Back To School

List View
Grid View
23 Products

ASHA White Oxford Blouse
Size(s): Small, Medium, Large, X-Large, XX-Large
Power up your power suit – or jeans, or skirt, or whatever – with this classic oxford! Dress up whatever you’re wearing and show your ASHA pride with the ASHA logo printed on the chest of this crisp, white button down oxford.


ASHA Black Long Sleeve Shirt
Size(s): Small, Medium, Large, X-Large, XX-Large
Cozy up in ASHA style with this sleek, long-sleeve, unisex tee. The ASHA logo is stitched in dark gray on the chest, making this great for Auds and SLPs. Perfect for cool weather or a day in a cool office or school, or when you’re lounging at home.


Language of Love Gray Long Sleeve Tunic
Size(s): Small, Medium, Large, X-Large, XX-Large
You’ll find stylish comfort in this soft, long sleeve tunic shirt! Perfect for sharing the positive message “Speak the Language of Love” while you shop, workout, meet with friends, or rock at work on casual Friday.


ASHA Black Dolman Sleeve Sweatshirt
Size(s): Small, Medium, Large, X-Large, XX-Large
Cozy up with a good book, or throw this on as a chic, warm layer while you’re out and about.


Best Seller
ASHA Funnel Neck Sweatshirt
Size(s): Small, Medium, Large, X-Large
Don’t let the cold get the best of you in this trendy cowl neck sweatshirt! This cozy sweatshirt is designed for comfort and style.


Men’s Gray ASHA Polo Shirt
Size(s): Small, Medium, Large, X-Large
This professional yet comfortable polo was so popular that we brought in another color. With an anti-curl collar, anti-wrinkling, and anti-shrinking technology, this ASHA logo embroidered shirt lets you head off to work in style.


Love Audiologists Red T-shirt
Size(s): Small, Medium, Large, X-Large, XX-Large
This flowy, red t-shirt has a sweet, love-focused graphic that reads “All You Need Is Love and Audiologists.”


Love SLPs Red T-shirt
Size(s): Small, Medium, Large, X-Large, XX-Large
A little bit of love is in everything you do, so why not wear it on your shirt? This flowy, red t-shirt has a sweet, love-focused graphic that reads “All You Need Is Love and SLPs.”


Exploring Curriculum-Based Language Assessment and Interventions
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Spoken and written language skills underlie all aspects of the school curriculum and are essential for school success. This journal self-study, which includes articles from a Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools clinical forum, addresses ways SLPs can assess and treat language disorders within the context of the school curriculum. The goal of the articles is, as noted in the introductory article, “to establish the school-based SLP as the language and literacy expert for curriculum-based interventions and assessment” (Bourque Meaux, 2018, p.138). The authors in the clinical forum discuss alternate service delivery options and tools for school-based SLPs to use and also explore how SLPs can mentor and educate other school professionals to better support language skills within the school curriculum.
The Role of Risk Factors in Assessment for Communication Disorders
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Clinicians are well-trained in collecting and reporting thorough family and medical case histories of their clients. This information, however, is most often used as a backdrop for direct assessment measures, which are the actual standards for determining eligibility for services. In recent years, the evidence base concerning risk factors for communication disorders has steadily increased. The four articles in this self-study not only demonstrate the significant value of case history information, but suggest that diagnostic standards in the future will weigh risk factors more heavily along with assessment scores.
Advancements in Pediatric Single-Word Speech Assessment
Format(s): Journal (Online)
As caseloads grow and diversify, clinicians may question whether they are equipped with the necessary tools to address changing demands when it comes to working with children with speech sound disorders. The single-word naming task is a basic component of pediatric speech production assessment, but is there an adequate evidence base behind the use of single-word naming tools for all populations served? Are the items found in these assessments necessary and sufficient to diagnose speech sound disorders? The four articles in this journal self-study address such questions.
Best Seller
Assessing and Treating Grammatical Deficits in Children and Young Adults
Format(s): Journal (Online)
English grammar develops in a fairly predictable sequence, and errors are common as children learn grammar rules. Children with language impairments often demonstrate continued difficulty with grammatical morphemes. This journal self-study explores issues related to grammar development, as well as factors to consider when assessing and treating grammar deficits. Clinicians can use this information to improve intervention and optimize grammar development in children with language disorders.
Remediating Rhotic Distortions: Moving Beyond Traditional Approaches
Format(s): Journal (Online)
School-based clinicians generally agree that /r/ is one of the most challenging speech sounds to remediate. Despite research showing how persistent rhotic distortions can affect students’ social, academic, and even future employment prospects, some children are discharged from services because traditional approaches simply fail to work. This journal self-study offers a response to the frustration often experienced by clinicians and clients struggling with persistent errors by showcasing some exciting new methods in /r/ intervention. Three articles describe promising results of different types of biofeedback-visual-acoustic, ultrasound, and electropalatographic interventions that are gradually becoming more accessible to clinicians. These articles also explore how biofeedback methods and other intervention modifications can adapt the principles of motor learning to increase efficacy of articulation intervention. The fourth article is an exploration of self-entrainment theory to promote speech sound change through the use of hand gestures.
Special Issues in Autism
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Clinicians who work with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are aware of the challenges presented by the varied abilities and behaviors of this group. This journal self-study focuses on special populations of children with ASD, including those who are deaf, those who use AAC, and bilingual children. A final article discusses how intervention can be extended beyond improving social skills to working toward establishing and maintaining actual friendships. SLPs working with children with ASD can use information from these articles to improve clinical practice when working with children with these particular special situations.
Improving Reading and Writing Outcomes in Young Children
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Literacy skills begin to develop in early childhood, and addressing deficits in reading and writing skills early may prevent later problems in school. This journal self-study explores special situations that may affect literacy skills, including the presence of speech sound disorders, hearing impairment, and cultural and/or socioeconomic differences. It also includes articles that discuss intervention techniques to improve phonological awareness, an important emergent literacy skill. Clinicians can use this information to improve reading and writing assessment and treatment techniques for preschool and early elementary school children.
Best Seller
Speech Sound Disorders in Preschool and School-Age Children
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Children with speech sound disorders make up a large part of the caseload for many SLPs who work with preschool and school-age children. Speech sound disorders not only affect a child’s ability to communicate at a young age but also may lead to later speech and literacy difficulties. This journal self-study explores issues related to managing speech sound disorders, including assessment and treatment options. It also includes articles that identify predictors of future speech and literacy problems. Clinicians can use this information to help identify appropriate assessment tools and potential treatment options, as well as counsel parents and teachers of children who may be at risk for continuing speech and academic difficulties.
Assessment and Intervention for Speakers of Nonmainstream English Dialects
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Distinguishing between language disorder and language difference can be a challenge when a child speaks a nonmainstream English dialect. This journal self-study presents research findings that clinicians can implement with this population in their practice. Two of the articles examine modifications to scoring procedures to correct for dialect in assessments for language impairment. The third article explores the validity of a dialect-sensitive assessment tool. The final article examines the effects of a curriculum designed to teach dialectal differences. In total, the assessment and intervention strategies and tools discussed in these articles will allow SLPs to deliver more effective services and promote academic success for children who speak nonmainstream English dialects.
Preschool Language Disorders: Identification and Outcomes Reporting
Format(s): Journal (Online)
A child’s early language development can be used to predict later language and literacy skills, as well as school readiness and academic success. It has long been a challenge to distinguish children who are “late talkers” and will eventually develop age-appropriate language skills from those who might have a language delay that requires intervention. This journal self-study primarily examines issues related to assessing language disorders in preschoolers, in an attempt to identify those children who may be at risk for language and learning difficulties and would benefit from support. Specifically, articles examine risk factors for being a late talker, alternative methods of screening for language impairment, and the usefulness of parent and teacher reports when screening bilingual children. One final article discusses collecting and reporting outcomes for preschool children with speech and language disorders. Clinicians can use this information to improve their approach to language screening and outcomes reporting for preschoolers on their caseload.
Improving Efficiency of Intervention for Children With Language Challenges
Format(s): Journal (Online)
A significant proportion of treatment research aims to determine whether particular interventions are effective in addressing children’s language deficits, but just as important are ways to increase efficiency of these interventions in practice. The articles in this journal self-study examine a range of variables that promote efficiency. The first article manipulates two parameters of dosage—rate and distribution of teaching episodes—and compares the effects on vocabulary learning in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder. The second article examines the dosage parameter of schedule (massed or distributed) on an intervention targeting grammatical morphemes in preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI). The third article examines adequate intensity for vocabulary acquisition for children with SLI during interactive book reading. A final article demonstrates how the addition of one training component in early educator professional development leads to greater efficiency in children’s responses to the same intervention presented in the third article.
Red ASHA Full-Zip Hoodie
Size(s): Small, Medium, Large
Stay warm while showing off your ASHA spirit in this red full-zip hoodie.


Men’s Blue ASHA Polo Shirt
Size(s): Small, Medium, Large
Dress professionally and comfortably at the same time with our new men’s polo! In Moonlight Blue, this polo has an anti-curl collar, anti-wrinkling, and anti-shrinking technology. With a light blue ASHA logo embroidered on the left chest, this shirt lets you head off to work in style.


Improving AAC for Children
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) often benefits children with severe disabilities. The most effective AAC systems consider the child’s individual needs and support learning and social interactions. This journal self-study explores ways to improve AAC systems to increase language skills, allow for more active participation in communication, and encourage emotional competence. Incorporating parent perceptions about AAC use into decision-making is also discussed, as are the benefits of peer involvement in communication using AAC. Clinicians will be able to incorporate strategies discussed to enhance services for children using AAC.
Best Seller
Improving Phonological Awareness Skills in Preschool Children
Format(s): Journal (Online)
Phonological awareness – the ability to identify and manipulate sounds in words – has been shown to predict a child’s later reading ability. But phonological awareness does not always develop naturally and thus requires instruction. However, many preschool teachers lack sufficient knowledge of phonological awareness and how to teach it. This journal self-study explores ways to improve phonological awareness instruction in preschools and provides suggestions on how SLPs can help teachers improve their phonological awareness knowledge. Clinicians will find practical tips for working directly with children with phonological awareness deficits and their families or with children enrolled in early education programs who need additional instruction to improve phonological awareness.

You have added this item to your cart.