the potential impact adapted yoga programs can have for people with stroke-induced aphasia. Second, Adithya Chandregowda raises awareness about the challenges associated with encountering primary progressive aphasia (PPA) patients in the acute hospital setting.
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Diagnostic Measures for Velopharyngeal Function
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This Perspectives activity highlights two articles with objective measures for both evaluation and treatment of velopharyngeal dysfunction. The first article discusses the palatal closure efficiency (PaCE) index. This is an aerodynamic tool used to estimate the velopharyngeal opening during certain speech contexts. This is done by measuring a percentage of change between nasal and oral cognates of an individual. The second article describes the nasometer in depth, highlighting its use as an evaluation and treatment tool for decreasing hypernasality. It goes into further detail on the differences between hypernasality and measured nasalance, highlighting both strengths and limitations of the nasalance score.
Quality of Life in Communication Among the Elderly
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
Three articles have been grouped, all centering around quality of life: at end of life, following a stroke, and among individuals with voice disorders. In “Facilitating End-of-Life Interaction Between Patients With Severe Communication Impairment and Their Families,” the authors acknowledge the work that has been done previously and recently in outlining the role of the speech-language pathologist in dysphagia and communication at end of life. One case study is presented, which describes an end-of-life scenario following a stroke. Post–case study review, the authors include reflections, counseling points for clinicians related to the case study, and counseling points in the form of a handout that could be used as a resource for clinicians. Given that existing research on the impacts of stroke is primarily conducted within a 5-year period following the stroke, the authors of “Quality of Life Following Stroke: A Qualitative Study Across 30 Years” seek to understand the long-term effects. They draw data from 28 years of journals that were kept by the participant and conduct semistructured family interviews. The authors draw four themes from the data—family support, faith, personality, and journaling—as having influence over the participant’s long-term experience poststroke. Within the discussion, the authors examine the World Health Organization’s Quality of Life Factors and the participant’s experience through the lens of the resilience theory. Among aging individuals, voice disorders (including presbyphonia) are commonly reported—however, treated less proportionately. “Perceived Voice Disorders in Older Adults and Impact on Social Interactions” uses a cross-sectional investigation approach by examining the findings of three assessments on 332 community dwelling individuals aged 60 and older. The authors conclude that voice disorders increase with age and, conversely, social interactions requiring communication decrease among individuals with voice disorders. As a result, health-care professionals are encouraged to educate older individuals on how and why to seek management of a voice disorder by a speech-language pathologist or qualified medical professional.
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Treating R Errors: Evidence-Based Cueing and Practice Strategies (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Persisting /r/ distortions are common speech sound errors for many children and adolescents. This on demand webinar describes /r/ intervention approaches that are rooted in sound science about the phonetics of /r/, basic principles of speech motor control, and evidence-based solutions.
Education, Considerations, and Techniques in Gender Affirming Voice Care
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
In this series of articles, the need for clear guidelines in graduate education on the topic of transgender voice and communication is explored through an e-survey. Considerations for culturally competent voice care is presented in the context of two case studies. Case studies are also used to highlight the importance of an interdisciplinary gender affirming approach for successful voice care with adolescence. In the final article, a voice technique is adapted for voice masculinization.
Speech Science Views and News
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This activity presents a diverse perspective, including four different speech science articles focused on a variety of topics. Kimball and Sayce discuss the pros and cons of research using behavior and functional assessment and treatment in the areas of speech science and voice, specifically their limitation in outlining etiology or explaining treatment resistance. They also provide an overview of genetic research approaches as a possible path forward to develop additional evidence-based treatment approaches. Neel reviews the production and perception of extralinguistic information regarding sex/gender, sexual orientation, age, non-native accent, regional and social dialect, and race and ethnicity. The article explores the literature in the above areas reviewing acoustical features and common misperceptions, concluding with instructional activities to enhance student awareness of indexical characteristics. McAllister et al. studied the effects of biofeedback for residual rhotic errors in a preliminary case series. Participants were five native English speakers who had not yet generalized rhotic production. Treatment consisted of either electropalatographic or visual-acoustic biofeedback using the Challenge Point Program software. Although participant responses to treatment were variable, the median effect size tended to exceed the minimum value considered clinically significant. Gritsyk et al. examined three measures to determine which best predicted change in production accuracy during a vowel learning task. Using 20 female college students, researchers administered three tasks: an oral stereognosis task, a bite block task using auditory making, and a new phonetic awareness task. The bite block task with auditory masking, measuring proprioceptive awareness, was the only task significantly related to performance in speech learning.
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Practical Solutions for SLPs Working With Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Students who are deaf or hard of hearing are a diverse population of individuals who may use various languages, communication modalities, and technologies. Often, SLPs do not have in-depth training to confidently work with these students. In this on demand webinar, an SLP and an audiologist share practical approaches, tools, and resources that SLPs can use to determine how to best meet the needs of students who are deaf or hard of hearing and support them in the school environment.
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From Echolalia to Self-Generated Language: Case Studies in Natural Language Acquisition (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar focuses on case examples that demonstrate a language-based approach to managing echolalia, from delayed echolalia to self-generated language. Using video clips and language sample excerpts, the speakers describe the stages of gestalt language development, illustrate the varieties of echolalia, and review case examples of the successful use of the Natural Language Acquisition (NLA) protocol to support gestalt language development in three individuals. The speakers also propose transparent terminology that can be used to help explain NLA to colleagues and families.
Structural Anomalies Related to Cleft and Craniofacial Conditions
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 5) articles focus on the functional problems caused by the structural anomalies of the craniofacial complex and pathways for intervention. Articles describes the impact of submucous cleft palate, dental/skeletal anomalies, and distraction osteogenesis on speech and resonance outcomes for individuals with craniofacial anomalies. Multidisciplinary roles and best practice recommendations are also provided.
Diagnosis and Treatment of Exercise-Induced Laryngeal Obstruction (EILO) (SIG 3)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This course addresses assessment standards for confident diagnosis of exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) for clinicians across settings. Speakers discuss differential diagnoses and complex, co-occurring conditions as well as provide an update on terminology used to describe variants of what used to be commonly known as paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM). The speakers use case examples and research summaries to discuss current, evidence-based, behavioral methods for remediation and resolution of these conditions. This course – part of the SIGnature Series – was developed by SIG 3: Voice and Upper Airway Disorders.
Evaluation and Treatment of Velopharyngeal Dysfunction During the Pandemic (SIG 5) (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar will explore service delivery modifications as well as evaluation and treatment principles for velopharyngeal dysfunction in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic. Speakers will address service delivery considerations during the pandemic for individuals with cleft palate and associated craniofacial or velopharyngeal conditions who may experience resonance, speech sound production, voice, feeding and swallowing, dental and orthodontic, hearing, and psychosocial difficulties. This webinar – part of the SIGnature Series – was developed by SIG 5: Craniofacial and Velopharyngeal Disorders.
Interpreting Videostroboscopy: Fundamentals and Clinical Application (SIG 3) (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This on demand webinar will explore the use of videostroboscopy and videoendoscopy to inform assessment and management of voice disorders (e.g., identification of physical factors, vocal technique factors, hygiene issues, stimulability testing, etc.). The speakers will describe stroboscopic technique, including scientific underpinnings and limitations, as well as discuss rating forms/scales, assessment protocols, and practice ratings to support clinicians’ decision-making regarding videostroboscopy. The webinar will also include a practice activity. This webinar – part of the SIGnatureSeries – was developed by SIG 3: Voice and Upper Airway Disorders.
Should We Treat Cleft Palate Speech Errors With Oral Motor Exercises? (SIG 5)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This course explores the use of oral motor exercise in the treatment of children with resonance and/or compensatory speech errors. Speakers discuss theoretical, developmental, and other data sets, with a focus on how to apply critical thinking to treatment planning. Speakers present treatment examples as well as research and its clinical implications. This course – part of the SIGnature Series – was developed by SIG 5: Craniofacial and Velopharyngeal Disorders.
Treating Speech Sound Disorders: Considerations for Intervention Planning
Format(s): eWorkshop
Using case scenarios and speech samples, this session—a recorded session from ASHA’s 2020 Schools Connect conference—guides SLPs through designing an efficient, effective, and evidence-based treatment plan for a student with a speech sound disorder. The speaker translates nine concepts from current research into practical strategies for selecting treatment targets, selecting treatment approaches, eliciting more accurate productions, and improving automaticity and generalization.
Speech Perception and Production
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This Perspectives (SIG 19) includes four different speech science articles that focus on speech production, speech perception, or both. Akbari and Aoyama examine epenthetic vowels produced by Persian L2 speakers of English corroborating previous research findings regarding acoustical characteristics of anaptyctic epenthetic vowels—prothetic epenthetic vowels differ from the phonemic vowels they precede. Hitchcock et al. examine speech perception of typical adults, typical children, and children with speech sound disorders, finding that children with speech sound disorders differ as compared to both typical groups. Rong conducted a preliminary examination of the articulatory control of speech and speech-like tasks. The results revealed shared and task-specific articulatory features in speech and speech-like tasks, specifically sharing that alternating motion rate tasks may be more useful for assessing temporal aspects of articulation whereas sequential motion rate tasks may be more useful for assessing spatial aspects of articulation and coordination. Lastly, Boyd-Pratt and Donai review evidence that the high frequency region contains perceptual cues regarding segmental, speaker identity, and speaker sex as well as improved speech recognition in the presence of noise.
Ethical Considerations for Voice and Upper Airway Clinicians
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 3) articles address ethical considerations for voice and upper airway clinicians. Speech language pathologists are responsible to conduct clinical and business activities ethically, legally, and with a high level of integrity. Billing questions and reimbursement issues that often arise related to ever-changing insurance regulations and Medicare guidelines will be addressed. Additionally, factors that guide ethical decision-making to determine what comprises medically necessary voice therapy that involves or targets singing voice will be presented.
Considerations for Academic and Clinical  Training in Craniofacial Anomalies
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 5) articles focus on the status of academic and clinical training related to cleft and craniofacial conditions, a module training series for addressing the gaps in current educational roadmaps, and resources and best practice recommendations are provided.
Perception, Technology, and Clinical Applications
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 19) articles focus on perceptual considerations and the use of a system to investigate lingual coordination as a clinical tool. In the first article Rakerd et al. review the resonant effects of performers, resonance associated with nasality, and resonant voice for both normal and disordered populations. In the second article Grover et al. use the bubble noise method, which places noise randomly in time and frequency with “holes” or “bubbles” that give glimpses into the target signal, to determine what is perceptually important in the speech signal for native/first language listeners versus nonnative/second language listeners. In the final article, Dugan et al. review TonguePART, an image processing system used to track the tongue surface, as a reliable, fast method to track articulatory movement of the tongue for syllables
Voice and Laryngeal Manifestations of Autoimmune Diseases
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This Perspectives (SIG 3) article provides a thorough review of the literature regarding autoimmune disease and effects on voice and laryngeal function. To maximize patient outcomes, guidelines for differential diagnosis and referral patterns are highlighted.
Accessible, Low-Cost Methods for Voice Assessment
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session shares low-cost and accessible methods for voice measurement that clinicians in any work setting can use as part of a voice assessment for adults and children. These assessment methods address the impact of vocal issues on activities of daily living, allow individuals to report voice changes over time, and aid clinicians in developing treatment goals and measuring outcomes. This course is a recorded session from the 2020 online conference “Voice Evaluation and Treatment: Improving Outcomes for Children and Adults.”
Aging Voice: Assessment and Treatment Options
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session discusses presbyphonia—the anatomical, physiological, and overall functional changes to the vocal mechanism as patients age. The speaker presents assessment strategies, with and without advanced instrumental assessment, as well as treatment options. The speaker also discusses case studies to highlight treatment decision-making and interprofessional care for voice issues that accompany aging. This course is a recorded session from the 2020 online conference “Voice Evaluation and Treatment: Improving Outcomes for Children and Adults.”
Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice and Voice Disorders
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session summarizes sources of variability in auditory-perceptual voice assessments. The speaker discusses strategies to reduce sources of error and introduces methods that may be applied in future clinical practice and research. This course is a recorded session from the 2020 online conference “Voice Evaluation and Treatment: Improving Outcomes for Children and Adults.”
Enhancing Clinical Practice With Effective Stroboscopy Interpretation
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session describes how to evaluate stroboscopy results using a new visuoperceptual assessment tool—the Voice-Vibratory Assessment with Laryngeal Imaging (VALI) rating form. The speaker also discusses how to integrate the results from stroboscopy intro treatment planning and execution. This course is a recorded session from the 2020 online conference “Voice Evaluation and Treatment: Improving Outcomes for Children and Adults.”
Evidence-Based Treatments for Muscle Tension Dysphonia
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session discusses strategies for successfully managing muscle tension dysphonia in patients of all ages and across practice settings. This course is a recorded session from the 2020 online conference “Voice Evaluation and Treatment: Improving Outcomes for Children and Adults.”
Including Vocal Hygiene Recommendations in Treatment Planning
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session highlights up-to-date, evidence-based vocal hygiene recommendations that can produce desired clinical outcomes without causing undue burden on patients. This course is a recorded session from the 2020 online conference “Voice Evaluation and Treatment: Improving Outcomes for Children and Adults.”
Overcoming Treatment Compliance Challenges in Voice Treatment
Format(s): eWorkshop
Ensuring carryover and compliance outside of voice therapy sessions is one of the most difficult aspects of intervention for voice disorders. This session discusses the latest research, technology, and strategies that can help improve carryover and compliance. This course is a recorded session from the 2020 online conference “Voice Evaluation and Treatment: Improving Outcomes for Children and Adults.”
Special Considerations for Performers
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session examines best practices for working with performing artists, a special population that on the one hand has unique stressors and needs but on the other hand shares many issues and concerns with the broader community of patients with voice disorders. The speaker discusses how clinicians can ensure that the therapeutic process is effective and relevant for vocal performing artists. This course is a recorded session from the 2020 online conference “Voice Evaluation and Treatment: Improving Outcomes for Children and Adults.”
Voice and Communication Modification for People Who Identify Along the Gender Spectrum
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session explores working with people along the gender spectrum to attain their desired voice and communication goals. The speaker addresses cultural humility; methods of intake and assessment; training of vocal, verbal, and nonverbal parameters; and assessing readiness for exit from voice and communication modification. This course is a recorded session from the 2020 online conference “Voice Evaluation and Treatment: Improving Outcomes for Children and Adults.”
Instrumental Voice Assessment
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session presents key aspects of the ASHA-recommended standard protocols published in 2018 for endoscopic, acoustic, and aerodynamic assessment of voice. The protocols include specifications for instrumentation, environmental conditions, voice/speech tasks, analysis methods, and target measures. They facilitate comparisons across clinical settings and research studies to improve the evidence base in the area of voice. This course is a recorded session from the 2020 online conference “Voice Evaluation and Treatment: Improving Outcomes for Children and Adults.”
Pediatric Voice Assessment
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session focuses on the assessment of pediatric voice disorders, including techniques for successful laryngeal visualization with children, differential diagnosis of vocal pathologies in the pediatric population, acoustic/aerodynamic measures of vocal function, and implementing a multidisciplinary approach for evaluation and treatment. This course is a recorded session from the 2020 online conference “Voice Evaluation and Treatment: Improving Outcomes for Children and Adults.”
Treatment of Pediatric Voice Disorders
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session presents an approach to voice treatment and training for children that uses age-adapted play and emphasizes vocal function as opposed to conservation. The speakers discuss the science and data behind the approach, as well as practical issues and strategies for clinical service delivery. This course is a recorded session from the 2020 online conference “Voice Evaluation and Treatment: Improving Outcomes for Children and Adults.”
Writing Present Level of Performance and Treatment Plans: Analyzing Speech Sound Error Patterns in Children With Speech Sound Disorders
Format(s): eWorkshop
Analyzing error patterns in data obtained from production of single words and/or connected speech can be an important step in planning and implementing effective speech sound intervention. This session reviews speech sound error patterns and discusses when error pattern analysis is indicated for preschool and school-age children. The speaker discusses case examples and presents procedures for analyzing speech sound data for error patterns (e.g., frequency, phoneme involved), writing IEP present level of performance based on error pattern analysis, and planning intervention using error pattern data. This course is a recorded session from the 2019/2020 online conference “Innovative Methods for Preschool Assessment, Collaboration, and Treatment.”
Use of Technology to Assess  Speech Production and Voice
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 19) articles provide with information relevant to speech science research and education. Lulich and Pearson present two demonstrations in this technical report to illustrate the utility of 3D/4D ultrasound technology. First, the authors report that “not only can structures be imaged which previously were impossible to identify from 2D ultrasound alone (e.g., piriform sinuses and posterior pharyngeal wall), but questions involving non-sagittal structures and asymmetrical tongue shapes, such as the pervasiveness and extensiveness of lateral contact between the tongue and the palate-teeth, can now be addressed non-invasively.” Second, they also conclude that “the fusion of ultrasound data with MRI images further enhances the utility of 3D/4D ultrasound, since it combines the strengths of ultrasound with the complementary strengths of the other modality, while mitigating the weaknesses of each.” Richardson et al., compare various acoustical measures of sustained vowels obtained using the Multidimensional Voice Program (MDVP) by Computerized Speech Lab, Praat, and TF32. Results show that the MDVP yield significantly higher values of standard deviation of fundamental frequency, jitter, and shimmer, and significantly lower values of noise-to-harmonics ratio compared to the other programs. They discuss the variation of numerical values across programs and the resulting clinical implications. Hagedorn et al. discuss the benefits of a collaboration among engineers, speech scientists, and clinicians which yield “the development of biologically inspired technology that has been proven useful for both small- and large-scale analysis,” a better understanding of speech production, and the development of assessment tools with a clinical benefit and interdisciplinary reach. They also review the use of real-time magnetic resonance imaging across clinical populations and discuss the challenges associated with collaborative work. Lee and Fischer reveal an association between acoustic vowel space and the severity of dysarthria. They review sex differences, factors that may affect formant-related measures, and clinical implications.
Refining Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Apraxia of Speech
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study updates clinicians on advances in the field that can refine current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Two articles address assessment: One examines how type of stimuli can affect differential diagnosis of CAS, and the other identifies possible red flags in young children by examining characteristics of speech production in infants and toddlers who were later diagnosed with CAS. Two additional articles address advances in intervention for CAS: One looks at the efficacy of adding prosody as a treatment component, and the other explores a model-based treatment protocol.
Updates on Vocal Fold Paralysis SIG 3
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 3) articles provide a comprehensive update on evaluation and management of unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Multidisciplinary evaluations are addressed in addition to various medical and behavioral treatment options.
Speech, Surgical, and Psychosocial Considerations for 22Q Deletion Syndrome SIG 5
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 5) articles focus on 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and the associated communication, feeding/swallowing, psychosocial, and surgical factors associated with this condition.
Cleft Palate Speech: What Do I Hear? What Do I Do? (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Children with cleft palate often require speech intervention post-surgical repair to normalize their phonological learning of the high intraoral pressure consonants. In many cases, SLPs may find it challenging to differentiate between speech characteristics that are a result of persisting velopharyngeal insufficiency and those that are learned, habituated speech behaviors. This webinar addresses both structural and speech challenges that can co-exist in children with repaired cleft palate so that SLPs in all clinical settings can help these children achieve their best outcomes for speech production.
A Language-Based Approach to Managing Echolalia (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
This webinar will discuss all aspects of echolalia, a complex and often misunderstood language phenomenon. The speaker will discuss the origins of echolalia and review the evidence that supports it as a positive indicator of language development. The speaker will describe how to perform ongoing assessment before and during mitigation, and share intervention strategies to facilitate the transition to self-generated language.
Clinical and Research Topics in Voice SIG 3
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 3) articles provide learners with diverse information including valuable insight on considerations for the role of the speech-language pathologist in working with trans youth, keys to build a successful telepractice, and a review of the electrolarynx (past and present).
Stuttering: Addressing Child and Parent Attitudes and Behaviors
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Stuttering can have a negative effect on a child’s self-esteem and self-confidence. It also affects parents, who may not understand how to support their child. This journal self-study contains a selection of articles from the October 2018 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology special issue based on sessions and posters from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference. The conference, held every 3 years, seeks to integrate research and clinical practice in fluency disorders. Clinicians will be able to use the specific techniques and activities described in these articles to help parents and children approach stuttering differently and improve outcomes.
Perspectives, SIG 1, Vol. 3, Part 4, 2018
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
The articles focus on language intervention progress monitoring for elementary students and for adolescents specifically while producing narratives and while learning morphologically complex words. The authors also address the psychometric requirements of oral and written language progress monitoring assessments. Research and theory are tied to practical clinical application with specific examples.
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Selecting Complex Intervention Targets for Children With Phonological Disorders (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Children with phonological disorders make up a large portion of the caseload for school-based SLPs who work with students ages 3–7. But SLPs rarely use the complexity approach in treating these children due to a lack of familiarity with the approach, despite the evidence to support its use. This webinar walks clinicians step-by-step through how to apply the complexity approach so they can feel confident in this addition to their clinical toolbox. Presenter Holly Storkel uses case studies to illustrate how to select complex treatment targets.
Improving Speech Skills Using Curriculum Content
Format(s): Streaming Video
Clinicians frequently find that children with speech sound disorders progress in intervention more slowly than desired, or they may make expected progress within sessions but not carry over or generalize improved speech skills to their daily activities. There is some evidence that using normalized speech sound intervention – treatment activities that reflect the real-world activities and interactions in which children communicate – can lead to more rapid increases in intelligibility. This course will provide participants with the knowledge and skills to implement normalized speech sound intervention using age and developmentally appropriate curriculum-based learning activities in which the production of speech sound targets is integrated in meaningful verbal and social interactions.
Assessment and Treatment of Age-Related Voice Disorders (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Voice disorders are a prevalent and persistent problem in older adults. As the number of people over age 65 continues to increase, SLPs likely will see a growing demand for their services to treat age-related communication problems, including disorders related to the “aging voice.” This webinar will explore the typical age-related changes in each of the three major subsystems involved with voice production (respiratory, laryngeal, and resonatory) and explain how these changes affect vocal quality and ability. The presenters also will discuss appropriate assessment and intervention options, providing an overview of medical, surgical, and behavioral treatments.
Advancements in Pediatric Single-Word Speech Assessment
Format(s): Journal (Online)
As caseloads grow and diversify, clinicians may question whether they are equipped with the necessary tools to address changing demands when it comes to working with children with speech sound disorders. The single-word naming task is a basic component of pediatric speech production assessment, but is there an adequate evidence base behind the use of single-word naming tools for all populations served? Are the items found in these assessments necessary and sufficient to diagnose speech sound disorders? The four articles in this journal self-study address such questions.
Remediating Rhotic Distortions: Moving Beyond Traditional Approaches
Format(s): Journal (Online)
School-based clinicians generally agree that /r/ is one of the most challenging speech sounds to remediate. Despite research showing how persistent rhotic distortions can affect students’ social, academic, and even future employment prospects, some children are discharged from services because traditional approaches simply fail to work. This journal self-study offers a response to the frustration often experienced by clinicians and clients struggling with persistent errors by showcasing some exciting new methods in /r/ intervention. Three articles describe promising results of different types of biofeedback-visual-acoustic, ultrasound, and electropalatographic interventions that are gradually becoming more accessible to clinicians. These articles also explore how biofeedback methods and other intervention modifications can adapt the principles of motor learning to increase efficacy of articulation intervention. The fourth article is an exploration of self-entrainment theory to promote speech sound change through the use of hand gestures.
Assessing School-Age Children With Speech-Sound Disorders (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
SLPs often assess school-age children for speech-sound disorders using a single, standardized test. However, this "one-size-fits-all" approach can yield results that do not account for the impact of speech-sound disorders on other aspects of academic performance. This webinar will describe steps to help SLPs develop clear rationales and clinical decision-making strategies to assess speech-sound skill areas more effectively and facilitate intervention planning.
Early, Persistent, and Remediated Speech Sound Disorders: There Is More to the Story (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
Do you wonder why you have children on your caseload who have had the same speech sound production errors for years? Do you wonder what you can do to help the 5th grader who continues to have trouble with the /r/ sound? Do you wonder what happens to these children after they are off your caseload? This webinar will discuss these and other questions that the presenter herself had as a practicing school-based SLP and that she now attempts to solve as a researcher. In this webinar, she will explore the factors that influence language, literacy, and cognitive skills for children with early, persistent, and remediated speech sound disorders. Discussion will include how SLPs can help these children more quickly as well as assessment considerations for ensuring the best outcomes from intervention.
Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention for Cleft Lip and Palate
Format(s): Journal (Online)
The articles included in this journal self-study include evidence-based assessment and intervention practices for children with cleft lip and/or palate, a specialized population with which many SLPs have limited experience. The first article describes a clinical measure for quantifying nasal air emission using a nasal accelerometer. The second article illustrates the developmental timeline of typical velopharyngeal function in speech production and then compares it to what is seen in toddlers with repaired cleft. The third article offers treatment efficacy data for a naturalistic intervention with phonological emphasis for toddlers with cleft lip and/or palate. The final article examines a number of factors that can influence language development in internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate.
Social and Vocational Impacts of Voice Disorders
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study explores a variety of issues related to adult vocal health and how voice disorders affect social and work-related interactions. Articles examine prevalence rates of voice disorders among college students; self-reports of vocal use; issues that school workers confront that may affect vocal health; the impact of common workplace issues, such as heating and air conditioning levels, on vocal functioning; and how voice disorders may affect listener processing and comprehension.
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Speech Sound Disorders in Preschool and School-Age Children
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Children with speech sound disorders make up a large part of the caseload for many SLPs who work with preschool and school-age children. Speech sound disorders not only affect a child’s ability to communicate at a young age but also may lead to later speech and literacy difficulties. This journal self-study explores issues related to managing speech sound disorders, including assessment and treatment options. It also includes articles that identify predictors of future speech and literacy problems. Clinicians can use this information to help identify appropriate assessment tools and potential treatment options, as well as counsel parents and teachers of children who may be at risk for continuing speech and academic difficulties.
Beyond Cleft Palate: Differential Diagnosis and Treatment of Velopharyngeal Dysfunction
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
A history of cleft palate is the most common cause of velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD), but there are many other causes, including other structural anomalies of the velopharyngeal valve, neurophysiological disorders that result in inadequate velopharyngeal movement, and even faulty placement of the articulators due to mislearning. Differential diagnosis of the cause of these VPD speech characteristics and the contributing factors is essential to determine appropriate treatment, whether it be velopharyngeal surgery, a prosthetic device, and/or intervention with an SLP. In this webinar, the presenter will show videos and discuss various causes of abnormal resonance and nasal emission due to non-cleft velopharyngeal dysfunction. The presenter will also discuss a variety of treatment options that are appropriate for various causes of VPD.
Discriminating Childhood Apraxia of Speech From Speech Delay
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Since the first description of a childhood speech disorder similar in presentation to adult onset apraxia of speech, much research has gone into identifying characteristics to help make diagnosis more accurate and reduce the known over-identification of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). However, to date, there has been no conclusive diagnostic marker identified to differentiate CAS from other speech delays. The goal of the articles in this self-study is “to develop and validate a diagnostic marker that discriminates early and persistent CAS from speech delay.” The articles introduce the pause marker (PM) and discuss support for the PM as well as possible clinical and research uses with the development of an assessment tool, the Pause Marker Index (PMI). While the PMI is not yet ready for clinical application, the articles provide clinicians with information about the PM that they can begin to incorporate into assessment and treatment to better serve their clients.
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Treating Childhood and Adolescent Voice Disorders
Format(s): Streaming Video
Childhood and adolescent voice disorders are observed in multiple clinical settings, with many professionals having limited background or education to properly treat them. Pediatric voice disorders can have adverse effects on children and teens in classroom and social situations. This video course provides a plethora of practical information based on research and practice in a major pediatric hospital setting. Vocal hygiene, vocal function exercises, semi-occluded vocal tract exercises, and other specific techniques are discussed.
Aspects of Speech Sound Disorders
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes five recorded sessions from the 2016 online conference “Improving Intelligibility in Children With Speech Sound Disorders.” These sessions provide SLPs with new strategies to promptly treat children with unintelligible speech and describe a range of evidence-based treatment techniques to get to the heart of speech sound disorders quickly. Practitioners will be able to confidently make decisions about treatment planning, implementation, and modification.
Speech Sound Disorders in Schools
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes four recorded sessions from the 2016 online conference “Improving Intelligibility in Children With Speech Sound Disorders.” These sessions focus on treating speech sound disorders in public schools, providing intervention in an MTSS framework, developing curriculum-based speech sound intervention, and innovative approaches to service delivery.
Speech Sound Disorders in Special Populations
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes three recorded sessions from the 2016 online conference “Improving Intelligibility in Children With Speech Sound Disorders.” These sessions focus on speech sound interventions for special populations, including children with cochlear implants, autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, Down Syndrome, and bilingual children.
Speech Sound Disorders: Impact on Language and Literacy
Format(s): eWorkshop
This course includes two recorded sessions from the 2016 online conference “Improving Intelligibility in Children With Speech Sound Disorders.” These sessions focus on the role of phonological representations, vocabulary, and working memory in assessment of children with speech sound disorders, as well as the importance of evidence-based phonological awareness intervention to enhance literacy success.
Treatment for Acquired Apraxia of Speech: Understanding the Evidence
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) is a motor speech disorder caused by brain damage, such as from a stroke, and can range from only slight difficulty saying sounds and words to a complete inability to produce sound. Speech-language pathologists working with people with AOS often struggle to determine which treatments will work best to help those with this frustrating disorder. This journal self-study explores the research behind AOS treatment through an updated systematic review of the literature on AOS and exploration of outcomes of treatment for AOS that has been described in single-subject research. In addition, a discussion of a treatment using auditory masking is included, which builds upon and adds to the research on speech motor control. Clinicians will be able to apply the information in these articles to the treatment they provide and add to their arsenal of evidence-based treatment tools with confidence.
Elements of a Comprehensive Voice Evaluation (On Demand Webinar)
Format(s): On Demand Webinar
A comprehensive voice evaluation to create a complete profile of an individual’s voice capabilities and limitations requires both instrumental and non-instrumental methods. But many speech-language pathologists do not have access to the sophisticated equipment used to conduct voice evaluations in large, national voice centers. This webinar presents the objectives and a recommended methodology for completing a comprehensive voice evaluation with and without instrumental procedures. The speaker offers guidance to SLPs across work settings on approaches for achieving a comprehensive voice evaluation, making the most of your available resources.
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Evaluating and Enhancing Children’s Phonological Skills: A Systematic Approach
Format(s): Streaming Video
This video program examines how SLPs can better manage children with highly unintelligible speech who are making very slow progress. The presentation provides a framework – the evidence-based cycles phonological pattern remediation approach – for evaluating and enhancing optimal phonological patterns.
Concepts in Voice Therapy
Format(s): Journal (Online)
This journal self-study addresses issues in voice therapy, starting with an attempt to develop a classification system that captures all of the nuances of voice treatment so that researchers, clinicians, and others involved in treating voice issues can describe what occurs during treatment and identify how those components influence treatment outcomes. Additional articles contribute to the knowledge base of voice treatment by addressing the efficacy of long-used techniques such as phonation through thin tubes and straws, determining the state of the evidence for a specific voice disorder—paradoxical vocal fold motion, studying ways to improve adherence to voice treatment, and exploring the use of mobile biofeedback for learning and carryover. Clinicians treating individuals with voice disorders will benefit from this research that provides insight into the effectiveness of what they do and encourages new ways of thinking about and approaching treatment.
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Treating Dysarthria in Adults
Format(s): eWorkshop
Using videos and case studies, this session demonstrates how to identify, assess, and document appropriate treatment goals, strategies, and outcomes for adults with dysarthria. The session uses the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health classification system to evaluate clinical treatment approaches—including motor learning concepts—that address impairments of function, communication activity, and participation.
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Assessing Dysarthria in Adults
Format(s): eWorkshop
Using videos and case studies, this session explores clinical methods for using physical and behavioral observations to evaluate adults for dysarthria. Accurate differential diagnosis of dysarthria can help clinicians diagnose neurological conditions and aid speech-language pathologists and patients in managing these conditions.

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