CE Courses / Vestibular

List View
Grid View
5 Products

Vestibular and Balance Rehabilitation
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
For people experiencing dizziness, what are possible options for vestibular and balance rehabilitation? This self-study from Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups (SIG 7) addresses treatment choices in vestibular and balance rehabilitation, the state of the evidence on their efficacy, and future directions for interdisciplinary research and practice. Written by clinicians and scholars with expertise in audiology and physical therapy, the four articles present an interdisciplinary and life span approach to vestibular and balance rehabilitation for children and adults. The first article by Christy is on the use of vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy for dizziness in children. Next, the review by Herdman focuses on the evolution of vestibular function tests and rehabilitation for major vestibular disorders as well as areas in which research and clinical practice may grow in the future. In Holmberg, the relatively new but common diagnosis of persistent postural-perceptual dizziness (PPPD) is presented in terms of its pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment protocols. Finally, Clendaniel provides a review on the use of vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Included are detailed photos and illustrations of current techniques and exercises. As described in the introduction to the forum by Guest Editor Neil Shepard, PhD, “It is hoped that these four articles will provide a needed look at vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy (VBRT) so the audiologist can serve as a productive member of the treatment team and have a good understanding as to everything that
Clinical Applications of Vestibular Scientific Advancements in Specialized Populations
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 6) articles describe current research, diagnostic, and management techniques for three different vestibular populations, including individuals with Usher Syndrome, Meniere’s Disease, and aging populations. The first article examines age-related changes in vestibular function and discusses findings in animal studies examining specific structural and functional changes occurring within the system. The second article is a review designed to advance understanding of the clinical presentation of individuals with Usher Syndrome and discuss the importance of a multi-disciplinary team in diagnosis and management. Additionally, the latest research in gene-therapy treatments for Usher Syndrome are discussed. The final article is a large scale retrospective study of patients with an active Meniere’s Disease diagnosis. The study examines correlations between disease duration and diagnostic assessment findings.
An Interdisciplinary Perspective on Management of Patients With Dizziness & Balance Disorders
Format(s): eWorkshop
This session provides an interdisciplinary (audiology, otology, and physical therapy) perspective on management of patients with dizziness, specifically geared toward cutting-edge management techniques and recommendations for care. The panel presentation discusses surgical and nonsurgical approaches and clinical cases to highlight patient benefits and improved clinical outcomes. A question-and-answer period concludes the presentation. This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention. The session was developed by, and presenters invited by, Hearing, Vestibular, Tinnitus - Assessment and Intervention: Adult.
Meniere’s Disease in Childhood: A Case Study
Format(s): eWorkshop
Meniere’s disease (MD) rarely occurs in children. Due to this, care and treatment by knowledgeable clinicians and physicians are lacking. This presentation reviews a case of a 10-year-old male with diagnosed MD, the interdisciplinary approach for care and treatment, the cross-facility approach for obtaining best results, and follow-up hearing aid fitting suggestions for the affected ear. This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention.
Pediatric Vestibular Loss: The Effect of Vestibular Loss on Visual Acuity
Format(s): eWorkshop
Vestibular loss can co-occur with hearing loss. One functional effect of vestibular loss is decreased dynamic visual acuity. There is some speculation that vestibular loss can also affect reading and/or reading acuity. This presentation outlines the relationship between vestibular loss and both dynamic and static visual acuity and its possible effect on reading and other daily activities. This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention. The session was developed by, and presenters invited by, Hearing, Tinnitus, and Vestibular Science.

You have added this item to your cart.