Special Interest Group 16 - School-Based Issues

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Predictors of Caseload Size and Articulation Intervention
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This SIG 16 Perspectives activity includes research that focuses on caseload issues and articulation intervention. In the first article, Shanks and Hall-Mills examine the relationship between school factors and speech-language therapy enrollment in public schools. They determined that certain factors such as socioeconomic status and English as a second or other language enrollment correlate to high caseloads. The next two articles focus on articulation intervention in special populations. Flipsen and Sacks replicate the findings of a previous study regarding the efficacy of using the SATPAC (Systematic Articulation Training Program Accessing Computers) approach with children receiving intervention through response to intervention. Reported findings indicate that SATPAC can be used effectively within the response to intervention process to remediate single sound errors in children. Finally, Findley and Gasparyan investigate the effectiveness of biofeedback technologies as a form of intervention for speech sound production. Specifically, they explore the use of speech to text in children with articulation disorders.
Promoting Mental Health for School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists & Students
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
Upon entering into a new school year, this SIG 16 Perspectives activity highlights some of the realities faced by school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and their students. Across all articles, readers will learn of the challenges that are all too often experienced by SLPs and our students, as well as recommendations for how to increase satisfaction with school-based positions, reduce burnout, and increase the mental health, representation, and motivation of our students. In the first article, the authors (Amir, Jones, Frankel, & Fritzch) report survey results that found that although school-based SLPs are satisfied with their relationships with students, they continue to experience challenges, especially related to caseload/workload and others’ misunderstanding of the roles and responsibilities of the SLP. This article is followed by a tutorial from Marante and Farquharson, in which they provide tips to address some of these challenges and reduce feelings of burnout and overwhelm, providing helpful checklists in the appendices. In the remaining three articles, authors outline ways for school-based SLPs to further support our students. The first of these articles, by Hoff and Unger, describes how to collaborate with mental health providers to address some of the unique social-emotional needs of students who stutter. Harris and Owen Van Horne, in the subsequent article, address how to include more diverse materials within therapy sessions so that the lived experiences of all students are more accurately portrayed and represented. Lastly, Abendroth and Whited discuss ways to support older students who are transitioning into adulthood, giving readers several ideas for how to increase students’ motivation, further develop rapport, and provide models of problem solving and resiliency.
Novelty in School-Based Evaluation, Treatment, and Roles
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
This SIG 16 Perspectives activity highlights novel approaches to eligibility decision-making, intervention, and the roles and responsibilities of school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs). In the first article, the authors present a novel approach to evaluation and eligibility. Farquharson, Coleman, Moore, and Montgomery showcase how SLPs can utilize and apply a design thinking framework when making eligibility recommendations for children with oral and written language disorders. The authors give two sample eligibility predicaments and give examples of five design thinking questions (discovery, interpretation, ideation, experimentation, evolution) for each scenario. In the second article, we learn about a novel approach to intervention. Here, Page and Johnson provide a summary of electropalatographic therapy for the remediation of speech sound disorders. They also systematically reviewed the literature to summarize the extent to which this intervention technique is supported for use with children with Down syndrome. Lastly, the last group of authors discuss novel roles and responsibilities that school-based SLPs may assume. In this article, Seal and Power-deFur discuss the similarities and differences between a fact witness and an expert witness, while also providing school-based professionals with ideas of how to prepare for these roles if called to testify in a special education dispute or civil litigation case.
Graduate Education and Ethics in School-Based Practice
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 16) articles focus on ethical issues and describe considerations for the development of clinical skills in school-based settings. Readers will reflect upon and learn to resolve common ethical dilemmas, review a model of graduate mentoring from the lens of implementation science, and learn about commonly reported factors that both supervisors and graduate students believe critical within successful school-based internship experiences.
Collaboration in Language, Literacy, and Dysphagia
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 16) articles address strategies for working alongside, as well as teaching others, to improve preschool to middle school students’ performance in language, literacy, social skills, and feeding/swallowing abilities, as well as learn how others perceive speech-language pathologists’ efforts in some of these areas.
Issues in the School Setting
Format(s): SIG Perspectives
These Perspectives (SIG 16) addresses important issues for the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in working in the school setting, including assessing bilingual students, grammar interventions for school-aged students, the comfort level of SLPs when working with students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and the impact of professional development on literacy knowledge and practice.

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